Bandy World Championship

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Bandy World Championship
Sport Bandy
Inaugural season 1957
No. of teams 16 (last tournament, 2018)
Countries Worldwide
Most recent
champion(s)
 Russia (11th title 2018)
Most titles  Soviet Union (14 titles)
Official website worldbandy.com
Current sports event 2018 Bandy World Championship
A record eighteen countries participated in the World Championships of 2016 and 2017. Blue means Division A countries, red Division B countries and green the other FIB members. Latvia, which was relegated from Division A in 2016, made a late cancellation in 2017.
The old outdoor arena in Västerås, where Finland in 2004 won the final for the so far only time
Zinkensdamms IP, venue for the final at the XXVIth championships in 2006
ABB Arena Syd of the XXIXth championships in 2009

The Bandy World Championship is a competition between bandy-playing nations' men's teams. The tournament is administrated by the Federation of International Bandy. It is distinct from the Bandy World Cup, a club competition, and from the Women's Bandy World Championship.

History[edit]

Although bandy has been played since the 19th century, the first men's world championships were only played in 1957, and the first women's ones were only in 2004. A bandy tournament was held as a demonstration sport at the 1952 Winter Olympics in Oslo, but this had no world championship status. A four nation tournament in 1954 was played in Moscow, this was the first time the Soviet Union met teams from other countries and the first time the new, jointly agreed rules were used, but this wasn't called a world championship. The international federation was founded in 1955 by the four countries which had played in Moscow.

The first ever Bandy World Championship was organised in 1957 in association with the 50th anniversary of the Ball Association of Finland, which at the time was the governing body of bandy in Finland. It was played at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium.[1]

From 1961-2003, the championships were played every two years, but has since then been played annually.

Participating nations[edit]

For a long time, only four countries competed in the world championships: the Soviet Union, Sweden, Finland and Norway, with the Soviet Union as the dominating country. Since then, more countries have joined the tournaments, starting with the United States in 1985. The interest for the sport has spread to other parts of Europe, North America and Asia, and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 also opened the way for separate national teams from the former Soviet republics. Somalia became the first team from Africa to compete, in the 2014 tournament in Irkutsk.[2] The record number of participants are 18, set in 2016 and 2017.

Denmark, Switzerland, Armenia and Poland are countries that have expressed interest in participating in future tournaments,[3] but has so far (2017) not made any appearance. Denmark and Poland have in fact exited FIB. Armenia wanted to come already to 2011,[4] but wasn't allowed to, as the tournament format at the time only allowed twelve teams and several more wanted to come. Of the countries which still haven't taken part, at least India was also denied in 2011.[5] Most probably also Lithuania.[6][7] The reason for the 2011 tournament having only eleven teams, was a late cancellation from Australia,[8] another country no longer an FIB member.

With more nations competing, Group B was created in 1991. In 2012 there was a Group C for the first time as 14 countries participated. Group C was abolished already in 2013, when instead two sub-groups of Group B were created. In 2014 there were two sub-groups also in Group A, increasing the number of teams in that division from six to eight. The number of groups is not fixed, it is changed from year to year. Japan and Kyrgyzstan made their first World Championships in 2012, Ukraine joined in 2013, Germany and Somalia made their debuts in 2014, China in 2015, and the Czech Republic in 2016. Russia, Finland, Sweden, Kazakhstan, Norway, USA and Belarus usually play in group A. Until 2011, the best team in group B used to go into a playoff match with the team which came bottom of the A-group, replacing them if they won. In 2004 the B-pool was played in a location separate from group A for the first time, at the City Park Ice Rink in Budapest. In 2013 this happened again as Vetlanda hosted the B-pool, whereas Vänersborg was the main venue of the A-pool with three matches played at other locations, Trollhättan, Gothenburg and Oslo. In 2015 and 2016 the tournament were separated in time while in the same cities. The Division B matches are shorter in time, except for the end matches.

Participation details[edit]

Team 57 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 01
 Belarus part of Soviet Union 7th
 Canada 6th 6th 7th 7th
 Finland 2nd 3rd 2nd 4th 2nd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 2nd 3rd 4th 3rd 3rd 2nd 3rd
 Hungary 8th 7th 8th 8th
 Kazakhstan part of Soviet Union 4th 4th 5th 4th
 Netherlands 7th 8th 9th
 Norway 4th 4th 2nd 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 3rd 5th 5th 4th 5th
 Russia part of Soviet Union 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st
 Soviet Union 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 1st 3rd 1st 1st defunct
 Sweden 3rd 2nd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st 2nd 1st 3rd 2nd 1st 1st 1st 3rd 2nd
 United States 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 6th 6th 6th 6th
Total teams 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 8 8 8 9 6 7
Team 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total
 Belarus 6th 7th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 7th 7th 6th 7th 6th 6th 8th 15
 Canada 9th 8th 8th 8th 8th 7th 8th 8th 8th 8th 9th 15
 China 15th 16th 17th 12th 4
 Czech Republic 15th 16th 2
 Germany 15th 12th 9th 7th 7th 5
 Estonia 8th 10th 10th 12th 12th 10th 9th 12th 11th 10th 9th DSQ 14th 11th 14
 Finland 4th 1st 4th 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 4th 4th 4th 4th 2nd 3rd 3rd 38
 Hungary 8th 11th 9th 10th 13th 13th 10th 10th 9th 10th 11th 10th 10th 10th 8th 19
 Japan 13th 13th 12th 13th 13th 12th 10th 7
 Kazakhstan 3rd 4th 3rd 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 4th 5th 4th 20
 Kyrgyzstan 14th 1
 Latvia 8th 9th 10th 8th 9th 10th 9th 9th 7th 8th 10
 Mongolia 11th 11th 12th 12th 11th 14th 14th 12th 11th 13th 10
 Netherlands 9th 11th 9th 10th 9th 11th 11th 9th 11th 11th 12th 13th 11th 14th 15th 9th 19
 Norway 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 4th 6th 36
 Russia 2nd 3rd 2nd 1st 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 1st 21
 Slovakia 15th 1
 Somalia 17th 16th 17th 18th 16th 5
 Sweden 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd 38
 Ukraine 14th 16th 11th 13th 14th 5
 United States 7th 6th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 6th 6th 6th 7th 6th 8th 7th 6th 5th 25
Total teams 9 11 11 12 12 13 13 11 11 14 14 17 16 18 18 16

Competition format[edit]

Originally, the competition was played as an all-meet-all round-robin tournament. Starting in 1983, semifinals and a final was added to follow the round-robin stage.

When the number of participating nations increased, the championship was split up in two groups from 2003 onwards, A and B, with the better teams in Group A. The winner of Group B for some years played a game against the least successful team of Group A to determine qualification for Group A for next year, but in 2016, 2017, and 2018 winning Group B has been directly qualifying for group A for the following year while the last placed team of Group A is automatically relegated to Group B.

TV broadcasting[edit]

The interest is biggest in Sweden, Finland and Russia.[9] For a few times now it has been shown on Eurosport 2.

The games can also be followed in any country by streaming on the Internet.

Results[edit]

No. Year Host
Final Venue Gold medal Result Silver medal Bronze medal Result Fourth place Teams
I 1957
Details
 Finland Helsinki Olympic Stadium
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
Decided by round-robin result Only three teams participated 3
II 1961
Details
 Norway N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
III 1963
Details
 Sweden N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
IV 1965
Details
 Soviet Union N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
Sweden
Sweden
Decided by round-robin result
Finland
4
V 1967
Details
 Finland N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
VI 1969
Details
 Sweden N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Only three teams participated 3
VII 1971
Details
 Sweden N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
VIII 1973
Details
 Soviet Union N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
IX 1975
Details
 Finland N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
X 1977
Details
 Norway N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
XI 1979
Details
 Sweden N/A
Soviet Union
Decided by round-robin result Sweden
Sweden

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
XII 1981
Details
 Soviet Union N/A Sweden
Sweden
Decided by round-robin result
Soviet Union

Finland
Decided by round-robin result Norway
Norway
4
XIII 1983
Details
 Finland Oulunkylä Ice Rink (Helsinki) Sweden
Sweden
9–3
Soviet Union

Finland
4–1 Norway
Norway
4
XIV 1985
Details
 Norway (Oslo)
Soviet Union
5–4
(a.e.t.)
Sweden
Sweden

Finland
6–2 Norway
Norway
5
XV 1987
Details
 Sweden Söderstadion (Stockholm) Sweden
Sweden
7–2
Finland

Soviet Union
11–3 Norway
Norway
5
XVI 1989
Details
 Soviet Union Moscow Olympic Stadium
Soviet Union
12–2
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
6–0 Norway
Norway
5
XVII 1991
Details
 Finland Oulunkylä Ice Rink (Helsinki)
Soviet Union
4–3 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
8–0 Norway
Norway
8
XVIII 1993
Details
 Norway Hamar Olympic Hall Sweden
Sweden
8–0 Russia
Russia
Norway
Norway
5–3
Finland
8
XIX 1995
Details
 United States John Rose Minnesota Oval (Roseville) Sweden
Sweden
6–4 Russia
Russia

Finland
3–2 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
8
XX 1997
Details
 Sweden Rocklunda IP (Västerås) Sweden
Sweden
10–5 Russia
Russia

Finland
9–3 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
9
XXI 1999
Details
 Russia Trud Stadium (Arkhangelsk) Russia
Russia
5–0
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
9–1 Norway
Norway
6
XXII 2001
Details
 Finland
 Sweden
Raksila Ice Rink (Oulu FIN) Russia
Russia
6–1 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
3–2 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
7
XXIII 2003
Details
 Russia Trud Stadium (Arkhangelsk) Sweden
Sweden
5–4 Russia
Russia
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
4–1
Finland
9
XXIV 2004
Details
 Sweden
 Hungary
Rocklunda IP (Västerås SWE)
Finland
5–4
(a.e.t.)
Sweden
Sweden
Russia
Russia
5–2 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
11
XXV 2005
Details
 Russia Trudovye Rezervy Stadium (Kazan) Sweden
Sweden
5–2 Russia
Russia
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
5–3
Finland
11
XXVI 2006
Details
 Sweden Zinkensdamms IP (Stockholm) Russia
Russia
3–2 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
7–4 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
12
XXVII 2007
Details
 Russia Khimik Stadium (Kemerovo) Russia
Russia
3–1 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
5–4
(a.e.t.)
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
12
XXVIII 2008
Details
 Russia Olympic Stadium (Moscow) Russia
Russia
6–1 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
8–3 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
13
XXIX 2009
Details
 Sweden ABB Arena Syd (Västerås) Sweden
Sweden
6–1 Russia
Russia

Finland
7–3 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
13
XXX 2010
Details
 Russia Ice Palace Krylatskoye (Moscow) Sweden
Sweden
6–5
(a.e.t.)
Russia
Russia

Finland
4–3
(a.e.t.)
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
11
XXXI 2011
Details
 Russia Trudovye Rezervy Stadium (Kazan) Russia
Russia
6–1
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
14–3 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
11
XXXII 2012
Details
 Kazakhstan Medeu (Almaty) Sweden
Sweden
5–4 Russia
Russia
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
10–5
Finland
14
XXXIII 2013
Details
 Sweden
 Norway
Arena Vänersborg (Vänersborg) Russia
Russia
4–3 Sweden
Sweden
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
6–3
Finland
14
XXXIV 2014
Details
 Russia Trud Stadium (Irkutsk) Russia
Russia
3–2 Sweden
Sweden
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
5–3
Finland
17
XXXV 2015
Details
 Russia Arena Yerofey (Khabarovsk) Russia
Russia
5–3 Sweden
Sweden
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
8–6
Finland
16
XXXVI 2016
Details
 Russia Trud Stadium (Ulyanovsk) Russia
Russia
6–1
Finland
Sweden
Sweden
4–0 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
18
XXXVII 2017
Details
 Sweden Göransson Arena (Sandviken) Sweden
Sweden
4–3 Russia
Russia

Finland
11–1 Norway
Norway
18
XXXVIII 2018
Details
 Russia
 China
Arena Yerofey (Khabarovsk) Russia
Russia
5–4 Sweden
Sweden

Finland
8–4 Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
16
XXXIX 2019
Details
 Sweden Arena Vänersborg (Vänersborg)
XXXX 2020
Details
 Russia Irkutsk
Kyrgyzstan and Japan were the newcomers in 2012. Here, the Kyrgyzstan team defend their goal when Japan is about to make a corner stroke. Kyrgyzstan has yet to make another world championship appearance.

Medal table[edit]

Countries in italics no longer compete at the World Championships.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Soviet Union142117
2 Sweden1218838
3 Russia119121
4 Finland182130
5 Norway0112
6 Kazakhstan0066
Totals (6 nations)383838114

Consecutive wins[edit]

The most consecutive gold medals were won by the Soviet Union with 11. Russia has won four consecutive gold medals and Sweden has won three consecutive gold medals.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Finnish Bandy Federation, in English". Finnish Bandy Federation. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  2. ^ "Somali team seeking to be masters of ice sport bandy", BBC-online, 3 January 2014.
  3. ^ 35-й чемпионат мира по хоккею с мячом стартовал в Хабаровске,(in Russian), Retrieved 5 February 2016
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ [3]
  7. ^ [4]
  8. ^ A poster showing the flags of the registered teams for the 2011 tournament, including that of Australia, which in the end didn't show up
  9. ^ World Championship will be broadcast on main TV channels

External links[edit]