Bank of Bigheart

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Bank of Bigheart
BankOfBigheartBuilding2.jpg
Bank of Bigheart
Location Barnsdall, Oklahoma
Coordinates 36°33′42.87″N 96°9′41.26″W / 36.5619083°N 96.1614611°W / 36.5619083; -96.1614611Coordinates: 36°33′42.87″N 96°9′41.26″W / 36.5619083°N 96.1614611°W / 36.5619083; -96.1614611
Built 1911
Architectural style Richardsonian Romanesque
MPS Richardsonian Romanesque Banks of Osage County TR
NRHP Reference # 84000311 [1]
Added to NRHP November 23, 1984

The Bank of Bigheart is a historic commercial building in the town of Barnsdall, Oklahoma. It originally housed the first bank in Barnsdall, which was originally named Bigheart, Oklahoma. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 23, 1984.

Construction[edit]

The building was constructed during the peak of the oil boom in Osage County. In April 1911 a tornado destroyed much of the town which was known as Bigheart at that time. (The name was changed in 1921). The building was constructed in 1911. The first floor of the building originally contained the Bank of Bigheart. The bank was renamed the Barnsdall State Bank in 1925.[2] which remained in the building until 1976, when it relocated to the present-day American Heritage Bank building. It has since contained a variety of businesses including a drug store and tavern. The second floor was originally used for professional offices and continued to do so at least through the 1980s, but has been vacant since then. It is the oldest surviving commercial building in Barnsdall. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 23, 1984.

According to the Bigheart Times, Other tenants in the building have included the town of Barnsdall, which used it as a city hall and as a library, International Order of Oddfellows (IOOF) and its auxiliary( the Rebekah Lodge). The ground floor currently has two retail tenants: a flower shop called Twig and Berries, and The Hen House, which sells handcrafted items, as well as fresh eggs. In 2014, Cliff Taylor, the current owner of the building began a renovation program by replacing all of the windows on the second floor.[2]

Architecture[edit]

The building is an example of late Richardsonian Romanesque architecture. It is built of native sandstone. The lower level features large arched windows typical of Richardsonian Romanesque buildings. The upper story has smaller deeply set window with straight tops which are arranged in ribbon-like fashion, while the roof line features crenelations, both of which are characteristic of Richardsonian Romanesque. It is one of four small bank buildings built in Richardsonian Romanesque style in Osage County, Oklahoma during 1904-1911.[3] The others are Bank of Hominy, Bank of Burbank, and Osage Bank of Fairfax.

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "Investing in a classic." Bigheart Times. September 10, 2014. Accessed April 20, 2014.
  3. ^ Claudia Ahmad and George Carney (December 1983). "National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Submission: Richardsonian Romanesque Banks of Osage County TR" (pdf). National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-02-12.