Barney Stanley

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Barney Stanley
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1962
Barney Stanley.jpg
Stanley as a member of the Calgary Tigers
Born (1893-01-01)January 1, 1893
Paisley, ON, CAN
Died May 16, 1971(1971-05-16) (aged 77)
Edmonton, AB, CAN
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Forward
Defence
Shot Left
Played for Vancouver Millionaires
Calgary Tigers
Regina Capitals
Edmonton Eskimos
Chicago Black Hawks
Playing career 1911–1929

Russell "Barney" Stanley (January 1, 1893 – May 16, 1971)[1] was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who played for the Vancouver Millionaires of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) and the Calgary Tigers, Regina Capitals and Edmonton Eskimos of the Western Canada Hockey League (WCHL). He was the second head coach of the Chicago Black Hawks of the National Hockey League (NHL), appearing as a player in one game for the team. He won the Stanley Cup with the Millionaires in 1915 and was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.[2]

Playing career[edit]

Stanley was born in Paisley, Ontario, the son of a dairy farmer. He moved west to Medicine Hat, Alberta at 17 to play hockey before settling in Edmonton.[3] He joined the Edmonton Maritimers in 1911–12, then spent the next three seasons as both a player and coach for the Edmonton Dominions and Albertas, all of the Alberta Senior Hockey League. Stanley turned professional in 1915, joining the Vancouver Millionaires of the PCHA.[4] Stanley scored seven goals in his first five regular season contests with Vancouver,[5] of which his first professional goal, in his first game, was assisted by Cyclone Taylor.[4] He won the Stanley Cup with the Millionaires in 1915 as they defeated the Ottawa Senators of the National Hockey League for the Canadian championship.[3][6] Stanley scored four goals in the third and deciding game of the series.[4]

Stanley was a Second Team All-Star with the Millionaires in 1918 and remained with the team until the end of the 1919–20 season.[4] He then fought to regain his amateur status so that he could take on the role of player-coach with the Edmonton Eskimos of Alberta's Big-4 League.[7] He left the Eskimos after one year to join the Calgary Tigers and in 1921 once again turned professional as the Tigers joined the newly formed Western Canada Hockey League.[4] He scored 26 goals in 24 games for the Tigers in 1921–22 and was named a league all-star on right wing. His rights were sold to the Regina Capitals following the season where served as player-coach and was again named all-star right wing.[8] After two seasons in Regina, he returned to the Eskimos for two more.[5] As player-coach for the Eskimos, Stanley led the team to the top record in the league in 1925–26.[9]

Following the collapse of the WCHL in 1926, Stanley purchased the Eskimos and brought them into the newly formed Prairie Hockey League.[10] Before the season began, however, he sold the team and joined the Winnipeg Maroons.[11] He purchased an ownership stake in the franchise, and signed on as a defenceman and coach for the American Hockey Association team.[12]

He was hired by the Chicago Black Hawks to be their manager and head coach for the 1927–28 NHL season.[9] Stanley managed the club for only 23 games as the team replaced him following a 4–17–2 start to the season, but not before appearing in one regular season contest as a player with the team.[4] Stanley returned to the AHA, playing his final season of hockey with the Minneapolis Millers before retiring in 1929.[4] He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Stanley and his wife Muriel Frances (née Sparling) had four children: son Don and daughters Isobel, Dorothy and Frances. Following the death in 1951 of his first wife, Stanley married Margaret (Greta) Muir. He had three brothers and a sister.[13] His son was also a hockey player and was a member of Canada's 1950 world championship team while his nephew Allan is also a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame.[8]

Following his arrival in Edmonton, Stanley became involved in the Dairy industry. He first joined the Edmonton City Dairy in 1913, and remained with the firm for 11 years while he remained an active hockey player.[14] He purchased a share in a dairy farm in 1924,[15] and joined the Northern Alberta Dairy Pool as an assistant manager in 1929 following the conclusion of his playing career. In 1944 he became the general manager of the pool.[14] He held the position until his retirement in 1961.[13]

Remaining active in hockey, Stanley coached the Edmonton Poolers junior team between 1929 and 1931.[8] He was a member of the hockey committee of the Edmonton Exhibition Association when the Flyers won the Allan Cup national senior championship in 1948.[13] Stanley also designed one of the sport's first hockey helmets, presented to the NHL's board of governors without interest after Chicago's Dick Irvin suffered a fractured skull during a game.[8] A proponent of youth involvement in sport, Stanley served two years as president of Edmonton's junior baseball league,[16] and was also president of the Edmonton and District Hockey Association into the 1940s.[17]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1914–15 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 5 7 1 8 0 3 5 1 6 0
1915–16 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 14 6 6 12 9
1916–17 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 23 28 18 46 9
1917–18 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 18 11 6 17 9 7 3 0 3 9
1918–19 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 20 10 6 16 19 2 0 0 0 0
1919–20 Edmonton Eskimos Big-4 12 10 12 22 20 2 0 1 1 5
1920–21 Calgary Tigers Big-4 15 11 10 21 5
1921–22 Calgary Tigers WCHL 24 26 5 31 17 2 0 0 0 0
1922–23 Regina Capitals WCHL 29 14 7 21 10 2 1 0 1 2
1923–24 Regina Capitals WCHL 30 15 11 26 27 2 1 0 1 0
1924–25 Edmonton Eskimos WCHL 25 12 5 17 36
1925–26 Edmonton Eskimos WHL 29 14 8 22 47 2 1 0 1 2
1926–27 Winnipeg Maroons AHA 35 8 8 16 78 3 0 0 0 2
1927–28 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1928–29 Minneapolis Millers AHA 40 8 5 13 34 4 1 0 1 2
PCHA totals 80 62 37 99 46 12 8 1 9 9
WCHL totals 137 81 36 117 137 8 3 0 3 4
NHL totals 1 0 0 0 0

Coaching record[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GC W L T Finish GC W L T Result
1927–28 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 23 4 17 2
NHL totals 23 4 17 2

References[edit]

  • Hockey Hall of Fame (2003). Honoured Members: Hockey Hall of Fame. Bolton, Ontario: Fenn Publishing. ISBN 1-55168-239-7. 
  1. ^ TOTAL HOCKEY - THE OFFICIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE, Second Edition, copyright 2000, pg 813. Also www.nhl.com player page http://blackhawks.nhl.com/club/player.htm?id=8449156
  2. ^ Hockey Hall of Fame 2003, p. 58.
  3. ^ a b c Podnieks, Andrew (2003). Players: The ultimate A–Z guide of everyone who has ever played in the NHL. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. p. 817. ISBN 0-385-25999-9. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Barney Stanley biography". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
  5. ^ a b "Barney Stanley playing statistics". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
  6. ^ "Vancouver Millionaires 1914–15 Stanley Cup champions". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
  7. ^ "Calgary Tigers – a team of legends". Edmonton Oilers Heritage Foundation. Retrieved 2010-07-03. [dead link]
  8. ^ a b c d Duplacey, James; Zweig, Eric (2010). Official Guide to the Players of the Hockey Hall of Fame. Firefly Books. p. 483. ISBN 1-55407-662-5. 
  9. ^ a b "Stanley as manager". Montreal Gazette. 1927-04-05. p. 17. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
  10. ^ Gibson, Dick (1927-02-03). "Tips & Tales". Border Cities Star. p. 18. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  11. ^ "White gets all Eskimo players with franchise". Calgary Daily Herald. 1926-11-06. p. 34. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  12. ^ "'Peg Maroons well fortified". Saskatoon Phoenix. 1926-11-06. p. 9. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  13. ^ a b c Flemming, Don (1971-05-17). "Stanley did leave a legend". Edmonton Journal. p. 52. Retrieved 2011-11-20. 
  14. ^ a b "Dairy head, Barney Stanley retires soon". Edmonton Journal. 1960-11-30. p. 61. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  15. ^ "Caps to start rink workouts here tomorrow". Regina Leader. 1924-11-11. p. 12. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  16. ^ "Baseball men urging city to buy Roche's Renfrew lease". Edmonton Journal. 1941-02-06. p. 11. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  17. ^ "Stanley heads capital hockey". Calgary Herald. 1940-11-02. p. 6. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Pete Muldoon
Head coach of the Chicago Black Hawks
1927–28
Succeeded by
Hughie Lehman