Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theater

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The Barrymore Award

The Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre is an annual, nationally recognized award program by Theatre Philadelphia for professional theater productions in the Greater Philadelphia area. Each season culminates in the Fall with an awards ceremony and celebration. The Barrymore Awards honoring local artists and theatre companies while increasing public awareness of the richness and diversity of Philadelphia's thriving theatre community.[1]

Named in honor of the famed American theatrical family, the Barrymore family, the Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre have served as Philadelphia's professional theatre awards program since the 1994–1995 season.

The awards include an adjudication of 24 categories, including 5 cash awards totaling up to $118,000 for artists and organizations each year.[2] In June 2018, Theatre Philadelphia announced the removal of gender identifiers from performance categories.[3]

F. Otto Haas Award[edit]

This annual award acknowledges an emerging theater artist for artistic excellence and promise.[4] List of winners:

  • 1996 – Michael Hollinger
  • 1997 – Adam Wernick
  • 1998 – Robert Christophe
  • 1999 – Jennifer Childs
  • 2000 – John Lumia
  • 2001 – Catherine Slusar
  • 2002 – Scott Greer
  • 2003 – Ian Merrill Peakes
  • 2004 – Jorge Cousineau
  • 2005 – James Sugg
  • 2006 – Ben Dibble
  • 2007 – Matt Saunders
  • 2008 – Matt Pfeiffer
  • 2009 – Charlotte Cloe Fox Wind
  • 2010 – Sarah Sanford
  • 2011 – James Ijames
  • 2012 – Steve Pacek
  • 2013 – Charlotte Ford
  • 2014 – Liz Filios
  • 2015 – Akeem Davis
  • 2016 – Bi Jean Ngo
  • 2017 – Mary Tuomanen
  • 2018 – Taysha Canales
  • 2019 – Jaylene Clark Owens

See also[edit]

  • Cushman Award also presented during the Barrymore ceremony since 1995.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Barrymore Awards | Theatre Philadelphia". theatrephiladelphia.org. April 25, 2016. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  2. ^ Hilario, Kenneth (November 6, 2018). "Barrymore Awards winners announced, record $118K in grants given to artists". Philadelphia Business Journal. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  3. ^ Leigh Goldenberg. "No more Outstanding Actor: How the Barrymore Awards just became gender inclusive | Perspective". Philadelphia Daily News. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  4. ^ "F. Otto Haas Award | Theatre Philadelphia". theatrephiladelphia.org. April 25, 2016. Retrieved April 5, 2020.

External links[edit]