Batman Begins (soundtrack): Difference between revisions

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# "[[Lasiurus]]" &ndash; Includes Ra's Al Ghul teaching Bruce about criminals, Batman watching over Gotham after defeating Falcone and its Ra's Al Ghul's theme.<ref name=firstlisten/>
 
# "[[Lasiurus]]" &ndash; Includes Ra's Al Ghul teaching Bruce about criminals, Batman watching over Gotham after defeating Falcone and its Ra's Al Ghul's theme.<ref name=firstlisten/>
   
The first letters of tracks #4-9 spell BATMAN.
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The first letters of tracks #4-9 spell BATMAN. It's like the [[DaVinci code]], yo.
   
 
'''Tracks not included within the release of the soundtrack:'''<ref>''Batman Begins'' End Credits</ref>
 
'''Tracks not included within the release of the soundtrack:'''<ref>''Batman Begins'' End Credits</ref>

Revision as of 14:52, 7 June 2010

Batman Begins
Batmanbeginssoundtrack.jpg
Film score by Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Released June 14, 2005
Recorded December 26, 2004 - March 1, 2005
Length 60:26
Producer Warner Bros.
Batman soundtrack chronology
Batman Begins
(2005)
The Dark Knight
(2008)The Dark KnightString Module Error: Match not found

Batman Begins is a soundtrack album to Christopher Nolan's 2005 Batman Begins. It was released on June 15, 2005. The soundtrack drew from the film score, composed by Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard, as well as contributions by Ramin Djawadi and Mel Wesson. The songs in the soundtrack were titled with Latin names: the first song, "Vespertilio", is taken from the Latin word for bat, and the rest of the songs are titled after different genera of bats.[5] Director Christopher Nolan originally invited Zimmer to compose the film score, and Zimmer asked the director if he could invite Howard to compose as well, as they had always planned a composers collaboration.[6] The two composers collaborated on separate themes for the "split personality" of Bruce Wayne and his alter ego, Batman. Zimmer and Howard began composing in Los Angeles and moved to London where they stayed for 12 weeks to complete most of their writing.[7] Zimmer and Howard sought inspiration for shaping the score by making set visits to Batman Begins.[8]

Composition

Zimmer wanted to avoid composing a film score that had been done before, so the score became an amalgamation of orchestra and electronic music. The film's ninety-piece orchestra[6] was developed from members of various London orchestras, and Zimmer chose to use more than the normal amount of cellos. Zimmer enlisted a choir boy to help reflect the music in the film's scene where Bruce Wayne's parents are killed. "He's singing a fairly pretty tune and then he gets stuck, it's like froze, arrested development", Zimmer said. Zimmer also attempted to add human dimension to Batman, whose behavior would typically be seen as "psychotic", through the music. Both composers collaborated to create 2 hours and 20 minutes worth of music for the film.[8] Zimmer composed the action sequences, while Howard focused on the film's drama.[6]

Critical reception

Reviews of the score were mixed. Soundtrack.net, for example, in a review by Matt Scheller, said that "the music compliments the visuals flawlessly." He called the main action track, Molossus, the best of the soundtrack: "Once this track starts, it never quits." He does admit that the album is heavy on Hans Zimmer's style rather than James Newton Howard's ("I would say 70% Zimmer, 30% Howard"), and that "Hans Zimmer/Media Ventures haters should probably skip this album. His score in the end is four stars out of five."[4]

Movie Music UK was equally positive - Jonathan Broxton claimed that "I personally found that there was a great deal of music in Batman Begins that is hugely enjoyable", specifically complimenting "Howard's exceptionally beautiful string elegy...during the opening moments of Eptesicus", a motif that recurs in "the achingly emotional Macrotus and Coryhorinus". He did admit that a lack of strong superhero themes and a complete lack of similarities to Danny Elfman's Batman scores, now considered classics, did make the score "unremittingly downbeat". He also rates the album four out of five.[9]

Christian Clemmenson, sole reviewer of Filmtracks.com, was less ready to praise the score, saying that Zimmer and Howard's decision to not use Elfman's material an attitude that "stinks of laziness". He also considers the theme used to represent Batman, a rising, two-note minor third, inadequate to represent the complex character of Bruce Wayne and his alter ego. Most of these complaints he lays on the shoulders of Zimmer, saying that "you could argue that Zimmer traded in his hoard of lesser-known ghostwriters for one top-notch ghostwriter [Howard]." His final rating is two stars out of five.[10]

Use in other works

The soundtrack is also often sampled for other superhero related productions. "Vespertilio" and "Eptesicus" were used in the screener pilot for Heroes. "Myotis" has been featured in trailers for King Kong, Fantastic Four and Far Cry. "Molossus" was sampled for the Aquaman pilot, and was also used in the trailer for V for Vendetta and The Dark Knight. The beginning of "Vespertilio" and part of "Myotis" was also used for the previously mentioned V for Vendetta trailer.

Track listing

  1. "Vespertilio" – The opening. The flashback of the bats. The main theme. The journey to Ra's Al Ghul's monastery.[11]
  2. "Eptesicus" – The flashback of Bruce remembering his parents. The Training Sequence.[11]
  3. "Myotis" – Bruce destroys the monastery. Bruce knows what he must do when he returns to Gotham.[11]
  4. "Barbastella" – The death of the Waynes. Bruce sees the Bat and enters the cave as an adult, knowing his path.[11]
  5. "Artibeus" – Batman first appears. When Henri Duncard meets Bruce in the prison.[11]
  6. "Tadarida" – Batman has Rachel in the Batcave. Scarecrow attacks Batman.[11]
  7. "Macrotus" – The Wayne theme, flashback of Bruce going to the opera. Bruce in the Ninja test. Flashback of Bruce meeting Rachel again and the courtroom with Joe Chill.[11]
  8. "Antrozous" – Batman reveals himself to Dawes, flies to Ducard. Fights League of Shadows ninjas.[11]
  9. "Nycteris" – Bruce meets Lucius Fox. Bruce sets his gadgets. Bruce has a moment with Rachel before she goes to Arkham.[11]
  10. "Molossus" – The main Action theme. Tumbler escape chase to the Batcave.[11]
  11. "Corynorhinus" – The film's resolution. Bruce and Rachel meeting in the ruins of Wayne Manor. Gordon unveils the Bat Signal to Batman.[11]
  12. "Lasiurus" – Includes Ra's Al Ghul teaching Bruce about criminals, Batman watching over Gotham after defeating Falcone and its Ra's Al Ghul's theme.[11]

The first letters of tracks #4-9 spell BATMAN. It's like the DaVinci code, yo.

Tracks not included within the release of the soundtrack:[12]

Written by Arrigo Boito. Performed by Norman Treigle. Ambrosian Opera Chorus & London Symphony Orchestra. Conducted by Julius Rudel. EMI Classics. EMI Film & Television Music

Written by Mildred J. Hill & Patty S. Hill. Performed by Cavendish String Quartet

  • "Divertimento In D"

Written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Performed by Cavendish String Quartet

Chart positions

Chart (2005) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard 200[13] 155
Top Soundtracks[13] 8

References

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Filmtracks review
  3. ^ Movie Music UK
  4. ^ a b SoundtrackNet review
  5. ^ "Batman Begins Soundtrack". SoundtrackNet. Retrieved 2006-11-06. 
  6. ^ a b c Danny Graydon (July 2005). "A Little Knight Music". Empire. p. 87. 
  7. ^ Spence D (2005-06-10). "Batman Vs. Hans Zimmer & James Newton Howard Part 1". IGN. Retrieved 2006-12-01. 
  8. ^ a b Spence D (2005-06-13). "Batman Vs. Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard Part 2". IGN. Retrieved 2006-12-01. 
  9. ^ Jonathan Broxton – "Movie Music UK - Batman Begins - Hans Zimmer/James Newton Howard"
  10. ^ Christian Clemmenson – "Filmtracks: Batman Begins (Hans Zimmer/James Newton Howard"
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Matt Scheller (2005-06-06). "Batman Begins: First Listen". SoundtrackNet. Retrieved 2008-09-19. 
  12. ^ Batman Begins End Credits
  13. ^ a b "Billboard Albums: Batman Begins". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-05-23.