Balla Baby

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"Balla Baby"
Chingy - Balla Baby (CD 2).jpg
Single by Chingy
from the album Powerballin'
B-side "Fall-N"
Released November 1, 2004 (2004-11-01)
Format
Recorded 2004
Genre Hip hop
Length 3:33
Label
Songwriter(s) Chingy, Keith McMasters
Producer(s) Keith McMasters
Chingy singles chronology
"I Like That"
(2004)
"Balla Baby"
(2004)
"Don't Worry"
(2005)
"I Like That"
(2004)
"Balla Baby"
(2004)
"Don't Worry"
(2005)
Music video
"Balla Baby" on YouTube

"Balla Baby" is a song by American rapper Chingy. It was released as the lead single from his second album Powerballin' (2004). It garnered a mixed reception from critics, was the only single from the album to be released worldwide, and reached number 20 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 34 on the UK Singles Chart. A music video by Jeremy Rall was made to promote the single that features Chingy inside a pinball machine that's named after the album's title. The remix features Lil Flip & Boozie of G.I.B. and a music video was made for the remix.

Critical reception[edit]

The song received mixed reviews from music critics. Soren Baker of the Los Angeles Times called it a "solid braggadocio single."[1] Billboard writer Rashaun Hall described the song's catchy hook delivered in Chingy's technical flow as an "affable attempt" made to bring attention to his sophomore effort.[2] Paul Cantor of RapReviews commended the track's production but said that, "It's the borderline generic nature in which this whole record comes across that makes it less likely to pick up in the way the techno-inspired "Right Thurr" did."[3] Reviewing the album for Rolling Stone, Jon Caramanica put it alongside "We Clubbin'" as examples that showcase Chingy's charm and unique delivery, but found them "amiable, but aimless."[4]

Commercial performance[edit]

"Balla Baby" debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 the week of October 9, 2004 at number 67.[5] It moved eleven spots to number 56 the week of October 16, 2004.[6] It then moved fifteen spots to number 41 the week of October 23, 2004.[7] It reached the top 40 the week of October 30, 2004 by moving sixteen spots to number 25.[8] It peaked at number 20 the week of November 13, 2004 and held that position for two weeks, remaining on the chart for eighteen weeks.[9] It was the first single released by Chingy to not reach the top 5 in that chart after three consecutive hits off his Jackpot album.

Music video[edit]

Directed by Jeremy Rall,[10] the video features Chingy and scantily-clad women inside a pinball machine called "Powerballin'" (the album's title). Inside the machine, Chingy is going to a meeting with a record executive, stunting next to various luxury cars and women, inside a bank vault filled with money and playing at a casino with various people around him. A barn owl is occasionally featured during the video. The video ends with Chingy playing the machine while two women watch. The explicit remix version of the video was released afterwards.

Formats and track listing[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (2004–05) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[15] 19
Canadian Singles Chart 6
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[16] 7
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[17] 34
US Billboard Hot 100[18] 20
US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs (Billboard)[19] 17
US Hot Rap Songs (Billboard)[20] 7
US Mainstream Top 40 (Billboard)[21] 23

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
United States (RIAA)[22] Gold 500,000^

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baker, Soren (November 14, 2004). "Destiny's glass only half full". Los Angeles Times. Tronc, Inc. Retrieved January 3, 2017. 
  2. ^ Hall, Rashaun. "Powerballin'". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on November 25, 2004. Retrieved January 3, 2017. 
  3. ^ Cantor, Paul (November 16, 2004). "Chingy :: Powerballin' :: Capitol/EMI". RapReviews. Retrieved January 3, 2017. 
  4. ^ Caramanica, Jon (November 16, 2004). "Chingy: Powerballin'". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Archived from the original on October 13, 2007. Retrieved January 3, 2017. 
  5. ^ Whitmire, Margo (September 30, 2004). "Ciara's 'Goodies' Won't Budge From No. 1". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  6. ^ Whitmire, Margo (October 7, 2004). "Ciara Still No. 1, Eminem Moves Top 10". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  7. ^ Whitmire, Margo (October 14, 2004). "'Goodies' Still Good Enough For No. 1". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  8. ^ Whitmire, Margo (October 21, 2004). "'Boo!': Usher, Keys Scare Up No. 1 Single". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Chingy - Balla Baby". aCharts.us. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Jeremy Rall". mvdbase.com. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Chingy - Balla Baby (CD)". Discogs. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Chingy - Balla Baby (CD)". Discogs. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Chingy - Balla Baby / Fall-N (Vinyl)". Discogs. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Chingy - Balla Baby (CD)". Discogs. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Australian-charts.com – Chingy – Balla Baby". ARIA Top 50 Singles.
  16. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Chingy – Balla Baby". Top 40 Singles.
  17. ^ "Archive Chart: 2004-11-13" UK Singles Chart.
  18. ^ "Chingy – Chart history" Billboard Hot 100 for Chingy. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  19. ^ "Chingy – Chart history" Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs for Chingy. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  20. ^ "Chingy – Chart history" Billboard Hot Rap Songs for Chingy. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  21. ^ "Chingy – Chart history" Billboard Pop Songs for Chingy. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  22. ^ "American single certifications – Chingy – Balla Baby". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved September 15, 2014.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]