Barcaldine Power Station

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Barcaldine Power Station
CountryAustralia
LocationBarcaldine, Queensland.
Coordinates23°33′09″S 145°18′51″E / 23.55250°S 145.31417°E / -23.55250; 145.31417Coordinates: 23°33′09″S 145°18′51″E / 23.55250°S 145.31417°E / -23.55250; 145.31417
StatusOperational
Owner(s)Ergon Energy Queensland
Thermal power station
Primary fuelGas
TypeSteam turbine, gas turbine
Combined cycle?yes
Power generation
Nameplate capacity55 MW

The Barcaldine Power Station is a combined-cycle power station in Barcaldine, Queensland. Its NEMMCO registered capacity as of January 2009 was 55 MW.

According to the Geoscience Australia database,[1] it is also known as the Len Wishaw power station and consists of a 38 MW gas turbine and a 15MW steam turbine. The steam turbine at the power station is to be taken offline.[2]

The power station was built by Energy Equity Corporation, with the gas turbine being completed in 1995 and the steam turbine added in 1999.[3] The station had originally been planned for Blackall.[4] Enertrade acquired the station and associated gas pipeline in June 2003.[5] With the dissolution of Enertrade in May 2007, the station and pipeline were acquired by Ergon Energy Queensland Pty Ltd.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Operating fossil fuel plants Archived August 21, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ 'Green' power plant changes puzzle Barcaldine Mayor. ABC News. 29 May 2008. Accessed on 10 January 2009.
  3. ^ A Life Cycle Assessment of the Queensland Electricity Grid Archived September 14, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. CCSD. February 2003. Accessed on 10 January 2009.
  4. ^ Update on the Gilmore Gasfield Project Archived July 25, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Queensland Petroleum Symposium. 1994. Accessed on 10 January 2009.
  5. ^ Report on NEM Generator Costs 2007 Archived July 22, 2008, at the Wayback Machine ACIL Tasman. 6 June 2007. Accessed on 10 January 2009.
  6. ^ Sectoral Changes Archived December 6, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. OGOC. 1 December 2008. Accessed on 10 January 2009.