Banksia armata var. armata

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Banksia armata var. armata
Banksia armata gnangarra 02.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Proteales
Family: Proteaceae
Genus: Banksia
Subgenus: Banksia subg. Banksia
Series: Banksia ser. Dryandra
Species: B. armata
Variety: B. armata var. armata
Trinomial name
Banksia armata (R.Br.) A.R.Mast & K.R.Thiele var. armata

Banksia armata var. armata is a variety of shrub endemic to Western Australia.

Description[edit]

B. armata var. armata grows as a spreading shrub, up to three metres in height, with deeply serrated leaves and a bright yellow inflorescence.[1][2][3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It occurs throughout much of the south-west. The main distribution is between Perth and Albany, but it also occurs near Mount Lesueur in the north. It grows amongst open woodland or heath, on rocky soils.[3][4]

Taxonomy[edit]

Specimens of B. armata were first collected at King George Sound in December 1801 by Robert Brown. Brown published a description of the species in 1810, naming it Dryandra armata; the specific epithet is from the Latin armatus ("armed") in reference to the sharply serrated leaves. Thirty years later, John Lindley published a purported new species, which he named Dryandra favosa.[5] This was accepted as a species by Carl Meissner in 1845,[6] but declared a taxonomic synonym of D. armata by him in 1856,[7] and the latter view was taken by George Bentham his 1870 Flora Australiensis.[8] In 1996, Alex George published D. armata var. ignicida, thereby invoking the autonym D. armata var.armata. George also refined the synonymy of D. favosa to this subspecies.[1] In 2007, all Dryandra species were transferred to Banksia by Austin Mast and Kevin Thiele;[9] hence the current name of this variety is Banksia armata (R.Br.) A.R.Mast & K.R.Thiele var. armata.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b George, Alex S. (1996). "New taxa and a new infrageneric classification in Dryandra". Nuytsia. 10 (2): 313–408. 
  2. ^ "Dryandra armata R.Br. var armata". Flora of Australia Online. Department of the Environment and Heritage, Australian Government. 
  3. ^ a b Cavanagh, Tony; Pieroni, Margaret (2006). The Dryandras. Melbourne: Australian Plants Society (SGAP Victoria); Perth: Wildflower Society of Western Australia. ISBN 1-876473-54-1. 
  4. ^ "Dryandra armata R.Br. var. armata". FloraBase. Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife. 
  5. ^ Lindley, John (1839). "A Sketch of the Vegetation of the Swan River Colony". Appendix to the first twenty-three volumes of Edwards's Botanical Register. London: James Ridgeway. 
  6. ^ Meissner, Carl (1845). "Dryandra". In Lehmann, Johann. Plantae Preissianae. Hamburg: Meissner. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 
  7. ^ Meissner, Carl (1856). "Dryandra". In de Candolle, A. P. Prodromus systematis naturalis regni vegetabilis. Retrieved 2007-09-14. 
  8. ^ Bentham, George (1870). "Banksia". Flora Australiensis. Volume. 5: Myoporineae to Proteaceae. London: L. Reeve & Co. pp. 541–562. 
  9. ^ Mast, Austin R.; Thiele, Kevin (2007). "The transfer of Dryandra R.Br. to Banksia L.f. (Proteaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 20 (1): 63–71. doi:10.1071/SB06016. 
  10. ^ "Banksia armata (R.Br.) A.R.Mast & K.R.Thiele var. armata". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. 

External links[edit]