Bamboo Union

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The United Bamboo Gang (Chinese: 竹聯幫; pinyin: Zhūliánbāng) is the largest of Taiwan's three main Triads.[1][2][3] They are reported to have roughly 100,000 members.[1][3][4] The membership consists largely of waishengren (Mainland Chinese) and has had historic ties to the Kuomintang; they are said to be motivated as much by political ideology as by profit.[5] The gang gained global notoriety when it became directly involved in politics in the early 1980s; alleged mob boss and his accomplices Tung Kuei-sen and Wu Tun murdered writer Henry Liu in California in 1984. Chen Chi-li was arrested in Taiwan, tried, and convicted; however, his life sentence was commuted after seven years, at which point he fled to Cambodia, where he lived until his death.[6] The incident was later portrayed in the 2009 American political thriller film Formosa Betrayed,[7] produced by Will Tiao.[8]

Bamboo Union and Four Seas Gang and Heaven Way Alliance, saying "Taiwan's three main criminal organisations"

Historical leadership[edit]

Boss (official and acting)[edit]

Rulers (unofficial)[edit]

Notable cases[edit]

In July 2009, Chinese Bamboo Union hitman Bai Xiao Ye stabbed and slashed a man to death in a Las Vegas, Nevada karaoke bar and wounded two others. In 2013, Bai was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. Bai had also been charged with fatally shooting a man and wounding another at a Los Angeles karaoke bar.[9]

Organization[edit]

Since the 1950s development, Bamboo Union organization has 80 branches, members and partner relations up to 100,000 people.

忠堂、孝堂、仁堂、愛堂、信堂、義堂、和堂、平堂、天堂、地堂、至堂、尊堂、萬堂、古堂、長堂、青堂、東堂、南堂、西堂、北堂、風堂、火堂、雷堂、電堂、五行堂、戰堂、捍衛隊、梅堂、蘭堂、竹堂、菊堂、僑堂、龍堂、鳳堂、虎堂、獅堂、鶴堂、狗堂、豹堂、熊堂、天龍堂、天蠍堂、天鷹堂、地海堂、地虎堂、乾坤堂、太極堂、玄武堂、文武堂、光武堂、震武堂、威武堂、忠義堂、軍堂、將堂、豪堂、華堂、海堂、刀堂、萬華堂、金堂、銀堂、銅堂、鐵堂、貔貅堂、麒麟堂、精武堂、精誠堂、精正堂、精忠堂、猛堂、聖堂、正堂、日堂、月堂、彪堂、中山堂、濤堂、大勇堂、明堂、斗六堂、慶雲堂、鷹虎堂、雪山堂、同心堂、驫堂、漢堂、蒙堂、苗堂、藏堂...etc.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bishop, Mac William (June 4, 2005). "Taiwan's gangs go global". Asia Times. Retrieved April 5, 2014. 
  2. ^ Simon, Sheldon W. (August 21, 2001). The Many Faces of Asian Security. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 204. ISBN 9781461608387. 
  3. ^ a b Kaplan, David E.; Dubro, Alec (May 20, 2012). Yakuza. University of California Press. pp. 260–261. ISBN 9780520953819. 
  4. ^ "The List: The World's Most Dangerous Gangs", Foreign Policy, 2008-05-08, retrieved 2010-04-21 
  5. ^ Chang, Rich (2005-05-08), "Police begin probe into Bamboo Union after airport clash", Taipei Times, retrieved 2010-04-21 
  6. ^ O'Neill, Mark (2007-10-24). "King Duck Goes to His Taiwanese Reward". Asia Sentinel. Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  7. ^ Zhao, Xiaojian; Park, Edward J.W. (November 30, 2013). Asian Americans: An Encyclopedia of Social, Cultural, Economic, and Political History. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 9781598842401. 
  8. ^ Adams, Jonathan (February 28, 2010). "Hollywood highlights Taiwan's "White Terror"". Global Post. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. Retrieved April 5, 2014. 
  9. ^ Lowther, William (March 7, 2013). "US court sentences Bamboo Union gang hitman to life in jail". Taipei Times. 

External links[edit]