Barbara Ross-Lee

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Barbara Ross-Lee (born June 1, 1942, age 77) in Detroit, Michigan is a physician and the first African-American woman to become a medical school dean.[1][2][3] She majored in biology and chemistry at Wayne State University, graduating in 1965. Then, in 1969, she entered Michigan State University's College of Osteopathic Medicine. Ross-Lee then went on to open her own private family practice, teach as a professor, and hold other positions within the medical community, until 1993 when she was elected as the first woman dean of a medical school, at Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine. Ross-Lee continued to be an active member of the medical field, earning several awards and honors for her work and accomplishments.[4][5]

Life and education[edit]

Ross-Lee was born and raised in the housing projects of Detroit, and is the oldest of six children, including sister Diana Ross. Ross-Lee attended Wayne State University for her undergraduate education. She got married during her junior year, which prolonged graduation by a year.[5] Discouraged from majoring in human anatomy and pursuing medicine, Ross-Lee earned degrees in biology and chemistry in 1965. She then joined the National Teacher Corps, where she stayed until 1969. Now a single mother, she attended the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, graduating with her D.O. in 1973.[6][7][8][9] After opening her own private practice in family medicine, she later remarried to Edmond Beverly, who worked for the Michigan public schools. Together, they raised Ross-Lee's five children.[5]

Career[edit]

After graduating from medical school, Ross-Lee remained in Detroit working at her private practice for ten years.[5] She then took a position with the United States Department of Health and Human Services where she worked on medical education and people of color in medicine. She was the first osteopathic physician to receive the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship. In 1993, she was appointed the dean of the Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine at Ohio University, a position she held until 2001. During her tenure, she was known for innovating the curriculum. After leaving Heritage, she became the vice president of Health Sciences and Medical Affairs at the New York Institute of Technology; in 2002, she became dean of its New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.[6][7][8][9] She currently serves as the vice president of Health Sciences and Affairs at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, and continues to advocate for women and people of color in the medical field, as well as for the field of Osteopathic medicine.[5]

Honors and awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Changing the Face of Medicine | Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-07.[verification needed]
  2. ^ Ch, D. L.; ler. "Little Known Black History Fact: Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee". Black America Web. Retrieved 2016-03-07.[verification needed]
  3. ^ "Ross–Lee, Barbara". Contemporary Black Biography. Retrieved 2016-03-07.[verification needed]
  4. ^ "Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee's Biography". The HistoryMakers. Retrieved 2019-04-26.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Ross–Lee, Barbara | Encyclopedia.com". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2019-04-26.
  6. ^ a b "Changing the Face of Medicine | Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-07.
  7. ^ a b Fischler, Marcelle S. (2002-02-10). "LONG ISLAND JOURNAL; Diana Ross's Sister Tops Charts in Medicine". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-03-07.
  8. ^ a b Ch, D. L.; ler. "Little Known Black History Fact: Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee". Black America Web. Retrieved 2016-03-07.
  9. ^ a b "Ross–Lee, Barbara". Contemporary Black Biography. Retrieved 2016-03-07.