Banded yellow robin

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Banded yellow robin
Poecilodryas placens - The Birds of New Guinea (2).jpg
Illustration by John Gould and W. Hart
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Petroicidae
Genus: Gennaeodryas
Mathews, 1920
Species:
G. placens
Binomial name
Gennaeodryas placens
(Ramsay, E.P., 1879)
Synonyms

Poecilodryas placens

The banded yellow robin or olive-yellow robin (Gennaeodryas placens) is a species of bird in the Australasian robin family Petroicidae that is found in New Guinea. It is the only species in the genus Gennaeodryas. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. It has a high mortality rate due to its inability to traverse across a matrix.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

The banded yellow robin was described by the Australian zoologist Edward Pierson Ramsay in 1879 from a specimen collected in southeastern New Guinea. He coined the binomial name Eopsaltria placens.[3] The species was subsequently placed in the genus Poecilodryas.[4] It was moved to the resurrected genus Gennaeodryas based on the results of a molecular phylogenetic study published in 2011.[5][6] The genus Gennaeodryas had been introduced by the Australian ornithologist Gregory Mathews in 1920.[7] The genus name combines the Ancient Greek gennaios "noble" or "high-born" with dryad "tree-nymph".[8] The specific epithet placens is the Latin word for "charming" or "pleasing".[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Poecilodryas placens". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 16 July 2012.
  2. ^ "Scopus preview - Scopus - Welcome to Scopus". www.scopus.com. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  3. ^ Ramsay, E.P. (1879). "Contributions to the zoology of New Guinea. Parts I and II". Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales. 3: 241-305 [272].
  4. ^ Mayr, Ernst; Cottrell, G. William, eds. (1986). Check-list of Birds of the World. Volume 11. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Museum of Comparative Zoology. p. 576.
  5. ^ Christidis, L.; Irestedt, M.; Rowe, D.; Boles, W.E.; Norman, J.A. (2011). "Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA phylogenies reveal a complex evolutionary history in the Australasian robins (Passeriformes: Petroicidae)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 61 (3): 726–738. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2011.08.014.
  6. ^ Gill, Frank; Donsker, David, eds. (2019). "Australasian robins, rockfowl, rockjumpers, Rail-babbler". World Bird List Version 9.2. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  7. ^ Mathews, Gregory (1920). Birds of Australia. Volume 8. London: Witherby. p. 186.
  8. ^ Jobling, J.A. (2019). del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J.; Christie, D.A.; de Juana, E. (eds.). "Gennaeodryas". Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive: Key to Scientific Names in Ornithology. Lynx Edicions. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  9. ^ Jobling, J.A. (2019). del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J.; Christie, D.A.; de Juana, E. (eds.). "placens-placentis". Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive: Key to Scientific Names in Ornithology. Lynx Edicions. Retrieved 17 June 2019.