Baruntse

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Baruntse
Baruntse wp.jpg
Baruntse from Hongu Valley
Highest point
Elevation7,162 m (23,497 ft) [1]
Prominence979 m (3,212 ft) [1]
Coordinates27°52′18″N 86°58′48″E / 27.87167°N 86.98000°E / 27.87167; 86.98000Coordinates: 27°52′18″N 86°58′48″E / 27.87167°N 86.98000°E / 27.87167; 86.98000
Geography
Baruntse is located in Nepal
Baruntse
Baruntse
Nepal
LocationKhumbu, Nepal
Parent rangeHimalayas
Climbing
First ascent1954 by New Zealand expedition
Easiest routeglacier/snow/ice climb

Baruntse is a mountain in the Khumbu region of eastern Nepal, crowned by four peaks and bounded on the south by the Hunku Glacier, on the east by the Barun Glacier, and on the northwest by the Imja Glacier. The mountain was first climbed May 30, 1954 via the south ridge by Colin Todd and Geoff Harrow of a New Zealand expedition led by Sir Edmund Hillary.[2] The first ascent of the East Ridge was made on April 27, 1980 by Lorenzo Ortas, Javier Escartín, Jeronimo Lopez (all Spain) and Carlos Buhler (America) of a Spanish expedition led by Juan José Díaz Ibañez.[3]

Accessing the mountain is usually gained from the South, where climbers can ascend Mera Peak to acclimatise before moving up the valley to Baruntse base camp.

Nineteen-times Everest summiteer Chhewang Nima died in 2010 on Baruntse.[4] after falling through a cornice while fixing a rope beneath the summit.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Baruntse, Nepal" Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2012-01-22.
  2. ^ Hillary, E.; Hardie, N.; Harrow, G.; Ball, M.; Todd, C. (1955). "The N.Z.A.C. Himalayan Expedition, 1954". New Zealand Alpine Journal: 5–53. Archived from the original on February 18, 2013. Retrieved November 25, 2012.
  3. ^ Díaz Ibañez, Juan José (1983). Expedición Aragonesa al Himalaya Baruntse (7220). Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain: Caja de Ahorros y Monte de Piedad de Zaragoza, Aragon y Rioja. ISBN 8450083397.
  4. ^ "Search for missing Nepal Sherpa Chhewang Nima stopped". BBC News. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  5. ^ "The Disposable Man: A Western History of Sherpas on Everest". Outside magazine. 6 March 2020.