Baluchistan States Union

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This article is about the former Baluchistan States Union. For other uses, see Balochistan.
Baluchistan States Union
Subdivision of Pakistan
3 October 1952–14 October 1955

Flag of Baluchistan States Union

Flag

Capital Kalat
History
 •  Established 3 October 1952
 •  Disestablished 14 October 1955
Area 206,382 km2 (79,685 sq mi)
Government of Balochistan
Coat of arms of Pakistan
This article is part of the series
Former administrative units of Pakistan

The Baluchistan States Union (Urdu: بلوچستان ریاستی اتحاد) was an administrative division of Pakistan that existed between 3 October 1952 and 14 October 1955 in southwest Pakistan. It was formed by the four princely states of Kalat, Kharan, Las Bela and Makran with the capital at the town of Kalat.[1] The area of the Union was roughly the western half of the modern province of Balochistan. The Union was separate from the Chief Commissioners Province of Baluchistan which comprised areas to the northeast of the Union. The Union did not include the enclave of Gwadar which was part of the Sultanate of Oman. The four state rulers continued in office and retained autonomy.[2]

Pakistan with the BSU highlighted in red

The BSU was formed after the accession of four individual princely states to the new Dominion of Pakistan in 1948. The area became the Kalat Division when the Union was dissolved. The first head of the Union was the Khan of Kalat, Ahmad of Kalat. The main governing body was the Council of Rulers which comprised the Khan-e-Azam, the Jam of Las Bela and the Nawabs of Kharan and Makran. Decisions on major issues could be taken by a jirga or council of all the nobles or sardars of the Union.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gwillim Law (1999). Administrative Subdivisions of Countries: A Comprehensive World Reference, 1900 through 1998. McFarland. p. 276. 
  2. ^ William Ascher and Natalia Mirovitskaya (2013). Development Strategies, Identities, and Conflict in Asia. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 134. 

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