IDEC SPORT

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IDEC SPORT
Groupama 3 under sails, South Britanny, front side view.jpg
Groupama 3 under sail.
Other namesGroupama 3
Banque Populaire VII
Lending Club 2
IDEC 3
Designer(s)VPLP
BuilderMultiplast (Vannes, France)
Launched7 June 2006
Owner(s)Groupama Sailing Team (2006–2013)
Banque Populaire (2013–2014)
Renaud Laplanche (2015)
IDEC (2015–)
Racing career
SkippersFranck Cammas ( (2006–2013))
Armel Le Cléac'h (2013)
Loïck Peyron (2014)
Renaud Laplanche (2015)
Francis Joyon (2015)
Notable victoriesJules Verne Trophy 2010
2010 Route du Rhum
2014 Route du Rhum
Jules Verne Trophy 2017
Route du Rhum 2018
Specifications
Displacement18 t (18 long tons; 20 short tons)
Length31.50 m (103.3 ft) (LOA)
Beam22.50 m (73.8 ft)
Draft5.70 m (18.7 ft)
Mast height41 m (135 ft)
Sail area828 m2 (8,910 sq ft)
Crew10
Groupama 3 in Saint-Malo, 2010

IDEC SPORT[1] (formerly Groupama 3, Banque Populaire VII, Lending Club 2, IDEC 3) is a racing sailing trimaran designed for transoceanic record-setting. She is one of the world's fastest ocean-going sailing vessels and the current holder of the Jules Verne Trophy for circumnavigation of the world. She was originally skippered by French yachtsman Franck Cammas, with a crew of ten and sponsored by the French insurance company Groupama. She is currently skippered by Françis Joyon.

Design[edit]

Groupama 3 was designed by VPLP and built by Multiplast in Vannes, France.[2]

Career[edit]

Groupama 3 was launched on June 7, 2006. She was the transatlantic record holder between 2007 and 2009.

During a first attempt for the Jules Verne Trophy (circumnavigation of the world) in 2008, Groupama 3 capsized off the coast of New-Zealand.

She was repaired in France and went for another attempt in 2009. Damage to the port hull led to the attempt being called off after 11 days, and the boat limped into Cape Town for repairs. She then returned to France

Groupama 3 began her third attempt and on January 31, 2010. On March 20, 2010, she became the fastest boat to sail around the world and set a record of 48 days, 7 hours 44 minutes and 52 seconds, improving on Orange II's performance from 2005 by more than 2 days.[3] She lost the record on January 7, 2012, to Banque Populaire V, a larger trimaran.[4]

In 2010, she was retrofitted for single-handed racing to take part of the transatlantic race Route du Rhum. In November 2010, Groupama 3 won the French single-handed transatlantic race Route du Rhum (between Brittany and Guadeloupe), with Frank Cammas at the helm, in 9 days and 14 hours, averaging 16.14 knots.

She was sponsored by French bank Banque Populaire to take part of 2014 Route du Rhum, which she won with skipper Loïck Peyron. In November 2014, Banque Populaire VII won Route du Rhum again, with Loick Peyron, in 7 days and 15 hours, beating the record by 2 hours and 10 minutes.

In 2015, French yachtsman Francis Joyon's sponsor IDEC announced that they now financed the boat.[5] Under this new sponsorship the boat was leased for six months to Renaud Laplanche, the CEO of Lending Club. The boat was restored from her shortened-mast single-handed configuration to a full crew configuration and named Lending Club 2.[6] Lending Club 2 set a new cross Channel record and a new trans-Pacific record.[7]

In September 2015 the boat's sponsorship changed to the IDEC Sport. The team set a new circumnavigation record in 2017 and won back the Jules Verne Trophy with a time of 40 days 23 hours 30 minutes 30 seconds.[8]

Records[edit]

2016 Jules Verne record[edit]

Francis Joyon takes possession of the former Groupama 3 on October 2, 2015, after three weeks of work at Multiplast, in Vannes.[11] He chooses an intermediate configuration between the initial power and a reduced rigging for solo races. Closer to the lightness and ergonomics sought alone, less versatile in particular in light winds, Joyon's choices will pay off during his two passages in the southern seas at the end of 2015 then at the end of 2016, with numerous records. With a crew reduced to six people, IDEC Sport presents itself as a challenger to beat the Jules-Verne Trophy,[12] owned by Loïck Peyron since 2011 in 45 days, 13 hours, 42 minutes and 53 seconds.

After an attempt in November 2016, with unfavorable weather in the doldrums and the South Atlantic, and a shock that slightly damaged her fin, Joyon set out again on December 16, 2016 to conquer the trophy. He arrived on January 26, 2017 with a new Around the world sailing record in 40 days 23 h 30 min 30 s.[13] During their 2016 attempt for the Jules-Verne Trophy, Francis Joyon and his crew [14] break numerous intermediate records: four have been formalized and are the subject of records duly certified by the WSSRC. [15]

They make a very fast crossing of the southern seas starting with the Indian Ocean,[14] covering 8091,73 miles in 10 days, maintaining an average of 809 miles per day. This episode began ahead of the front of a depression which moved at a speed corresponding to the boat's potential from South America to the Pacific Ocean. During 12 days, the wind remains port tack, blowing constantly at over 30 knots, an ideal configuration for speed records. Top speeds vary between 38 and 44 knots depending on the state of the sea. Due to bad seas, their speed dropped temporarily (29 knots and 700 miles / 24 h) before a new acceleration, pushing them back above the bar of 800 miles traveled daily.

After passing New Zealand and the Antimeridian, sailing port tack 205 degrees longitude (25 degrees West to Antimeridian) in the southern seas, Francis Joyon and his crew ended up jibing in the transition between two depressions, and manage to catch up with the weather system in front of them over the Pacific Ocean, setting off again at more than 30 knots daily average towards Cape Horn.

Francis Joyon rounds Cape Horn, 16 days after the beginning of this ride off of South America, and after a course of nearly 12,000 miles above 30 knots average (730, 16 miles / 24 hours over 16 days). He then signs a performance increase of 30 to 40% compared to Loïck Peyron's record 5 years earlier. Leaving the southern seas with a lead of 4 days 06 hours 35 min over Loïck Peyron's previous record, Francis Joyon and his crew regained the equivalent of 2,800 miles on the record during this episode.

The weather conditions around the world allowed them to optimize the course: 26,412 miles covered on the ground, at an average of 26.85 knots, for a theoretical course of 22,461 miles. Banque Populaire V had to cover almost 2600 more miles in 2015 ( 29,002 miles)

Distance records broken during the 2016 campaign[edit]

While the best day of Loïck Peyron's previous record was the only day above 800 miles from his record (811 miles over 24 hours, or 33.79 knots average), Francis Joyon maintains a speed above 800 daily miles for 10 consecutive days.

It thus improves a large number of progress records by a sailboat over a given period:

Skipper Reference start Distance

(miles)

speed

(knots)

speed

(miles/24 h)

Joyon best 24h december 29, 2016 00 894 37,3 894
best 48 h december 28, 2016 01 748,2 36,42 874,1
best 72 h december 30, 2016 02 617,7 36,36 872,57
best 4 days december 26, 2016 03 477,4 36,22 869,35
Joyon best 5 days december 27, 2016 04 312,57 35,94 862,51
best 6 days december 27, 2016 05 104,16 35,45 850,7
best 8 days december 26, 2016 06 525,14 33,99 815,64
best 10 days december 26, 2016 08 091,73 33,71 809,17
best 12 days december 26, 2016 09 369,03 32,53 780,75
Joyon best 16 days december 26, 2016 11 682,62 30,42 730,16

Other records broken during the 2016 campaign[edit]

  • Boat record and the second longest distance covered by a sailboat in 24 hours with 894 miles.
  • 6 consecutive days at an average of 850.7 miles / 24 h (35.45 knots)
  • Ushant-Cape Leeuwin 17 d 06 h 59 min 45 (time of Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record: 17 d 23 h 57 min)
  • Ushant-Tasmania 18 d 18 h 31 min (time of Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record: 20 d 07 h 11 min)
  • Ushant-Antiméridien 20 d 07 h 01 (time of Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record: 22 d 11 h 34 min)
  • Ushant-Cape Horn: 26 d 15 h 45 min (time of Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record: 30 d 22 h 19 min)
  • Ecuador - Cape Leeuwin: 11 d 12 h (time of Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record: 12 d 9 h 2 min)
  • Cape Agulhas-cape Leeuwin in 4 days 9 h 37 min 46 at an average speed of 35.08 knots over ground (3,705 miles) or 842 miles in 24 hours (6 days 8 min or 36% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)
  • Cape Leeuwin - Cape Horn in 9 d 08 h 46 min (12 d 22 h 22 min or 38% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)
  • Cape of Good Hope - Cape Horn in 13 d 20 h 13 min (19 d 00 h 31 min or 37% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)
  • Cape of Good Hope - Cape Leeuwin: 4 d 11 h 31 min (6 d 02 h 09 min or 36% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record in 2011)
  • Cap Leeuwin - Cape Horn in 9 d 08 h 46 min (12 d 22 h 22 min or 38% more for Loïck Peyron's previous record)
  • Indian Ocean: 5 d 21 h 7 min 45 s (WSSRC reference) (8 d 07 h 23 min or 41% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)
  • Pacific Ocean: 7 d 21 h 13 min 31 s (WSSRC reference) (10 d 15 h 07 min or 39% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)
  • Ecuador-Ecuador record: 29 d 9 h 10 min 55 s (WSSRC reference) (32 d 11 h 52 min or 11% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)
  • North Atlantic return record: 5 d 19 h 21 min (7 d 10 h 58 min or 25% more for Loïck Peyron during the 2011 record)

See also[edit]

Competitions and prizes
Other speed sailing records

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 12 November 2018. Retrieved 14 August 2017.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Maxi Groupama trimaran launched, 2006
  3. ^ http://www.cammas-groupama.com/en/
  4. ^ "Jules Verne Trophy taken by Maxi Banque Populaire V". Sail World. 7 January 2012. Retrieved 7 January 2012.
  5. ^ http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/idec-sport-a-new-life-for-a-legendary-boat/?lang=en
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 24 March 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ https://www.forbes.com/sites/miguelhelft/2015/06/16/renaud-laplanche-sails-full-speed-ahead/
  8. ^ "Francis Joyon - IDEC Sport". Jules Verne Trophy.
  9. ^ a b c d e Groupama 3 records on the WSSRC site Archived 25 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine>
  10. ^ "WSSR newsletter No 239. Banque Populaire 7. Singlehanded 24 hours. 28/02/14". www.sailspeedrecords.com. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  11. ^ "Launch of the maxi-trimaran IDEC Sport: the Jules Verne Trophy is becoming clearer for Francis Joyon". idecsport-sailing.com..
  12. ^ Dominic Bourgeois (14 October 2015). "Joyon: objective three days less!". voilesetvoiliers.com..
  13. ^ IDEC SPORT, ed. (26 January 2017). "Flash arrival Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT".
  14. ^ a b "Flash arrival Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT". adonnante.com..
  15. ^ François Lombard. "Records established for the Jules Verne Trophy". fralo.info..

External links[edit]

Records
Preceded by
Orange II with Bruno Peyron
Jules Verne Trophy
2010–2012
Succeeded by
Banque Populaire V with Loïck Peyron
Preceded by
IDEC SPORT with Francis Joyon
Jules Verne Trophy
2017-current
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
IDEC SPORT with Francis Joyon
Route du Rhum
2018-current
Succeeded by
Incumbent