Barry Links railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Barry Links National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Machair Bharraidh[1]
Barry Links station, August 2019.jpg
Location
PlaceBarry
Local authorityAngus
Coordinates56°29′36″N 2°44′44″W / 56.4932°N 2.7456°W / 56.4932; -2.7456Coordinates: 56°29′36″N 2°44′44″W / 56.4932°N 2.7456°W / 56.4932; -2.7456
Grid referenceNO542336
Operations
Station codeBYL
Managed byAbellio ScotRail
Number of platforms2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2014/15Increase 60
2015/16Increase 68
2016/17Decrease 24
2017/18Increase 52
2018/19Increase 122
History
Original companyDundee and Arbroath Railway
Pre-groupingCaledonian Railway
Post-groupingLMS
31 July 1851Opened as Barry[2]
1 April 1919Renamed as Barry Links[2]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  • Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Barry Links from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
The station in 1974

Barry Links railway station lies south of the village of Barry, west of Carnoustie in Angus, Scotland.

The station is managed by Abellio ScotRail and is on the Edinburgh to Aberdeen Line. In 2017/18, Barry Links was the least used train station in the UK with just 52 entries and exits.[3]

History[edit]

The station was opened on 31 July 1851 by Dundee and Arbroath Railway, and was named Barry.[2] The station was renamed to its current name on 1 April 1919.[2]

In the Strategic Rail Authority's 2002/03 financial year, only three fare-paying people (excluding season ticket holders) boarded trains at Barry Links station, and five disembarked, making it the least-used station in the United Kingdom, tied with Gainsborough Central. Since then, there has been a modest increase in passenger numbers: 26 entries/exits in 2004/05 (third lowest in the UK), 28 in 2005/06 (third lowest) and 44 in 2006/07 (fifth lowest). In the 2011/12 statistics, Barry Links had the seventh lowest passenger numbers. The low numbers reflect the fact that the current service (May 2015 timetable) is very sparse – only two trains per day in total stop at the station (one each way, Mondays to Saturdays only), limiting use and growth.[4] In the 2016/17 statistics, Barry Links again became the least used station in Britain, receiving only 24 entries and exits. In the May 2019 timetable change the service will double now receiving two southbound trains in the morning and two northbound trains in the evening.[5][6]

Services[edit]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Monifieth   Abellio ScotRail
Edinburgh to Aberdeen Line
Mondays-Saturdays only
  Golf Street
  Abellio ScotRail
Glasgow to Aberdeen Line
Mondays-Saturdays only
 
  Historical railways  
Buddon
Line open; station closed
  Caledonian Railway and North British Railway
Dundee and Arbroath Railway
  Carnoustie
Line and station open

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brailsford 2017, Gaelic/English Station Index.
  2. ^ a b c d Butt, page 28
  3. ^ "Estimates of station usage | ORR Data Portal". dataportal.orr.gov.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2020.
  4. ^ GB National Rail Timetable 229 - Edinburgh and Glasgow Queen Street - Perth, Inverness, Dundee, Aberdeen, Dyce and Inverurie, May - December 2015Network Rail; Retrieved 18-08-2015
  5. ^ Estimates of station usage | ORR Data Portal
  6. ^ "Scottish railway station is least used in Britain". BBC News. Retrieved 1 December 2017.

Sources[edit]

  • Brailsford, Martyn, ed. (December 2017) [1987]. Railway Track Diagrams 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (6th ed.). Frome: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-9-8.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137.
  • Jowett, Alan (2000). Jowett's Nationalised Railway Atlas (1st ed.). Penryn, Cornwall: Atlantic Transport Publishers. ISBN 978-0-906899-99-1. OCLC 228266687.

External links[edit]