Bashir ibn Sa'ad

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Bashir ibn Sa'ad was one of the companions of Muhammad. He was among the Banu Aws and later became chief of Banu Aws clan. He was the first one who pledged of allegiance to first caliph Abu Bakr in Saqifa meeting, he well-handled the situation when there was a huge dispute and division on the matter of succession to Prophet.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

He was among the early Muslims of Median from the clan of Banu Aws. When he reached in his mature age he became the chief of Banu Aus[3]

610 – 632: Muhammad's era[edit]

He was a Companion who was present at the battle of Badr.

He became the chief of Banu Aus[3]

Military campaigns during Muhammad's era[edit]

He participated in the Battle of Badr. Muhammad's forces included Abu Bakr, Umar, Ali, Hamza, Mus`ab ibn `Umair, Az-Zubair bin Al-'Awwam, Ammar ibn Yasir, and Abu Dharr al-Ghifari. The Muslims also brought seventy camels and two horses, meaning that they either had to walk or fit three to four men per camel.[4] However, many early Muslim sources indicate that no serious fighting was expected,[5] and the future Caliph Uthman stayed behind to care for his sick wife Ruqayyah, the daughter of Muhammad.[6] Salman the Persian also could not join the battle, as he was still not a free man.[7][8]

He also led a military campaign as a commander known as the Expedition of Bashir Ibn Sa’d al-Ansari (Fadak). He was sent to Fadak, the event took place in Shaban, 7AH i.e. December 628 AD,3rd Month 7AH, of the Islamic Calendar.[9][10]

Succession to Muhammad[edit]

Main article: saqifah

It is mentioned in Seerat Ibn e Ishaq (the very first biography of Muhammad)) and subsequently Seerat Ibn e Hatham (another authentic biography of Muhammad)) and all other history and biography books that when Muhammad died, companions of Prophet were busy in their final rituals then they were informed that there is a gathering of Ansar of Medina. They are discussing succession after Prophet, and Sa'd ibn Ubadah chief of Khazraj clan is a strong candidate for succession of Prophet.[11] Fearing of civil war Abu Bakr, Umar and Abu Ubaidah ibn al-Jarrah instantly reached there, the situation was quite tense. Ansars were almost agreed on the khilafat of Sa'd ibn Ubadah, Muhajirs mainly above three shaikhs disagreed then Habab ibn Mundhir who was motivating the Ansars to take control of the city, suggested to appoint to two Khalifas, one from Ansars and other for Muhajirs and if Muhajirs don't agree on that term then "take your swords and throw them out of Medina".[12] Then Bashir ibn Sa'ad who belonged to clan of Banu Aws, intervened and handled the flared up situation. He said, "O Ansar you're the first who helped Prophet when His own people rejected him, now you should not be the first to destroy unity of Muslims after Him. And whatever you'he done for Islam you should seek its reward in afterlife and should not be divided on the issue of succession."[13][14] After that Abu Bakr asked people to appoint as Khalifa either to Umar or Abu Ubaidah ibn al-Jarrah because both of them were Muhajirs from Quraysh, were among the very first who accepted Islam and were among the closest companions of Prophet. But Umar withdrew himself saying that he would never consider himself when Abu Bakr is present. Then Bashir ibn Sa'ad was the first one who pledged at the hand of Abu Bakr, then Umar and Abu Ubaidah ibn al-Jarrah and after that all people at Saqifah followed them.[15][16][17]

Death[edit]

He was martyred at 'Ayn at-Tamr, as az-Zurqani mentioned.

Legacy[edit]

Shi'a view[edit]

Ali Asgher Razwy, a 20th century Shi'a Twelver Islamic scholar states:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ibn Hatham, Abdul Malik (2000). Seerat Ibn Hatham (1st ed.). Cairo, Egypt: Al-Falah Foundation. p. 291. ISBN 977-5813-80-8. 
  2. ^ Ibn Khaldun, Abdur Rehman (2003). Tareekh Ibn Khaldun Volume II (First ed.). Karachi, Pakistan: Nafees Academy. p. 177-180. 
  3. ^ a b Imamate: The Vicegerency of the Prophet Al-islam.org [1]
  4. ^ Lings, pp. 138–139
  5. ^ "Sahih al-Bukhari: Volume 5, Book 59, Number 287". Usc.edu. Archived from the original on 16 August 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  6. ^ "Sahih al-Bukhari: Volume 4, Book 53, Number 359". Usc.edu. Archived from the original on 20 July 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  7. ^ "Witness-pioneer.org". Witness-pioneer.org. 16 September 2002. Archived from the original on 5 February 2010. Retrieved 19 March 2010. 
  8. ^ "Sahih al-Bukhari: Volume 5, Book 59, Number 286". Usc.edu. Archived from the original on 16 August 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  9. ^ Shawqī Abū Khalīl, Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks P. 205]
  10. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  11. ^ Ibn Hatham, Abdul Malik (2000). Seerat Ibn Hatham (1st ed.). Cairo, Egypt: Al-Falah Foundation. p. 288. ISBN 977-5813-80-8. 
  12. ^ Ibn Khaldun, Abdur Rehman (2003). Tareekh Ibn Khaldun Volume II (First ed.). Karachi, Pakistan: Nafees Academy. p. 176. 
  13. ^ Ibn Khaldun, Abdur Rehman (2003). Tareekh Ibn Khaldun Volume II (First ed.). Karachi, Pakistan: Nafees Academy. p. 177. 
  14. ^ Ibn Hatham, Abdul Malik (2000). Seerat Ibn Hatham (1st ed.). Cairo, Egypt: Al-Falah Foundation. p. 290. ISBN 977-5813-80-8. 
  15. ^ Ibn Khaldun, Abdur Rehman (2003). Tareekh Ibn Khaldun Volume II (First ed.). Karachi, Pakistan: Nafees Academy. p. 178. 
  16. ^ Ibn Kathir Damishque, Amad ud Din (2003). Tareekh ibn Kathir Volume VI (Offict ed.). Urdu Bazar, Karachi Pakistan: Nafees Academy. p. 401. 
  17. ^ Ibn Hatham, Abdul Malik (2000). Seerat Ibn Hatham (1st ed.). Cairo, Egypt: Al-Falah Foundation. p. 291. ISBN 977-5813-80-8. 
  18. ^ A Restatement of the History of Islam and Muslims on Al-Islam.org [2]

External links[edit]