Baruch Hagai

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Baruch Hagai, 2016
Olympic medal record
Representing  Israel
Summer Paralympic Games
Swimming
Gold medal – first place 1964 Tokyo 50m breaststroke
Bronze medal – third place 1964 Tokyo medley relay
Table tennis
Gold medal – first place 1964 Tokyo Singles
Bronze medal – third place 1964 Tokyo Doubles
Gold medal – first place 1968 Tel Aviv Singles
Gold medal – first place 1968 Tel Aviv Doubles
Gold medal – first place 1972 Heidelberg Singles
Gold medal – first place 1976 Toronto Singles
Wheelchair basketball
Gold medal – first place 1968 Tel Aviv
Gold medal – first place 1980 Arnheim
Stoke Mandeville Games
Wheelchair basketball
Gold medal – first place 1967 Basketball
Gold medal – first place 1969 Basketball
Gold medal – first place 1981 Basketball
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 1971 Basketball
Gold medal – first place 1975 Basketball
European Championships
Gold medal – first place 1971 Basketball
Gold medal – first place 1978 Basketball
Gold medal – first place 1981 Basketball
Baruch Hagai.jpg

Baruch Hagai (Hebrew: ברוך חגאי‎; born 1944) is an Israeli paralympic champion.

Early life[edit]

Hagai was born in Tripoli, Libya, to a Jewish family of 13. At the age of two he contracted polio, and five years later his family made aliyah to Israel. The family settled in Tel Aviv, where Hagai was treated for polio in Israel for the first time. Hagai was trained as a technician, and in the years 1960-2000 he worked as a technician and project manager for a bus-manufacturing factory.

Basketball and table tennis career[edit]

He was one of the first to join the Israel Sports Center for the Disabled, in 1960, and was active in wheelchair basketball and in table tennis. Over the years he took part in 224 international basketball games on behalf of the Israeli national team and 66 international games on behalf of the Center. In table tennis he won four consecutive gold medals at the Paralympic Games.

Following his retirement, Hagai joined the Sports Center as head coach.

Awards[edit]

In 1986, Hagai was declared as a "Man of Peace" on behalf of the International Olympic Committee.

In 2001, he was awarded with the Israel Prize, for sports,[1][2] in recognition of his long years of excellence in disabled sports.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]