Bass Harbor Head Light

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Bass Harbor Head Light
Bass harbor head light 20041002 123635 1.1504x1000.jpg
Bass Harbor Head Light is located in Maine
Bass Harbor Head Light
Location Tremont, Maine
Coordinates 44°13′18.5″N 68°20′14.2″W / 44.221806°N 68.337278°W / 44.221806; -68.337278Coordinates: 44°13′18.5″N 68°20′14.2″W / 44.221806°N 68.337278°W / 44.221806; -68.337278
Year first constructed 1858
Year first lit 1858
Automated 1974
Foundation Stone
Construction Brick
Tower shape Cylindrical tower
Markings / pattern White with black marking
Original lens Fourth Order Fresnel lens
Current lens Fourth Order Fresnel lens
Range 13 nautical miles (24 km; 15 mi)
Characteristic Occulting red, 4s
Fog signal none
USCG number

1-2335 [1] [2] [3] [4]

Bass Harbor Head Light Station
Nearest city Bass Harbor, Maine
Area 2.5 acres (1.0 ha)
Architect US Army Corps of Engineers
MPS Light Stations of Maine MPS
NRHP Reference #

87002273

[5]
Added to NRHP January 21, 1988

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse is a lighthouse located within Acadia National Park in the southwest portion of Mount Desert Island, Maine, marking the entrance to Bass Harbor and Blue Hill Bay.

History[edit]

The history of Bass Harbor Head Light dates to 1855, when it was determined that there was sufficient reason for a lighthouse at the mouth of Bass Harbor. In 1885, the U.S. Congress appropriated $5,000 for construction of the lighthouse. In 1876, construction was completed on a fog bell and tower, since removed.[1] A much larger 4,000-pound (1800 kg) bell was placed inside the tower in 1898.[6] The house of the lightkeeper remains in its original configuration with the exception of a 10-foot addition that was added in 1900.[6] The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Bass Harbor Head Light Station on January 21, 1988, reference number 87002273.[5]

In 1902, an oil storage house constructed of brick was built 205 feet northwest of the lighthouse.[1]

Bass Harbor's fifth order Fresnel lens was replaced in 1902 with a larger fourth order. This lens was manufactured by the French company Henry-Lepaute. This lens remains in service today.[7]

Viewing[edit]

Today, the house is a private residence for a local Coast Guard member and his family. Tourists can get close to the bell and light via a concrete path, but most of the grounds remain private. There is a short walk which takes one to a series of wooden steps that lead down onto the many granite boulders that provide a great view of the harbor side of the lighthouse.[1]

Keepers[edit]

  • John Thurston (1858–1861)
  • John Rick (1861–1865)
  • John Wilson (1865–1869)
  • Charles B. Gilley (1869–1872)
  • James L. Wilson (1872–1880)
  • C. F. Chase (1880–1890)
  • William T. Holbrook (1890–1894)
  • Willis Dolliver (1894–1912)
  • Joseph M. Gray (c.1921-1938)
  • Elmer Reed (1938–1940)
  • Eugene L. Coleman (?)
  • Leverett Stanley (1940–1950)[1]

Gallery[edit]

Entrance to the compound 
Tourists by waters near the lighthouse 
The lighthouse in 2008 
The lighthouse in 2005 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e New England Lighthouses, A Virtual Guide: Bass Harbor Head Light
  2. ^ Inventory of Historic Lighthouses: Maine Lighthouses
  3. ^ Light List, Volume I, Atlantic Coast, St. Croix River, Maine to Shrewsbury River, New Jersey (PDF). Light List. United States Coast Guard. 2009. p. 23. 
  4. ^ "Historic Light Station Information and Photography: Maine". United States Coast Guard Historian's Office. 
  5. ^ a b Staff (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  6. ^ a b Silverman, Irving (1998). The Historic Homes of the Town of Tremont... A Perspective In Time. Tremont, Maine: Tremont Historical Society. p. 7. 
  7. ^ "Classical Lenses in Operation" (PDF). US Coast Guard. 2009-08-06. 

External links[edit]