Bands and musicians from Yorkshire and North East England

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The following is a list of bands and musicians from Yorkshire and the north east of England, sorted by town or city. Those to have a number one single are shown in bold.

Contents

Bands and musicians[edit]

Barnsley[edit]

Batley[edit]

Benton[edit]

Bingley[edit]

Bolton upon Dearne[edit]

Bradford[edit]

Bradford's Kimberley Walsh performs with Girls Aloud.

Bridlington[edit]

Brighouse[edit]

Consett[edit]

Darlington[edit]

Dewsbury[edit]

Doncaster[edit]

Durham[edit]

Halifax[edit]

Harrogate[edit]

Helmsley[edit]

Huddersfield[edit]

Keighley[edit]

Kingston upon Hull[edit]

Leeds[edit]

Armley band Chumbawamba playing an early gig at the University of Leeds in 1986

Middlesbrough[edit]

Newcastle[edit]

Dire Straits
Sting live in Budapest, 2000

Ossett[edit]

Ovingham[edit]

Rotherham[edit]

Rothwell[edit]

Ryton[edit]

Scarborough[edit]

Settle[edit]

Sheffield[edit]

The Human League, July 2007: from left, Philip Oakey, Joanne Catherall, Susan Ann Sulley

Stakeford[edit]

Sunderland[edit]

Todmorden[edit]

Tynemouth[edit]

Wakefield[edit]

Washington[edit]

Whitby[edit]

Whitley Bay[edit]

York[edit]

Notable albums[edit]

Live at Leeds[edit]

Released in 1970, Live at Leeds is the most famous live album performed by The Who. The album was recorded from a concert held at the University of Leeds as part of a two leg gig. The preferred recording was from the second night at Hull, however the bass line failed to record so the Leeds recording was used instead. It is thought by many to be the best live rock album of all time[54] and is included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[55] The album made it to No. 3 in the UK charts and No. 4 in the US charts.

Live at Leeds[edit]

Live at Leeds is a John Martyn album. He independently released this album himself in an initial run of 10,000. Recorded 13 February 1975 (the sleeve incorrectly states October), at Leeds University, this is an essential snapshot of Martyn at what is possibly his peak.

London 0, Hull 4[edit]

The Housemartins' debut album, London 0 Hull 4, released in 1986, refers to the band's home town in the form of a sports result. The title may have been a jibe at London centrism, and Whitehall itself; given that the band were known Marxists, this wouldn't have been out of context. The album made it to No. 3 in the UK charts.

Fog on the Tyne[edit]

Lindisfarne's 1971 album Fog on the Tyne was named after Newcastle's river, the Tyne and the morning fog cover which it is widely associated. The highly acclaimed album made No. 1 in the UK album charts.

Five Bridges[edit]

The Nice's 1970 album Five Bridges was named for the classical-jazz-rock piece "The Five Bridges Suite" which occupied the first side of the LP. It was written about the UK city of Newcastle and its then five bridges on the River Tyne.

Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not[edit]

Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not is the debut studio album by Arctic Monkeys, released on 23 January 2006 by Domino. The album surpassed Elastica's self-titled album to become the fastest selling debut album in British music history, shifting over 360,000 copies in its first week, and remains the fastest selling debut album by a band. It has since gone quintuple platinum in the UK.

Festivals[edit]

Alnwick[edit]

  • Alnwick International Music Festival, Alnwick

Beverley[edit]

Billingham[edit]

Bradford[edit]

Bridlington[edit]

Corbridge[edit]

Dalby, North Yorkshire (near Scarborough)[edit]

Kingston upon Hull[edit]

  • Hull Freedom Festival
  • Hull Jazz Festival
  • Hull Metalfest
  • Hull Sea Shanty Festival
  • Humber Street Sesh
  • Winterlude Festival

Leeds[edit]

Marsden (Huddersfield)[edit]

  • Marsden Jazz Festival

Middlesbrough[edit]

Newcastle/Gateshead[edit]

Reeth (Swaledale, North Yorkshire)[edit]

Scarborough, North Yorkshire[edit]

The Beached Festival, Scarborough 2007

Sheffield[edit]

Stockton-on-Tees[edit]

Sunderland[edit]

  • Split Festival

Wakefield[edit]

  • Reindeer Beer and Music Fest, 11, 12, 13 September, Overton

Wetherby[edit]

  • Life Goes On

Whitby[edit]

Venues[edit]

Since the completion of the Leeds Arena (capacity 13,500) in May 2013 there are now three large, purpose-built arenas in the region, the other two being Newcastle (11,000) and Sheffield (13,500). The KC Stadium in Hull is used as a concert venue having hosted REM and The Who. Elland Road in Leeds is also used as one having hosted U2, Queen, Happy Mondays and the Kaiser Chiefs.

Batley[edit]

Billingham[edit]

  • Billingham Forum, owned by Jordan Parkin

Bradford[edit]

Bridlington[edit]

Darlington[edit]

  • Darlington Arena
  • The Forum

Gateshead[edit]

The Sage Gateshead viewed from central Newcastle

Halifax[edit]

  • Victoria Hall

Harrogate[edit]

Hartlepool[edit]

  • Escobar
  • The Studio

Huddersfield[edit]

  • 1:22
  • Bates Mill Warehouse
  • The Parish
  • Zephyr

Kingston upon Hull[edit]

Leeds[edit]

University of Leeds
The Kaiser Chiefs in concert at Elland Road

Middlesbrough[edit]

Newcastle[edit]

Metro Radio Arena, Newcastle

Scarborough[edit]

Selby[edit]

  • The Riverside Live Music Venue

Sheffield[edit]

  • Corporation
  • Crucible Theatre
  • The Grapes
  • The Leadmill
  • O2 Academy Sheffield (Roxy Disco)
  • Octagon
  • The Plug
  • The Sheffield Arena
  • Sheffield City Hall

Stockton-on-Tees[edit]

Sunderland[edit]

Wakefield[edit]

  • Escobar

York[edit]

  • The Apollo Festival
  • The Barbican
  • The Basement
  • The Duchess
  • Fibbers
  • The Fulford Arms
  • The Spread Eagle
  • Yorfest 'The Yorkshire Festival'
  • York Opera House

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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