Baizuo

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Baizuo (Chinese: 白左; pinyin: báizuǒ, Mandarin pronunciation: [pǎɪ.tswò]; literally "white left")[1][2] is a Chinese neologism used to refer to Western leftist ideologies primarily espoused by white people.[3] The term baizuo is related to the term shèngmǔ (simplified Chinese: 圣母; traditional Chinese: 聖母; pinyin: shèngmǔ; literally "Holy Mother") or shèngmǔbiǎo (simplified Chinese: 圣母婊; traditional Chinese: 聖母婊; pinyin: shèngmǔbiǎo; literally "Holy Mother"), a reference to those whose political opinions are perceived as being overly driven by emotion.[4]

Definition[edit]

"Baizuo" is a popular political epithet commonly used on the Chinese Internet. The literal translation is "white left" which refers to western white liberal leftists.[5] According to Chinese political scientist Chenchen Zhang, the word "Baizuo" refers to those who "only care about topics such as immigration, minorities, LGBT rights and the environment", but lack a concept of "real problems in the real world". It is also used to describe those "hypocritical humanitarians who advocate political correctness just to satisfy their own sense of moral superiority".[6][7] Some used this word to indicate those "ignorant and arrogant westerners" who "pity the rest of the world and think they are saviours".[8]

History[edit]

The term baizuo was apparently coined in a 2010 article published on Renren Network by user Li Shuo, entitled The Fake Morality of the Western White Left and the Chinese Patriotic Scientists (simplified Chinese: 西方白左和中国爱国科学家的伪道德; traditional Chinese: 西方白左和中國愛國科學家的偽道德; pinyin: Xīfāng báizuǒ hé zhōngguó àiguó kēxuéjiā de wěidàodé), initially used as a general critique of certain socialist values in the American left.[3] No further use of the term is known until 2013, where it enjoyed prominence in the Chinese forum Zhihu through 2013–2015.[citation needed]

Substantial use in Chinese Internet culture began in early 2016, at first at MIT BBS, a bulletin board system used by many Chinese Americans, during the 2016 United States presidential election. Baizuo was used there to criticize the Democratic Party's emphasis on the affirmative action policies perceived as discriminating against Asians.[9]

This term also gained some attentions in Germany and is used to criticize Angela Merkel's immigration policies.[10][11]

The term has been referenced approvingly by American conservatives, including Tucker Carlson and Rod Dreher.[12]

Similar terms in Hong Kong[edit]

A different term was widely used for similar effect in Hong Kong, called zo gaau (Chinese: 左膠; Jyutping: zo2 gaau1; literally "left dumbass" or "leftard"). The term gain popularity in HK in the 2010s, and became widespread after the 2014 Hong Kong protests.[13][14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mair, Victor (17 May 2017). ""White left" — a Chinese calque in English". Language Log. University of Pennsylvania. Archived from the original on 21 May 2017. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  2. ^ "福克斯台给美国大众普及:中国人说的"白左"是什么意思…". Sina Video (in Simplified Chinese). 21 May 2017. Archived from the original on 10 December 2017.
  3. ^ a b "这个词,让中国向西方逆向输出了一次价值观(组". iAsk.ca (in Simplified Chinese). 20 May 2017. Archived from the original on 25 June 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  4. ^ Zhang, Chenchen (11 May 2017). "The curious rise of the 'white left' as a Chinese internet insult". openDemocracy. Archived from the original on 10 June 2017.
  5. ^ 网易 (13 April 2021). "美国"白左"是如何发家的?". www.163.com. Archived from the original on 14 January 2022. Retrieved 14 January 2022. "Baizuo" is a common political epithet used in Chinese speaking media. It refers to those white liberal leftists. This word is used to satirize political correctness and reverse discrimination in Europe and the United States.
  6. ^ 多维新闻 (22 March 2021). "福克斯名嘴卡尔森借用中国热词"白左"批判美国高层|多维新闻|中国". 多维新闻 (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 14 January 2022. Retrieved 14 January 2022. Zhang Chenchen, a political scientist in mainland China, summed up the definition of "Baizuo" on the Chinese Internet. He believe "Baizuo" refers to those care so much about issues like immigration, ethnic minorities, LGBT, environmental protection, animal protection, etc., but have no concept of the real problems in real real. Those people are hypocritical humanitarians who advocate who advocate political correctness just to satisfy their own sense of moral superiority.
  7. ^ 环球时报 (21 March 2021). "终于,美国人又想起这个中文词了". news.sina.com.cn. Retrieved 14 January 2022.
  8. ^ Democracy, Open (20 May 2017). "The curious rise of the 'white left' as a Chinese internet insult". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. Retrieved 14 January 2022. Although the emphasis varies, baizuo is used generally to describe those who "only care about topics such as immigration, minorities, LGBT and the environment" and "have no sense of real problems in the real world"; they are hypocritical humanitarians who advocate for peace and equality only to "satisfy their own feeling of moral superiority"; they are "obsessed with political correctness" to the extent that they "tolerate backwards Islamic values for the sake of multiculturalism"; they believe in the welfare state that "benefits only the idle and the free riders"; they are the "ignorant and arrogant westerners" who "pity the rest of the world and think they are saviours".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Fang, Kecheng (10 December 2017). "方可成:"白左"污名化与社会达尔文主义". Red Song Society (in Simplified Chinese). Archived from the original on 6 June 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  10. ^ Graw, Ansgar (23 November 2017). "Baizuo": Chinesen verspotten Merkel als naiven weißen Gutmenschen". WELT (in German). Archived from the original on 28 November 2017. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  11. ^ "Nach dem Jamaika-Aus wird Merkel in China als "naive, weiße Westlerin" verspottet". FOCUS Online (in German). Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  12. ^ Weigel, David (2 December 2021). "Analysis | The Trailer: In three swing states, abortion bans could be on the midterm ballot". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  13. ^ 香港01記者 (6 September 2016). "BBC教你「港豬」、「熱狗」、「左膠」英文點講". 香港01 (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Retrieved 28 November 2021.
  14. ^ "SUN奇古怪:Sun潮語【和理非非】". 太陽報 (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Retrieved 28 November 2021.