Barbara Wiedemann

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Barbara Wiedemann
Barbara Wiedemann reads at the 2009 Montgomery Bookfest
Barbara Wiedemann reads at the 2009 Montgomery Bookfest
Born (1945-10-30) October 30, 1945 (age 73)
Somerville, New Jersey

Barbara Wiedemann (born October 30, 1945) is an American poet. She has published one book of poetry, besides a number of poems in literary journals. She is the author of one monograph and co-editor of two critical studies. She was formerly a professor of English literature at Auburn University at Montgomery.[1]

Early life[edit]

Barbara Wiedemann was born on October 30, 1945, and grew up in upstate New York. She received her Ph.D. from the University of South Florida.[1]

Poetry[edit]

Wiedemann has published poems in a number of journals, including Kaleidoscope, Kerf, Poetry Motel, and Acorn.[citation needed] Three of her collections were published by Finishing Line Press: Half-Life of Love (2008), Sometime in October, and Death of a Pope and Other Poems (2012).[1][2]

Critical studies[edit]

Wiedemann has authored a critical study, Josephine Herbst’s Short Fiction: A Window to Her Life and Times, on the work of Josephine Herbst, the radical American writer, and is the co-editor of two books, Short Fiction: A Critical Companion and "My Name Was Martha": A Renaissance Woman's Autobiographical Poem. The latter is the first edition of a 1632 autobiographical poem, 110 lines long, by a woman called Martha Moulsworth—one of the first such poems in English, which was included in the seventh edition of the Norton Anthology of English Literature.[3]

Her essay on Hélène Cixous and Marguerite Duras, "The Search for an Authentic Voice: Hélène Cixous and Marguerite Duras", was reprinted in the collection Marguerite Duras Lives On.[4]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Wiedemann, Barbara (2008). Half-Life of Love. Finishing Line Press. ISBN 978-1-59924-144-9. (poetry).[5]
  • Wiedemann, Barbara (1998). Josephine Herbst’s Short Fiction: A Window to Her Life and Times. Susquehanna UP. ISBN 978-1-57591-007-9. (monograph).
  • Evans, Robert C.; Anne Little; Barbara Wiedemann (1997). Short Fiction: A Critical Companion. West Cornwall: Locust Hill Press. ISBN 978-0-933951-73-0. (edited collection).
  • Evans, Robert C.; Barbara Wiedemann (1993). "My Name Was Martha": A Renaissance Woman's Autobiographical Poem. West-Cornwall: Locust Hill Press. (monograph).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "AUM English professor's new book chronicles death of pope, life in Italy". August 29, 2013. Retrieved July 19, 2017.
  2. ^ Evans, Bob (19 October 2012). "Q&A: Author says poets should trust their own voice". Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved 24 October 2012.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ Martha Moulsworth, "The Memorandum of Martha Moulsworth, Widow," in Abrams, M. H. (2000). Norton Anthology of English Literature. 1 (7 ed.). New York: Norton. pp. 1552–55, A–30. ISBN 978-0-393-97566-6.
  4. ^ Ricouart, Janine (1998). Marguerite Duras Lives On. UP of America. ISBN 978-0-7618-1206-7.
  5. ^ Reviewed in Latham, Irene (September 2008). "Rev. of Barbara Wiedemann, Half-Life of Love". Alabama Writers' Forum. Retrieved 2016-03-28.
  6. ^ For reviews of the book, see Norbrook, David (December 1994). "Rev. of "My Name was Martha": A Renaissance Woman's Autobiographical Poem". Notes and Queries. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 41 (4): 566. |access-date= requires |url= (help) and Haslem, Lori Schroeder (Spring 1996). "Rev of "My Name Was Martha": A Renaissance Woman's Autobiographical Poem". Renaissance Quarterly. 49 (1): 170. doi:10.2307/2863301.

External links[edit]