Bambuterol

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Bambuterol
Bambuterol.svg
Bambuterol ball-and-stick model.png
Bambuterol (top),
and (R)-bambuterol (bottom)
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Pregnancy
category
  • Unknown
Routes of
administration
Oral (tablets)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 20%
Metabolism Extensive hepatic.
Further metabolized to terbutaline by plasma cholinesterase
Biological half-life 13 hours (bambuterol)
21 hours (terbutaline)
Excretion Renal
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.171.084
Chemical and physical data
Formula C18H29N3O5
Molar mass 367.44 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
Chirality Racemic mixture
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Bambuterol (INN) is a long-acting β adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) used in the treatment of asthma; it also is a prodrug of terbutaline. Commercially, the AstraZeneca pharmaceutical company produces and markets bambuterol as Bambec and Oxeol.[1]

It is not available in the U.S.

Indications[edit]

As other LABAs, bambuterol is used in the long-term management of persistent asthma.[1] It should not be used as a rescue medication for short-term relief of asthma symptoms.

Contraindications[edit]

Bambuterol is contraindicated in pregnancy and in people with seriously impaired liver function. It can be used by people with renal impairment, but dose adjustments are necessary.[1]

Adverse effects[edit]

The adverse effect profile of bambuterol is similar to that of salbutamol, and may include fatigue, nausea, palpitations, headache, dizziness and tremor.[1]

Interactions[edit]

Concomitant administration of bambuterol with corticosteroids, diuretics, and xanthine derivatives (such as theophylline) increases the risk of hypokalemia (decreased levels of potassium in the blood).[2]

Bambuterol acts as a cholinesterase inhibitor, and can prolong the duration of action of suxamethonium (succinylcholine) and other drugs whose breakdown in the body depends on cholinesterase function.[1] Butyrylcholinesterase activity returns to normal approximately two weeks after bambuterol is stopped.[3] It can also enhance the effects of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blockers, such as vecuronium bromide.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Sweetman, Sean C., ed. (2009). "Bronchodilators and Anti-asthma Drugs". Martindale: The complete drug reference (36th ed.). London: Pharmaceutical Press. pp. 1115–16. ISBN 978-0-85369-840-1. 
  2. ^ a b Sweetman (2009), pp. 1132–33.
  3. ^ Sitar DS (October 1996). "Clinical pharmacokinetics of bambuterol". Clin Pharmacokinet. 31 (4): 246–56. doi:10.2165/00003088-199631040-00002. PMID 8896942.