Bartizan

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Line drawing of a bartizan

A bartizan (an alteration of bratticing), also called a guerite, garita, or échauguette, or spelled bartisan, is an overhanging, wall-mounted turret projecting from the walls of late medieval and early-modern fortifications from the early 14th century up to the 18th century.[1] Most frequently found at corners, they protected a warder and enabled him to see his surroundings. Bartizans generally are furnished with oillets or arrow slits.[2] The turret was usually supported by stepped masonry corbels and could be round, polygonal or square.[3]

Bartizans were incorporated into many notable examples of Scottish Baronial architecture. In the architecture of Aberdeen, the new Town House, built in 1868–74, incorporates bartizans in the West Tower.

Gallery[edit]

At walls[edit]

At towers[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Bretèche
  • Garret—an attic or top floor room in the military sense; a watchtower from the French word garite

References[edit]

  1. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainWood, James, ed. (1907). "Bartizan". The Nuttall Encyclopædia. London and New York: Frederick Warne.
  2. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Bartizan". Encyclopædia Britannica. 3 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 450.
  3. ^ Bradley, Simon, ed. (2010). Pevsner's Architectural Glossary. Yale University Press. p. 33. ISBN 978-0-300-16721-4.