Bakr bin Laden

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Bakr bin Mohammed bin Awad bin Laden
Native name
بكر بن محمد بن عوض بن لادن
Born1946
CitizenshipSaudi Arabia
Known forChairman of Saudi Binladin Group
Parent(s)

Bakr bin Laden (born in 1946 in Mecca, Saudi Arabia) (Arabic:بكر بن محمد بن عوض بن لادن) is the chairman of the Jeddah-based Saudi Binladin Group and the largest shareholder in the Group, with a 23.58% holding,[1] and, according to some, was the "true ruler of Jeddah"[2] He is the son of the family's patriarch − Mohammed bin Awad bin Laden − and a half-brother of Osama bin Laden.

Career[edit]

Despite the region’s small construction sector, he has managed to expand the business. In March,[year needed] the firm joined together with Qatari Diar to launch a joint venture holding company, which is expected to have a massive capital base. The new venture will have two umbrella firms, one of which will carry out mega contracting and construction works in Qatar and the rest of the world. It is also currently working on a $994.6m contract to design and build 30 parcels in King Abdullah Financial District, Saudi Arabia.[3]

In April 2018, Bakr transferred his stake in the Saudi Binladin Group to the government of Saudi Arabia.[4]

Arrest[edit]

On 4 November 2017, Bakr bin Laden was arrested in Saudi Arabia in a "corruption crackdown" conducted by a new royal anti-corruption committee and detained without trial.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12] This was done on authority of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman. Bakr was initially detained at The Ritz-Carlton, Riyadh[4] and later hold in a publicly-unknown location.[4] The Saudi government also seized the deed to a villa owned by Bakr overlooking the Red Sea.[4]

In January 2019 the kingdom quietly released Bakr Bin Laden together with several other prominent detainees. Among those reportedly released were Mohammed al-Amoudi, a businessman who owns much of Ethiopia and Amr Dabbagh, a former government minister who once led the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority, which aims to attract foreign investment. The move came amid unprecedented global pressure of the kingdom and Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman after the assassination of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi by Saudi agents at the country’s consulate in Istanbul.[13][14]

Education[edit]

Bakr bin Laden attended college at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, United States in 1979.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Saudi Binladin Group". Zawya.
  2. ^ Georg Mascolo and Erich Follath (6 June 2005). "Meet The Bin Ladens Osama's Road to Riches and Terror". Der Spiegel.
  3. ^ "Arabian Business".
  4. ^ a b c d Paul, Katie; Arnold, Tom; Ashad, Marwa; Kalin, Stephen (September 27, 2018). McBride, Janet; Woods, Richard (eds.). "Special Report: As a Saudi prince rose, the Bin Laden business empire crumbled". Reuters.
  5. ^ "KO SU BOGATI SAUDIJCI UHAPŠENI ZBOG KORUPCIJE? Teški su na desetine milijardi dolara, a među njima je i BRAT OSAME BIN LADENA". Blic. blic.rs. 5 November 2017. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  6. ^ Melloy, John (6 November 2017). "There may be a 'Game of Thrones' in Saudi Arabia now and that has big implications for oil". CNBC. cnbc.com. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  7. ^ "Saudi Arabia princes detained, ministers dismissed". www.aljazeera.com.
  8. ^ Kalin, Stephen; Paul, Katie (2017-11-05). "Future Saudi king tightens grip on power with arrests including Prince Alwaleed". Reuters. Retrieved 2017-11-07.
  9. ^ "Corruption crackdown in Saudi Arabia". Fox Business. 2017-11-06. Retrieved 2017-11-08.
  10. ^ David, Javier E. (5 November 2017). "Billionaire Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal arrested in corruption crackdown". cnbc.
  11. ^ Stancati, Margherita; Said, Summer; Farrell, Maureen (2017-11-05). "Saudi Princes, Former Ministers Arrested in Apparent Power Consolidation". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2017-11-08.
  12. ^ Kirkpatrick, David D. (2017-11-04). "Saudi Arabia Arrests 11 Princes, Including Billionaire Alwaleed bin Talal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-11-08.
  13. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/31/world/middleeast/saudi-arabia-corruption-purge.html
  14. ^ https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-01-27/saudi-ethiopian-billionaire-al-amoudi-released-in-saudi-arabia

External links[edit]