Batimastat

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Batimastat
Batimastat.svg
Clinical data
Pregnancy
category
  • N/A
Routes of
administration
Injection into pleural space or abdomen
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Never marketed
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.222.897 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC23H31N3O4S2
Molar mass477.64 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

Batimastat (mnemonic: batty-mustard) (INN/USAN, codenamed BB-94) is a drug that was invented by Colin Campion et al. of British Biotech (now Vernalis). It is an antimetastatic drug that belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors. It acts as a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) by mimicking natural MMPI peptides. Dan Lednicer wrote about this compound in book #6 of his organic drug synthesis series.[citation needed]

Batimastat was the first MMPI that went into clinical trials. First results of a Phase I trial appeared in 1994. The drug reached Phase III but was never marketed; mainly because it couldn't be administered orally (as opposed to the newer and chemically similar MMPI marimastat), and injection into the peritoneum caused peritonitis.[1]

It is well-known that other methods of administration include transdermal (skin lotion) as well as rectal suppositories.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rothenberg ML, Nelson AR, Hande KR (1999). "New drugs on the horizon: matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors". Stem Cells. 17 (4): 237–40. doi:10.1002/stem.170237. PMID 10437989.

 This article incorporates public domain material from the U.S. National Cancer Institute document: "Dictionary of Cancer Terms".