Balkan Athletics Indoor Championships

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Balkan Athletics Indoor Championships
Βαλκανικοί Αγώνες Κλειστού Στίβου
First event1994
Occur everyYear
PurposeIndoor track and field event between Balkan nations
OrganiserAssociation of the Balkan Athletics Federations

The Balkan Athletics Indoor Championships, also known as the Balkan Indoor Games (Greek: Βαλκανικοί Αγώνες Κλειστού Στίβου), is an annual international indoor track and field competition between athletes from the Balkan Peninsula. Following a test event in 1991,[1] it was officially launched in 1994.[2] Organised by the Association of the Balkan Athletics Federations (ABAF), it is typically held in February.[3][4][5] The competition complemented the long-running annual outdoor track and field tournament: the Balkan Games.[6]

It received strong support from the Hellenic Amateur Athletic Association – until 2002, the Peace and Friendship Stadium in Piraeus, Greece was the permanent host, as this was the only international standard indoor track and field arena in the region at that point. The Peania Indoors Arena, also near the Greek capital, took on hosting duties from 2003 to 2006, then began alternating with the Piraeus stadium.[2] The event was cancelled in both 2010 and 2011 due to the insolvency of the Greek athletics body, linked to the Greek government-debt crisis.[7] The event was continued in 2012 with Turkey as the new host nation, which had built the Ataköy Athletics Arena for the 2012 IAAF World Indoor Championships. The Balkan competition served as a major test event for the global championships.[8][9]

The programme of events has been similar to that of the IAAF World Indoor Championships, except for the omission of the combined track and field events and (usually) the 4 × 400 metres relay. Women's pole vault was introduced in 1998, giving the sexes event parity, and the 200 metres for both sexes was dropped after 2005 in line with international standards. The 1994 championships featured racewalking competitions, but these were dropped for subsequent editions.[2] In addition to individual titles, a men's and a women's team title is awarded to the best performing nation in each section. Both medal tables and points tables are collated, with the points score contributing to the team title.[10][11] The points table was introduced in 2002.

A total of seventeen nations have entered the competition during its history, with Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro being former competitors; all successor states of Yugoslavia have since competed independently, bar Kosovo.[10] The initial competition was between six nations, which expanded to nine by the end of the 1990s. The number of competing nations was further expanded between 2011 and 2014, with five more countries being admitted by the ABAF. Azerbaijan has also competed as a guest nation; its performances were discounted for medal and points-scoring purposes.[12] Romania and Greece have historically been the most successful nations at the event, although Turkey has been the most dominant since 2012.

Editions[edit]

Edition Year Stadium City Country Dates No. of
events
No. of
athletes
Men's winner[nb1] Women's winner[nb1]
1991 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece January 22  Romania  Romania
I 1994 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 20 February 25  Romania  Romania
II 1995 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 25 February 23  Greece  Romania
III 1996 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 24 February 23  Greece  Romania
IV 1997 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 22 February 23  Greece  Romania
V 1998 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 22 February 24  Romania  Romania
VI 1999 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 13 February 24  Greece  Romania
VII 2000 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 12 February 24  Bulgaria  Romania
VIII 2001 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 18 February 24  Greece  Greece
IX 2002 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 23 February 24  Greece  Greece
X 2003 Peania Indoors Arena Paiania Greece 4 March 24  Romania  Greece
XI 2004 Peania Indoors Arena Paiania Greece 28 February 24  Romania  Romania
XII 2005 Peania Indoors Arena Paiania Greece 16 February 24  Greece  Romania
XIII 2006 Peania Indoors Arena Paiania Greece 22 February 22  Romania  Romania
XIX 2007 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 21 February 22  Romania  Romania
XV 2008 Peania Indoors Arena Paiania Greece 9 February 22  Romania  Romania
XVI 2009 Peace and Friendship Stadium Piraeus Greece 21 February 22  Romania  Romania
2010 Cancelled
2011 Cancelled
XVII 2012 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 18 February 22  Greece  Turkey
XVIII 2013 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 23 February 22  Turkey  Romania
XIX 2014 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 22 February 22  Turkey  Romania
XX 2015 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 21 February 22  Turkey  Turkey
XXI 2016 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 27 February 22  Romania  Romania
XXII 2017 Kombank Arena Belgrade Serbia 25 February 22
XXIII 2018 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 17 February 24  Romania  Romania
XXIV 2019 Ataköy Athletics Arena Istanbul Turkey 16 February 24  Turkey  Ukraine
  • nb1 Team winners decided by medals up to 2001, with the points scoring format introduced in 2002.

Participation[edit]

Nation First appearance
 Greece 1991
 Albania 1991
 Bulgaria 1991
 Romania 1991
 Turkey 1991
 North Macedonia 1996
 Moldova 1996
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1998
 Serbia 2007
 Montenegro 2007
 Croatia 2011
 Armenia 2013
 Cyprus 2014
 Slovenia 2014
 Georgia 2014
 Yugoslavia 1991
 Serbia and Montenegro 1994–2002[nb2]
2003–2006

Championships records[edit]

Key:   Defunct event

Men[edit]

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Place Ref
60 m 6.58 Georgios Theodoridis  Greece 13 February 1999 Greece Piraeus, Greece
200 m 21.25 Ioan Vieru  Romania 28 February 2004 Greece Paiania, Greece [13]
400 m 46.35 Iliya Dzhivondov  Bulgaria 12 February 2000 Greece Piraeus, Greece
800 m 1:48.52 Yevhen Hutsol  Ukraine 16 February 2019 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey [14]
1500 m 3:37.49 İlham Tanui Özbilen  Turkey 23 February 2013 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
3000 m 7:42.49 Polat Kemboi Arıkan  Turkey 18 February 2012 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
60 m hurdles 7.57 Gheorghe Boroi  Romania 20 February 1994 Greece Piraeus, Greece
High jump 2.32 m Cristian Popescu  Romania 20 February 1994 Greece Piraeus, Greece
Pole vault 5.76 m Ivan Horvat  Croatia 25 February 2017 Serbia Belgrade, Serbia [15]
Long jump 8.10 m Bogdan Tudor  Romania 25 February 1995 Greece Piraeus, Greece
Triple jump 17.51 m Marian Oprea  Romania 22 February 2006 Greece Paiania, Greece
Shot put 20.77 m Stipe Žunić  Croatia 25 February 2017 Serbia Belgrade, Serbia [16]
Mesud Pezer  Bosnia and Herzegovina 17 February 2018 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey [17]
4 × 400 m relay 3:12.46 Cristian Radu
Alexandru Branzea
Zeno Moraru
Robert Parge
 Romania 17 February 2018 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey [18]

Women[edit]

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Place Ref
60 m 7.13 Tezdzhan Naimova  Bulgaria 21 February 2007 Greece Piraeus, Greece
200 m 23.70 Angela Morosanu  Romania 16 February 2005 Greece Paiania, Greece [19]
400 m 51.06 Vania Stambolova  Bulgaria 22 February 2006 Greece Paiania, Greece
800 m 1:59.82 Mihaela Neacșu  Romania 21 February 2007 Greece Piraeus, Greece
1500 m 4:06.89 Luiza Gega  Albania 27 February 2016 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
3000 m 8:55.22 Cristina Grosu  Romania 23 February 2002 Greece Piraeus, Greece
60 m hurdles 8.02 Andrea Ivančević  Croatia 27 February 2016 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
High jump 1.97 m Stefka Kostadinova  Bulgaria 20 February 1994 Greece Piraeus, Greece
Pole vault 4.50 m Tanya Stefanova  Bulgaria 16 February 2005 Greece Paiania, Greece
Nikoleta Kyriakopoulou  Greece 17 February 2018 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey [20]
Long jump 6.96 m Ivana Španović  Serbia 25 February 2017 Serbia Belgrade, Serbia [21]
Triple jump 14.84 m Hrysopiyi Devetzi  Greece 4 March 2003 Greece Paiania, Greece
Shot put 19.30 m Anca Heltne  Romania 21 February 2009 Greece Piraeus, Greece
4 × 400 m relay 3:33.76 Kateryna Klymiuk
Tetiana Melnyk
Anastasiia Bryzgina
Anna Ryzhykova
 Ukraine 16 February 2019 Turkey Istanbul, Turkey [22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ματιές στα Σπορ (Survey of Sports), vol. 29 (January 1992), p. 43.
  2. ^ a b c Balkan Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  3. ^ Mulkeen, Jon (2013-02-24). World leads by Lavillenie in Metz and Lendore, Duncan and Dendy in Fayetteville. IAAF. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  4. ^ Oprea eager for Moscow gold and World record - Balkan Indoor Champs report. IAAF (2006-02-23). Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  5. ^ Mulkeen, Jon (2014-02-22). Beitia clears two metres, Fassinotti sets Italian record – indoor champs round-up. IAAF. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  6. ^ The Balkan Games in transition. IAAF (2001-02-19). Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  7. ^ No Athens Indoor meeting this year or Balkan Indoor Games. Track and Field News. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  8. ^ Turkish medal hopes and venue tested - Istanbul 2012 . IAAF (2012-02-20). Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  9. ^ Results. Association of Balkan Athletic Federations. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  10. ^ a b Balkan Indoor Championships 2015 TEAM POINTS - MEN. Association of Balkan Athletic Federations. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  11. ^ Balkan Indoor Championships 2015 TEAM POINTS - WOMEN. Association of Balkan Athletic Federations. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  12. ^ 20th Balkan Indoor Championships 2015 Istanbul, TUR/Men/Full Results Men.pdf. ABAF. Retrieved on 2015-03-04.
  13. ^ "200m Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 28 February 2004. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  14. ^ "Balkan Indoor Championships 2019 Men's Results" (PDF). ABAF. 16 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Pole Vault Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 25 February 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  16. ^ "Shot Put Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 25 February 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  17. ^ "Balkan Indoor Championships 2018 Results" (PDF). TAF. 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  18. ^ "Balkan Indoor Championships 2018 Results" (PDF). TAF. 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  19. ^ "200m Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 16 February 2005. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  20. ^ "Balkan Indoor Championships 2018 Results" (PDF). TAF. 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  21. ^ "Long Jump Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 25 February 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  22. ^ "Balkan Indoor Championships 2019 Men's Results" (PDF). ABAF. 16 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2019.

External links[edit]