Bartkus v. Illinois

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Bartkus v. Illinois
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued November 19, 1957
Reargued October 21–22, 1958
Decided March 30, 1959
Full case name Bartkus v. Illinois
Citations 359 U.S. 121 (more)
79 S. Ct. 676; 3 L. Ed. 2d 684; 1959 U.S. LEXIS 1824
Holding
Coordination of federal officials with state officials did not implicate the Double Jeopardy Clause of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It also held that a defendant may be acquitted of a federal crime and convicted of a state crime, even if those crimes share the same evidence, without violating the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Frankfurter, joined by Clark, Harlan, Whittaker, Stewart
Dissent Black, joined by Warren, Douglas
Dissent Brennan, joined by Warren, Douglas

Bartkus v. Illinois, 359 U.S. 121 (1959), is a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court. The decision held that coordination of federal officials with state officials did not implicate the Double Jeopardy Clause of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It also held that a defendant may be acquitted of a federal crime and convicted of a state crime, even if those crimes share the same evidence, without violating the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

The case established the dual sovereign exception to the Double Jeopardy Clause, enabling state and federal prosecutions for substantially similar events.

External links[edit]

  • Text of Bartkus v. Illinois is available from:  Findlaw  Justia