Barbourmeade, Kentucky

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Barbourmeade, Kentucky
Location of Barbourmeade in Jefferson County, Kentucky
Location of Barbourmeade in Jefferson County, Kentucky
Barbourmeade is located in Kentucky
Barbourmeade
Barbourmeade
Location within the state of Kentucky
Barbourmeade is located in the United States
Barbourmeade
Barbourmeade
Barbourmeade (the United States)
Coordinates: 38°18′1″N 85°35′59″W / 38.30028°N 85.59972°W / 38.30028; -85.59972Coordinates: 38°18′1″N 85°35′59″W / 38.30028°N 85.59972°W / 38.30028; -85.59972
CountryUnited States
StateKentucky
CountyJefferson
Government
 • TypeCommission
 • MayorBryan Coomer
Area
 • Total0.39 sq mi (1.02 km2)
 • Land0.39 sq mi (1.02 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
630 ft (192 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,218
 • Estimate 
(2016)[1]
1,256
 • Density3,088/sq mi (1,192.1/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP Code
40241
Area code(s)502
FIPS code21-03556
GNIS feature ID0486328
Websitebarbourmeade.org

Barbourmeade is a home rule-class city[2] in Jefferson County, Kentucky, United States. It was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1962.[3] The population was 1,218 at the 2010 census.[4]

The community derives its name from Thomas and Richard Barbour, early settlers for whom Barbour Lane is named.[5] Barbourmeade incorporated as a city in October 1962, with a population of 150.[6][7]

History[edit]

Present-day Barbourmeade is part of the loosely defined historic community known as Springdale, after the farm that stood on the south side of Brownsboro Road beginning in 1830.[8] Though it is not a formally recognized neighborhood or district within Louisville, nor does it have official boundaries, older businesses in the community still retain the Springdale name.[9]

Barbour Lane, which runs though the middle of the community, was originally the entry drive to the Barbour house,[8] which sat on the Barbour family's 500-acre tract of land between Brownsboro Road and River Road.[10] The intersection of present-day Barbour Lane and Brownsboro Road, then a toll road known as the Louisville-Brownsboro Turnpike, was home to a gristmill, grocery and blacksmith shop as far back as 1879, as well as a tavern known as the Seven Mile House for its location from downtown Louisville.[8] This intersection remains a commercial hub for the immediate community, serviced by a convenience store and gas station (a Convenient Food Mart, a Dairy Mart and currently a Circle K), dry cleaner, liquor store, animal hospital and automotive shop. Springdale Presbyterian Church was established in 1882, with much of its present-day structure constructed in 1964.[11]

Beginning in the late 19th century until it was subdivided in the 1950s, much of present-day Barbourmeade and the surrounding portions of Louisville's East End were occupied by potato farms. Farmers from the area were instrumental in organizing the St. Matthews Produce Exchange, the second-largest potato shipper in the country, located in nearby St. Matthews, known locally as "the potato capital of the world."[12] Among these farmers was John "The Potato King" Stutzenberger, Sr., said at the time to be "one of Jefferson County's best known-farmers," and whose family farm occupied a large portion of present-day Barbourmeade.[13] The area was described in 1941 as home to "Jefferson County's most fertile land and least experienced farmers," owing to the influx of wealthy hobby farmers from the city.[14]

After World War II, potato production in the area declined and farm acreages in Springdale and along Brownsboro Road were reduced or sold off. In 1953, Stutzenberger himself blamed the decline in American potato consumption on "diet propaganda."[15] That year, an Oldham County developer named Joe Wilhoyte purchased a 45-acre tract of farmland at Brownsboro Road and Barbour Lane from A.D. Stutzenberger and his sister Anna Hahn, two children of John Stutzenberger, Sr. A.D. Stutzenberger was an amateur farmer, author and English instructor at the Kentucky Military Institute.[16][17]

The Barbourmeade subdivision was platted that year from the farmland Wilhoyte had purchased, with many of the original streets given Spanish and Italian names. The suffix "-meade" derives from a poetic variation on the Old English word "mead," referring to a meadow or pasture.[18] The first new single-family home constructions went on the market in 1953.[19] The housing stock consists of a variety of popular postwar styles, including Colonial Revival, ranch-style, split-levels and Cape Cods.[20] Along with nearby Plantation, Barbourmeade was one of the earliest residential developments in the area.[8]

To accommodate the growing population in the area, Jefferson County Public Schools opened Norton Elementary School in 1967.[21]

In 1999, Barbourmeade annexed the neighboring community of Brownsboro Gardens after a protracted legal battle with Louisville-Jefferson County relating to a metro-wide ban on annexations.[22]

Geography[edit]

Barbourmeade is located in northeastern Jefferson County at 38°18′1″N 85°35′59″W / 38.30028°N 85.59972°W / 38.30028; -85.59972 (38.300219, -85.599695).[23] It is bordered to the northeast by Brownsboro Farm, to the southeast by Manor Creek, Broeck Pointe and Goose Creek, to the west by Spring Valley, and to the north, east, and south by Louisville. Interstate 71 runs along the northern border of Barbourmeade (but with no direct access), and Kentucky Route 22 (Brownsboro Road) forms part of the southern border. Downtown Louisville is 10 miles (16 km) to the southwest, and Crestwood is 8 miles (13 km) to the northeast up Route 22.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Barbourmeade has a total area of 0.39 square miles (1.02 km2), all land.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970884
19801,03817.4%
19901,40235.1%
20001,260−10.1%
20101,218−3.3%
Est. 20161,256[1]3.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[24]

As of the census[25] of 2000, there were 1,260 people, 506 households, and 400 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,908.7 people per square mile (1,131.4/km²). There were 516 housing units at an average density of 1,191.2 per square mile (463.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.87% White, 2.38% Black or African American, 0.95% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.63% of the population.

There were 506 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.7% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 33.7% from 45 to 64, and 20.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $71,711, and the median income for a family was $78,414. Males had a median income of $56,563 versus $36,458 for females. The per capita income for the city was $32,865. About 0.5% of families and 0.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under the age of eighteen or sixty-five or over.

Arts and culture[edit]

Omnicron Records, a small record label, was based in Barbourmeade in the mid-1990s. Their releases included the debut album by Hotel Roy, the first commercially available recordings of future My Morning Jacket frontman Jim James.[26]

Notable people[edit]

Former basketball player and coach Wade Houston and his son, professional basketball player Allan Houston, lived in Barbourmeade from 1986 to 1989 while the younger Houston attended nearby Ballard High School.[27]

Transportation[edit]

Brownsboro Road and its predecessor, the turnpike, have long been the primary means for accessing Barbourmeade, first by horse and carriage, and then by automobile. The hilly terrain and sharp turns on Brownsboro Road crossing Goose Creek make accessing it by bicycle or on foot difficult. A Louisville and Interuban Railroad line serving Brownsboro Road was planned in the early 1910s, but never came to fruition.[28]

On April 3, 2015, heavy rains washed away an old stone culvert over Goose Creek, just west of Barbourmeade, causing a cave-in on Brownsboro Road and cutting off the city from Interstates 71 and 264, and commercial centers located to the west. The road was reopened after five months.[29]

Within the city, pedestrians, cyclists and automobiles share the roads. Pedestrians generally walk facing traffic.[30] In 2006, Barbourmeade received a Safe Routes to School grant from the state of Kentucky to upgrade pedestrian facilities for students walking and biking to Norton Elementary.[31]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  2. ^ "Summary and Reference Guide to House Bill 331 City Classification Reform" (PDF). Kentucky League of Cities. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  3. ^ Commonwealth of Kentucky. Office of the Secretary of State. Land Office. "Barbourmeade, Kentucky". Accessed 15 July 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Barbourmeade city, Kentucky". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  5. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1994). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 13.
  6. ^ "Kentucky Land Office database". Kentucky Secretary of State. Archived from the original on 2012-06-09. Retrieved 2011-11-17.
  7. ^ ""Barbourmeade Now County's Newest City"". Louisville Courier-Journal. October 5, 1962. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  8. ^ a b c d Tobe, Carol Brenner. Worthington and Springdale. Charleston, South Carolina. ISBN 1467112941. OCLC 889524853.
  9. ^ "Auto Repairs in Louisville, KY". Springdale Automotive. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  10. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  11. ^ "History". Springdale Presbyterian Church. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  12. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
  13. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  14. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
  15. ^ "Fred Stutzenberger obituary". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  16. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  17. ^ "Albert Daniel Stutzenberger Obituary". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  18. ^ "mead | Origin and meaning of mead by Online Etymology Dictionary". www.etymonline.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  19. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  20. ^ "Home". Barbourmeade Ky. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  21. ^ "List of public schools in Louisville, Kentucky", Wikipedia, 2019-06-19, retrieved 2019-07-01
  22. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  23. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  24. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  25. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  26. ^ "Omnicron Records - Louisville Punk/Hardcore History". history.louisvillehardcore.com. Retrieved 2019-06-30.
  27. ^ "Ancestry.com". www.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  28. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  29. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.
  30. ^ "Barbourmeade Newsletter | December 2007" (PDF).
  31. ^ "Clipping from The Courier-Journal". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-07-03.