Baosheng Dadi

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Baosheng Dadi
Baosheng.jpg
Old print sold in temples with a picture of Baosheng Dadi.
Simplified Chinese保生大帝

Baosheng Dadi is a Chinese god of medicine. He is worshiped in Chinese folk religion and Taoism. The god is most popular in Fujian and Taiwan.

Historical Personage[edit]

Wu Tao or Wu Ben[1] (吳本) was born in the village of Bailiao near Xiamen in Fujian Province, during the Song Dynasty in the year 979.[2] He was a skilled doctor and Taoist practitioner who was credited with performing medical miracles, including applying eye drops to a dragon’s eye and removing a foreign object from a tiger’s throat.[3] After his death in 1036, he began to be worshiped as a deity. His deified status was officially recognized by the Hongxi Emperor of the Ming Dynasty who conferred on him the title of “Imperial Inspector at Heavenly Gate, Miracle Doctor of Compassion Relief, Great Taoist Immortal, and the Long-lived, Unbounded, Life Protection Emperor (恩主昊天金闕御史慈濟醫靈妙道真君萬壽無極保生大帝)”.[4]

Worship[edit]

He is worshiped at many temples in Fujian and Taiwan,[5] including Dalongdong Baoan Temple (大龍峒保安宮) in Taipei. His birthday is celebrated with parades and festivals on the 15th day of the third lunar month.[6]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Chinese Mythology Portal:China

References[edit]

  1. ^ Li, C (2011). "Folk memory of Baosheng Dadi". Zhonghua yi shi za zhi (Beijing, China : 1980) [2011, 41(4):249-251]. 41: 249–51. PMID 22169495.
  2. ^ Pregadio, Fabrizio (2013). The Encyclopedia of Taoism. Routledge. p. 218. ISBN 9781135796341.
  3. ^ "Baosheng Emperor". Dalongdong Baoan Temple. Dalongdong Baoan Temple. Retrieved 2014-06-17.
  4. ^ Lin, Meirong. "Great Emperor Who Protects Life". Encyclopedia of Taiwan. Retrieved 2014-06-17.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Vermeer, Eduard B. (1990). Development and Decline of Fukien Province in the 17th and 18th Centuries. BRILL. pp. 397–416. ISBN 9789004091719.
  6. ^ Keeling, Stephen (2011). The Rough Guide to Taiwan. Penguin. p. 34. ISBN 9781405382878.