Bandera County, Texas

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Bandera County
The Bandera County Courthouse in Bandera. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 31, 1979.
The Bandera County Courthouse in Bandera. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 31, 1979.
Flag of Bandera County
Official seal of Bandera County
Map of Texas highlighting Bandera County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 29°44′N 99°14′W / 29.74°N 99.23°W / 29.74; -99.23
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1856
Named forBandera Pass
SeatBandera
Largest communityLakehills
Area
 • Total798 sq mi (2,070 km2)
 • Land791 sq mi (2,050 km2)
 • Water6.7 sq mi (17 km2)  0.8%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total20,851
 • Density26/sq mi (10/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district21st
Websitewww.banderacounty.org

Bandera County (Spanish: "flag", /bænˈdɛrə/ ban-DERR) is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. It is located in the Hill Country and its county seat is Bandera.[1]

As of the 2020 census, the population is 20,851.[2][3] Bandera County is part of the San Antonio-New Braunfels Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The county is officially recognized as the "Cowboy Capital of the World" by the Texas Legislature.[4]

History[edit]

In 1856, the Texas Legislature established Bandera County from portions of Bexar and Uvalde counties, and named the county and its seat for Bandera Pass, which uses the Spanish word for flag.

Native Americans[edit]

Although the county's earliest evidence of human habitation dates from 8000 to 4000 BC, the county's earliest known ethnology places Lipan Apache and later Comanche settlements in the area during the 17th century.[5]

19th century[edit]

In 1841, John Coffee Hays and a troop of Texas Rangers defeated a large party of Comanche warriors, thereby pacifying the region in what became known as the Battle of Bandera Pass.[6][7][8]

In 1853, John James and Charles S. DeMontel survey and plan the town of Bandera, which facilitates settlement by A. M. Milstead, Thomas Odem, P.D. Saner, and their families along the river. The families begin making cypress shingles.[9] James, Montel and Company build a horse-powered sawmill and open a store within a year.[5][10] In the wake of successive national insurrections crushed by Prussia, Austria and Russia, 16 Polish families arrive in Bandera in 1855 and begin working in James and DeMontel's sawmill. August Klappenbach opens the first store and post office. In 1856, the Texas Legislature establishes Bandera County from portions of Bexar County, and the county is formally organized.

By 1860, the population grows to 399, which included 12 slaves. By 1880, sheep and Angora goats become more profitable than farming.

20th century[edit]

In 1920, Cora and Ed Buck launch Bandera's tourist industry by taking boarders at their ranch,[11][12] and by 1933, Frontier Times Museum opens to the public.[13][14]

During the last 30 years of the 20th century, with an estimated 80% of its land dedicated to farming and ranching industries, the county government facilitates three major actions to preserve its natural heritage: the Lost Maples State Natural Area opens to the public in 1979,[15] the Hill Country State Natural Area[16] opens to the public in 1984,[17] and the Nature Conservancy purchases 1,400 acres (5.7 km2) of the Love Creek Ranch[18] from Baxter and Carol Adams to create the Love Creek Preserve in 2000.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 798 square miles (2,070 km2), of which 791 square miles (2,050 km2) is land and 6.7 square miles (17 km2) (0.8%) is water.[20] Bandara County is located on the Edwards Plateau.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860399
187064962.7%
18802,158232.5%
18903,79575.9%
19005,33240.5%
19104,921−7.7%
19204,001−18.7%
19303,784−5.4%
19404,23411.9%
19504,4104.2%
19603,892−11.7%
19704,74722.0%
19807,08449.2%
199010,56249.1%
200017,64567.1%
201020,48516.1%
202020,8511.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[21]
1850–2010[22] 2010[23] 2020[24]

2020 census[edit]

Bandera County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[23] Pop 2020[24] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 16,576 15,595 80.92% 74.79%
Black or African American alone (NH) 90 102 0.44% 0.49%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 121 101 0.59% 0.48%
Asian alone (NH) 55 95 0.27% 0.46%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 11 0.00% 0.05%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 18 71 0.09% 0.34%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 210 866 1.03% 4.15%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 3,415 4,010 16.67% 19.23%
Total 20,485 20,851 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.


2010 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 20,485 people living in the county. 92.8% were White, 0.8% Native American, 0.5% Black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 3.8% of some other race and 1.8% of two or more races. 16.7% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race). 17.6% were of German, 13.7% English, 10.2% Irish and 10.1% American ancestry.[25]

As of the census[26] of 2000, there were 17,645 people, 7,010 households, and 5,061 families living in the county. The population density was 22 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 9,503 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 94.02% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.90% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 2.55% from other races, and 1.86% from two or more races. 13.51% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,010 households, out of which 29.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.80% were married couples living together, 7.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were non-families. 23.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.70% under the age of 18, 5.80% from 18 to 24, 25.70% from 25 to 44, 27.60% from 45 to 64, and 16.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,013, and the median income for a family was $45,906. Males had a median income of $31,733 versus $24,451 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,635. About 7.70% of families and 10.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.20% of those under age 18 and 9.40% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve Bandera County:[27]

All of the county is in the service area of Alamo Community College District.[28]

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Politics[edit]

United States presidential election results for Bandera County, Texas[29]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 10,057 79.10% 2,505 19.70% 153 1.20%
2016 8,163 79.89% 1,726 16.89% 329 3.22%
2012 7,426 78.60% 1,864 19.73% 158 1.67%
2008 6,935 74.59% 2,250 24.20% 112 1.20%
2004 6,933 79.32% 1,738 19.88% 70 0.80%
2000 5,613 77.18% 1,426 19.61% 234 3.22%
1996 3,700 65.22% 1,383 24.38% 590 10.40%
1992 2,674 50.24% 1,059 19.90% 1,589 29.86%
1988 3,435 72.15% 1,251 26.28% 75 1.58%
1984 3,152 80.04% 771 19.58% 15 0.38%
1980 2,373 70.63% 894 26.61% 93 2.77%
1976 1,554 56.18% 1,183 42.77% 29 1.05%
1972 1,796 79.50% 434 19.21% 29 1.28%
1968 842 46.78% 535 29.72% 423 23.50%
1964 762 46.49% 876 53.45% 1 0.06%
1960 942 63.48% 539 36.32% 3 0.20%
1956 1,083 76.05% 336 23.60% 5 0.35%
1952 1,350 78.95% 358 20.94% 2 0.12%
1948 570 50.35% 445 39.31% 117 10.34%
1944 634 50.40% 532 42.29% 92 7.31%
1940 432 32.80% 881 66.89% 4 0.30%
1936 431 36.81% 720 61.49% 20 1.71%
1932 359 28.74% 883 70.70% 7 0.56%
1928 936 74.52% 317 25.24% 3 0.24%
1924 442 47.84% 425 46.00% 57 6.17%
1920 249 40.75% 311 50.90% 51 8.35%
1916 168 22.34% 537 71.41% 47 6.25%
1912 158 22.25% 412 58.03% 140 19.72%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Bandera County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  3. ^ "Bandera County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  4. ^ Pannebaker, Judith (July 11, 2013). "Bandera now official 'Cowboy Capital of the World'". Bandera County Courier. Archived from the original on August 11, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Long, Christopher (June 12, 2010). "Bandera County, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Archived from the original on December 21, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  6. ^ Fisher, O Clark (1966). "Battle of Bandera Pass". Great Western Indian Fights. Bison. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-8032-5186-1.
  7. ^ Tobin, Peggy (August 31, 2010). "Battle of Bandera Pass". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  8. ^ McConnell, Joseph Caroll. "Famous Battle of Bandera Pass". Fort Tours. Fort Tour Systems, Inc. Archived from the original on November 25, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  9. ^ Schumacher, Dr MJ (November 5, 2009). "Granddaughter's memories bring early history to life". Bandera County Courier.
  10. ^ Tobin, Peggy (June 12, 2010). "Bandera, Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Archived from the original on November 1, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  11. ^ Wise, Dan (July 25, 2006). "Celebrate Bandera County honors Bandera County's dude ranches". The Bandera Bulletin.
  12. ^ "Old Buck Ranch". Texas State Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Archived from the original on March 1, 2012. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  13. ^ Pohlen, Jerome (2006). "Frontier Times Museum". Oddball Texas: A Guide to Some Really Strange Places. Chicago Review Press. pp. 140–141. ISBN 978-1-55652-583-4.
  14. ^ "Frontier Times Museum". Texas State Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Archived from the original on March 14, 2012. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  15. ^ "Lost Maples State Park". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  16. ^ Coppedge, Clay. "Bandera-Hill Country State Natural Preserve". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes – Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  17. ^ "Hill Country State Natural Area". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  18. ^ Permenter, Paris; Bigley, John (2006). Day Trips from San Antonio. GPP Travel. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-7627-3868-7.
  19. ^ "Love Creek Preserve". The Nature Conservancy. Retrieved November 28, 2010.
  20. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  21. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  22. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  23. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Bandera County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  24. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Bandera County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  25. ^ ""American FactFinder"". Archived from the original on January 8, 2015. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  26. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  27. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Bandera County, TX" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2022. - Text list
  28. ^ Texas Education Code, Sec. 130.162. ALAMO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA..
  29. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 19, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 29°44′N 99°14′W / 29.74°N 99.23°W / 29.74; -99.23