Barawana language

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Barawana
Baré
Mitua
Native toVenezuela, Brazil
Native speakers
240 (2011)[1]
Arawakan
Language codes
ISO 639-3bae
qth (Guiano)
 qqd (Marawá)
Glottologbare1276  Baré[2]
guin1258  Guinau[3]
mara1409  Maragua[4]

Barawana (Baré) is an Arawakan language of Venezuela and Brazil, where it is nearly extinct. It was spoken by the Baré people. Aikhenvald (1999) reports "just a few old speakers left" of Baré proper, and that the Guinau variety was extinct. Kaufman (1994) considers Baré proper, Guinau, and extinct Marawá to be distinct languages; Aikhenvald, dialects of a single languages. (Marawá is not the same language as Marawán.)

Baré is a generic name for a number of Arawakan languages in the area, including Mandahuaca, Guarequena, Baniwa, and Piapoco. Barawana is the language given this name in Kaufman, Aikhenvald, and Ethnologue. It is also known as Ibini (a typo for Ihini ~ Arihini?) and Mitua.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barawana at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Baré". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Guinau". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Maragua". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.