Barry Lopez

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Barry Lopez
Born(1945-01-06)January 6, 1945
Port Chester, New York, U.S.
DiedDecember 25, 2020(2020-12-25) (aged 75)
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.
Alma materUniversity of Notre Dame (BA, MA)
Notable worksOf Wolves and Men (1978)
Arctic Dreams (1986)

Barry Holstun Lopez (January 6, 1945 – December 25, 2020) was an American author, essayist, nature writer, and fiction writer whose work is known for its humanitarian and environmental concerns. In a career spanning over 50 years, he visited over 80 countries, and wrote extensively about distant and exotic landscapes including the Arctic wilderness, exploring the relationship between human cultures and nature. He won the National Book Award for Nonfiction for Arctic Dreams (1986) and his Of Wolves and Men (1978) was a National Book Award finalist.[1] He was a contributor to magazines including Harper's Magazine, National Geographic, and The Paris Review.

Early life[edit]

Lopez was born Barry Holstun Brennan on January 6, 1945, in Port Chester, New York,[2][3] to Mary Frances (née Holstun) and John Brennan. His family moved to Reseda, California after the birth of his brother, Dennis, in 1948. He attended grade school at Our Lady of Grace during this time.[4] His parents divorced in 1950, after which his mother married Adrian Bernard Lopez, a businessman, in 1955. Adrian Lopez adopted Barry and his brother, and they both took his surname.[3]

When Lopez was 11, his family relocated to Manhattan, where he attended the Loyola School, graduating in 1962.[3] As a young man, Lopez considered becoming a Catholic priest or a Trappist monk[3] before attending the University of Notre Dame, earning undergraduate and graduate degrees there in 1966 and 1968.[3] He also attended New York University and the University of Oregon.[2]

Career and works[edit]

Lopez's essays, short stories, reviews and opinion pieces began to appear in 1966.[5] In his career of over 50 years, he traveled to over 80 countries, writing extensively about distant and exotic landscapes including the Arctic wilderness, exploring the relationships between human cultures and wild nature.[3][6] Through his works, he also highlighted the harm caused by human actions on nature.[7] He was a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine and a contributor to many magazines including National Geographic, The Paris Review, and Outside.[3][8] Until 1981, he was also a landscape photographer.[9] In 2002, he was elected a fellow of The Explorers Club.[10]

Arctic Dreams (1986) describes five years in the Canadian Arctic, where Lopez worked as a biologist.[3][11] Robert Macfarlane, reviewing the book in The Guardian, describes him as "the most important living writer about wilderness".[11] In The New York Times, Michiko Kakutani argued that Arctic Dreams "is a book about the Arctic North in the way that Moby-Dick is a novel about whales".[12]

A number of Lopez's works for children, including Giving Birth to Thunder, Sleeping with His Daughter (1978), make use of Native American legends, including characters such as Coyote.[13] Crow and Weasel (1990) thematizes the importance of metaphor, which Lopez described in an interview as one of the definitive "passion[s]" of humanity.[14]

James I. McClintock describes Lopez as an admirer of Wendell Berry.[15] McClintock further observes, referring to Arctic Dreams, that Lopez "conjoin[s] ecological science and romantic insight".[16] Slovic identifies "careful structure, euphony, and an abundance of particular details" as central characteristics of Lopez's work.[17]

His final work published during his lifetime was Horizon (2019), an autobiographical telling of his travels over his lifetime.[18] The Guardian describes the book as "a contemporary epic, at once pained and urgent, personal and oracular".[19]

An archive of Lopez's manuscripts and other work has been established at Texas Tech University,[20] where he was the university's Visiting Distinguished Scholar.[10][21] He also taught at universities including Columbia University, Eastern Washington University, University of Iowa, and Carleton College, Minnesota.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

Fiction[edit]

Nonfiction[edit]

Anthology[edit]

Edited volumes[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Lopez's first marriage to Sandra Landers in 1967 ended in a divorce in 1998. He married Debra Gwartney in 2007.[3] After the property surrounding their long-term home near Finn Rock on the McKenzie River in western Oregon was burned in the 2020 Holiday Farm Fire, the couple moved temporarily to Eugene, Oregon.[60][3]

Lopez died on December 25, 2020, from complications of prostate cancer, in Eugene, Oregon.[61][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Barry Lopez". National Book Foundation. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  2. ^ a b Evans, Alice (March 1994). "Leaning into the Light: An Interview with Barry Lopez". Poets & Writers. 22 (2): 62–79. ProQuest 1311697040.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l McFadden, Robert D. (December 27, 2020). "Barry Lopez, Lyrical Writer Who Was Likened to Thoreau, Dies at 75". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  4. ^ Tydeman, William (2013). Conversations with Barry Lopez. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 3. ISBN 9780806150482.
  5. ^ "Barry Lopez: An Inventory of His Papers (Part 1), 1964–2001 and undated, at the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library".
  6. ^ "Barry Lopez". Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  7. ^ Lopez, Barry. "Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75". NPR.org. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  8. ^ "Barry Lopez's Horizon is a masterpiece of a reminder to do better". vancouversun. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  9. ^ a b Newell, Mike (2008). No Bottom: In Conversation with Barry Lopez. XOXOX Press. p. 20. ISBN 978-1-880977-07-1. OCLC 181335874.
  10. ^ a b Who's Who in America, 2009. 1. Marquis Who's Who. 2008. p. 3026. OCLC 1036970200.
  11. ^ a b Macfarlane, Robert (April 2, 2005). "Robert Macfarlane on Barry Lopez". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  12. ^ Kakutani, Michiko (February 12, 1986). "Books of the Times". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c "Lopez, Barry". Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  14. ^ Slovic 1992, p. 142.
  15. ^ McClintock 1994, p. 141.
  16. ^ McClintock 1994, p. 143.
  17. ^ Slovic 1992, p. 143.
  18. ^ "Barry Lopez, award-winning Arctic Dreams author, has died aged 75". the Guardian. Associated Press. December 27, 2020. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  19. ^ "Horizon by Barry Lopez review – magnificent on the natural world, and furious too". the Guardian. March 14, 2019. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  20. ^ "Texas Tech University :: Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library". Swco.ttu.edu. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2012.
  21. ^ "Barry Lopez – News". www.barrylopez.com. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved July 7, 2008.
  22. ^ Ackerman, Mary Ellen (1977). "Desert Notes: Reflections in the Eye of a Raven by Barry Holstun Lopez". Western American Literature. 12 (2): 166–168. doi:10.1353/wal.1977.0058. ISSN 1948-7142. S2CID 165511052.
  23. ^ Hymes, Dell H. (1979). Western Humanities Review. 33 (1): 73. ProQuest 1291780352.CS1 maint: untitled periodical (link)
  24. ^ "Barry Lopez". Encyclopædia Britannica. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  25. ^ "Winter Count". Kirkus Reviews. April 1, 1981. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  26. ^ "Friends of American Writers Chicago Literature Awards". www.fawchicago.org. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  27. ^ "Crow and Weasel". Kirkus Reviews. October 5, 1990. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  28. ^ Pohrt, Tom. "Tom Pohrt Archive1980-2004 1990–2004". quod.lib.umich.edu. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  29. ^ "Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association 1995 Book Awards" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 6, 2014.
  30. ^ Levin, Martin (October 11, 1997). "Of men and wolverines". The Globe and Mail. p. D17. ProQuest 384795652.
  31. ^ "Light Action in the Caribbean". Kirkus Reviews. November 8, 2000. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  32. ^ "Resistance". Kirkus Reviews. June 13, 2004. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  33. ^ "Outside". Kirkus Reviews. March 8, 2014. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  34. ^ Macdonald, David W. (April 1980). Oryx. 15 (3): 296. doi:10.1017/S0030605300024765. ISSN 0030-6053.CS1 maint: untitled periodical (link)
  35. ^ "JBA Medal Award List". research.amnh.org. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  36. ^ Noble, Barnes &. "John Burroughs Medal, Science & Nature Awards, Books". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  37. ^ "Commencement Ceremony Features Author Barry Lopez". www.coa.edu. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  38. ^ Hoagland, Edward (February 16, 1986). "From the Land Where Polar Bears Fly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  39. ^ "National Book Critics Circle Award past winners and finalists". Archived from the original on October 18, 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  40. ^ Aton, Jim (1988). Western American Literature. 23 (3): 285–286. doi:10.1353/wal.1988.0115. ISSN 1948-7142. S2CID 165754150.CS1 maint: untitled periodical (link)
  41. ^ McIvor, D. E. (1993). Western American Literature. 27 (4): 379. doi:10.1353/wal.1993.0119. ISSN 1948-7142. S2CID 165261722.CS1 maint: untitled periodical (link)
  42. ^ Flower, Dean (1999). "Nature Does Not Exist for Us". The Hudson Review. 52 (2): 305–312. doi:10.2307/3853424. JSTOR 3853424.
  43. ^ Burnside, John. "The beauty of roadkill". New Statesman. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  44. ^ Horizon by Barry Lopez. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  45. ^ MacFarlane, Robert (March 14, 2019). "Horizon by Barry Lopez review – magnificent on the natural world, and furious too". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  46. ^ Klinkenborg, Verlyn (September 26, 2019). "The Voice of the Landscape". The New York Review of Books. ISSN 0028-7504. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  47. ^ Burnett, Elizabeth-Jane (March 20, 2020). "Horizon by Barry Lopez book review". The Times Literary Supplement. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  48. ^ Lopez, Barry Holstun, 1945- (2004). Vintage Lopez. Vintage Books. ISBN 1-4000-3398-5. OCLC 52410107. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  49. ^ Sullivan, Robert (December 3, 2006). "A Landscape of Words". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  50. ^ The future of nature : writing on a human ecology from Orion magazine. Lopez, Barry Holstun, 1945- (1st ed.). Minneapolis, Minn.: Milkweed Editions. 2007. ISBN 978-1-57131-306-5. OCLC 141187889. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.CS1 maint: others (link)
  51. ^ "Barry Lopez, award-winning Arctic Dreams author, has died aged 75". the Guardian. Associated Press. December 27, 2020. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  52. ^ a b "Barry Lopez". Guggenheim Foundation. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  53. ^ "Barry Lopez". Lannan Foundation. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  54. ^ Schaub, Michael (December 23, 2020). "Barry Lopez Wins 'Writer in the World' Prize". Kirkus Reviews. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  55. ^ McCurdy, Christen (December 26, 2020). "National Book Award-winning author Barry Lopez dead at 75". United Press International. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  56. ^ a b "Barry Lopez Awarded UT Austin's Dobie Paisano International Residency Prize". UT News. University of Texas at Austin. July 25, 2017. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  57. ^ Tydeman, William E. (August 26, 2013). Conversations with Barry Lopez: Walking the Path of Imagination. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-8061-5048-2.
  58. ^ Novak, Theresa. "Literary masters get set to shine". Corvallis Gazette-Times. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2020.
  59. ^ "Honorary Degrees". www.whittier.edu. Archived from the original on September 10, 2018. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  60. ^ Wadsworth, Lois (April 25, 2002). "Between Two Worlds". Eugene Weekly. Archived from the original on June 17, 2007. Retrieved May 6, 2007.
  61. ^ Blanchard, Dave (December 26, 2020). "Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75". NPR. Archived from the original on December 27, 2020. Retrieved December 26, 2020.

Sources[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]