Battersea (UK Parliament constituency)

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Battersea
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Battersea in Greater London.
County Greater London
Population 106,709 (2011 census)[1]
Electorate 73,028 (December 2010)[2]
Current constituency
Created 1983
Member of parliament Marsha de Cordova (Labour)
Number of members One
Created from Battersea North and Battersea South
18851918
Number of members One
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced by Battersea North and Battersea South
Created from Mid Surrey
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency London

Battersea is a constituency[n 1] in the London Borough of Wandsworth[n 2] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Marsha De Cordova of the Labour Party.[n 3]

The seat has had two periods of existence (1885-1918 and 1983 to date). In the first Parliament after the seat's re-creation it was Labour-represented, bucking the national result, thereafter from 1987 until 2017 the affiliation of the winning candidate was that of the winning party nationally – a 30-year bellwether. Battersea is 1 of 49 won (held or gained) by a Labour candidate in 2017 from a total of 73 covering London. De Cordova's 2017 win was one of 30 net gains of the Labour Party.

Boundaries[edit]

1885-1918: Wards 2 and 3 of Battersea Parish, and that part of No. 4 Ward bounded on the south by Battersea Rise, and on the east by St John's Road.

1983-2010: The London Borough of Wandsworth wards of Balham, Fairfield, Latchmere, Northcote, Queenstown, St John, St Mary's Park, and Shaftesbury.

2010–present: As above, with the exclusion of St John.

Covers the north-eastern third of the London Borough of Wandsworth, Battersea as drawn and redrawn since 1983 includes central Wandsworth and in the same way as Chelsea on the opposite bank, adjoins the Thames before flowing through central London.

It takes in all of the district of Battersea including its large Battersea Park which hosts frequent live entertainment events and seasonal festivals, riverside and London Heliport and stretches eastwards to include Nine Elms and surrounding the Park: Queenstown; generally widely known large neighbourhoods of Battersea Town;[n 4] and westwards to include most of Wandsworth town, including the riverside, Town Hall and East Hill.[n 5] Battersea also stretches south between Wandsworth Common and Clapham Common to include Balham Ward, the eastern end of Balham (the west for General Elections being placed since 1983 in Tooting).

Constituency profile[edit]

A largely residential and ethnically diverse inner-city district of south London, the seat of Battersea includes half of Clapham Common, along with parts of Balham and Wandsworth. The iconic Battersea Power Station along with Nine Elms and the Patmore Estate. Battersea Power Station dominates the skyline, while Clapham Junction continues to be the busiest railway interchange in the UK.

Thanks to the influx of commuters, the constituency's social and demographic profile has changed considerably over the last quarter of a century. At 57.4%, it has the highest proportion of people with a degree-level qualification or above amongst constituencies in England and Wales, according to Office for National Statistics 2011 Census figures. More than one in five has an associate professional and technical occupation.

A former bellwether seat, Battersea's winner came from the winning party from the 1987 to the 2015 General Elections inclusive.

History[edit]

Battersea in the Metropolitan Board of Works area, showing "Borough of Battersea" boundaries used from 1885 to 1918 of Battersea itself

The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 provided that the Constituency was to consist of-

  • "No. 2 Ward of Battersea Parish,
  • No. 3 Ward of Battersea Parish, and
  • So much of No. 4 Ward of Battersea Parish as lies to the north of a line drawn along the centre of Battersea Rise, and to the west of a line drawn along the centre of the St. John's Road."[3]

Battersea constituency was originally created in 1885. From 1892 to 1918 the seat was held by trade union leader John Burns who served as a Minister (of the Crown) in the Liberal Cabinets of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith from 1905 until 1914.

The constituency was split in 1918 into:

  • Battersea North, which included the cheap housing accompanying Battersea Power Station and railway-works focussed Nine Elms[4] seeing gradually replacement in its lifespan to overcrowded terraces — it had only four years of a Conservative MP (from 1931)
  • Battersea South had middle average income and few pockets of slum clearance. It saw 38 years of a Conservative MP; lastly 1959-1964; not doing so during new Conservative governments later in 1970 and 1979.

The two constituencies were rejoined in 1983, although some areas of Battersea South became part of the adjoining Tooting constituency. Alf Dubs (L) before the election incumbent for Battersea South, won the constituency in 1983. Conservative John Bowis won in the next elections, 1987 and 1992. Martin Linton, a Labour politician, took it back in 1997 and held the seat until 2010.

Trivia[edit]

In 2001, the candidate T.E Barber used the candidate description "No fruit out of context party", and advocated the end of, amongst other crimes against food, pineapples on pizza (David Boothroyd)

In the book "Things Can Only Get Better: Eighteen Miserable Years in the Life of a Labour Supporter," John O'Farrell describes his experiences of being the secretary of Queenstown Branch of the Battersea Labour party, during which time Labour lost every election in which they participated, and in 1987 their MP, Alf Dubs.

Benefiting from an exclusivity arrangement, the old Battersea North seat was one of two seats in London to have had a Communist MP: Shapurji Saklatvala represented the area from 1922 to 1929. A wealthy aristocratic Indian, he was among the five Communists elected to the national chamber in its history and was the third of the young Socialist Labour/Communist/Labour parties from an ethnic minority background. At first, Saklatvala had local Labour party support and was also a member of that party but then stood as a Communist in 1924 with local Labour party backing. The head office of the less radical Labour party mandated an official Labour candidate stand against him in 1929. The Battersea Labour Club (a drinking club not directly connected with the political party) had a notice on its notice board up until the 1980s banning Communists from admission to the club.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[5] Party
1885 Octavius Vaughan Morgan Liberal
1892 John Burns Liberal-Labour
see Battersea North and Battersea South for 1918-1983
1983 Alf Dubs Labour
1987 John Bowis Conservative
1997 Martin Linton Labour
2010 Jane Ellison Conservative
2017 Marsha De Cordova Labour

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2017: Battersea[6][7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Marsha de Cordova 25,292 45.9 +9.1
Conservative Jane Ellison 22,876 41.5 -10.8
Liberal Democrat Richard Davis 4,401 8.0 +3.6
Independent Chris Coghlan 1,234 2.2 N/A
Green Lois Davis 866 1.6 -1.7
UKIP Eugene Power 357 0.6 -2.5
Socialist (GB) Daniel Lambert 32 0.1 N/A
Majority 2,416 4.4 N/A
Turnout 55,058 71.0 +4.0
Registered electors 77,574
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +10.0
General Election 2015: Battersea[8][9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Jane Ellison 26,730 52.4 +5.0
Labour Will Martindale 18,792 36.8 +1.7
Liberal Democrat Luke Taylor 2,241 4.4 -10.3
Green Joe Stuart 1,682 3.3 +2.2
UKIP Christopher Howe 1,586 3.1 +2.1
Majority 7,938 15.6 +3.4
Turnout 51,031 67.0 +1.3
Registered electors 76,111
Conservative hold Swing +1.6
General Election 2010: Battersea[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Jane Ellison 23,103 47.3 +7.3
Labour Martin Linton 17,126 35.1 -4.1
Liberal Democrat Layla Moran 7,176 14.7 -0.1
Green Guy Evans 559 1.1 -3.1
UKIP Christopher MacDonald 505 1.0 +0.2
Hugh Salmon for Battersea Party Hugh Salmon 168 0.3 N/A
Independent Tom Fox 155 0.3 N/A
Majority 5,977 12.2 N/A
Turnout 48,792 65.7 +6.5
Registered electors 74,311
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +6.5

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Battersea[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Martin Linton 16,569 40.4 -9.9
Conservative Dominic Schofield 16,406 40.0 +3.5
Liberal Democrat Norsheen Bhatti 6,006 14.6 +2.5
Green Hugo Charlton 1,735 4.2 +4.2
UKIP Terry Jones 333 0.8 N/A
Majority 163 0.4 -13.3
Turnout 41,049 59.0 +4.5
Registered electors 69,548
Labour hold Swing -6.7
General Election 2001: Battersea[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Martin Linton 18,498 50.3 -0.5
Conservative Lucy Shersby 13,445 36.5 -2.9
Liberal Democrat Siobhan Vitelli 4,450 12.1 +4.7
Independent Thomas Barber 411 1.1 N/A
Majority 5,053 13.7 +2.4
Turnout 36,804 54.5 -16.3
Registered electors 67,495
Labour hold Swing +2.1

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Battersea[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Martin Linton 24,047 50.7 +9.5
Conservative John Bowis 18,687 39.4 -11.1
Liberal Democrat Paula Keaveney 3,482 7.4 +0.3
Referendum Mark Slater 804 1.7 N/A
UKIP Ashley Banks 250 0.5 N/A
Rainbow Dream Ticket Joseph Marshall 127 0.3 N/A
Majority 5,360 11.3 N/A
Turnout 47,397 70.8 -6.1
Registered electors 66,895
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +10.2
General Election 1992: Battersea[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Bowis 26,390 50.5 +6.2
Labour Alf Dubs 21,550 41.2 -1.2
Liberal Democrat Roger O'Brien 3,659 7.0 -4.9
Green Ian Wingrove 584 1.1 -0.1
Natural Law William Stevens 98 0.2 N/A
Majority 4,840 9.3 +7.5
Turnout 52,281 76.6 -5.3
Registered electors 68,218
Conservative hold Swing +3.7

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Battersea[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Bowis 20,945 44.2 +7.8
Labour Alf Dubs 20,088 42.4 -1.5
Social Democratic David Harries 5,634 11.9 -5.6
Green Sonia Willington 559 1.2 +0.3
Workers Revolutionary Anthony Bell 116 0.3 N/A
Majority 857 1.8 -5.7
Turnout 47,342 70.7 +4.3
Registered electors 66,979
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +4.6
General Election 1983: Battersea[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Alf Dubs 19,248 43.8 -6.4
Conservative Rupert Allason 15,972 36.4 -2.4
Social Democratic M. Harris 7,675 17.5 N/A
National Front Michael Salt 539 1.2 -1.0
Ecology Sonia Willington 377 0.9 N/A
Campaign for Black & White Unity T. Jackson 86 0.2 N/A
Community K. Purie-Harwell 22 0.1 +0.0
Majority 3,276 7.5 -4.0
Turnout 43,919 66.6 -3.1
Registered electors 65,938
Labour win (new seat)

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

1979 notional Battersea result (new seat created post-election)[edit]

General Election 1979: Battersea
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour 14,909 50.2 N/A
Conservative 11,505 38.8 N/A
Liberal 2,412 8.1 N/A
National Front 667 2.2 N/A
Workers Party 104 0.4 N/A
Workers Revolutionary 47 0.2 N/A
Community Party 30 0.1 N/A
Majority 3,404 11.5 N/A
Turnout 29,674 69.7 N/A
Registered electors
Labour hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General Election December 1910: Battersea and Clapham, Battersea
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Lib-Lab John Burns 7,836 52.8 +1.1
Conservative John Lane Harrington 6,544 44.0 -4.3
Independent Labour Charles Nathaniel Lowe Shaw 477 3.2 N/A
Majority 1,292 8.8 +5.4
Turnout 18,927 78.5 -8.8
Registered electors 18,927
Lib-Lab hold Swing +2.6
General Election January 1910: Battersea and Clapham, Battersea
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Lib-Lab John Burns 8540 51.7 -4.4
Conservative Arthur Benn 7985 48.3 +4.4
Majority 555 3.4 -8.8
Turnout 18,927 87.3 +1.6
Registered electors 18,927
Lib-Lab hold Swing -4.4

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

General Election 1906: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Lib-Lab John Burns 7,387 56.1 +5.0
Conservative Arthur Benn 5,787 43.9 −5.0
Majority 1,600 12.2 +10.0
Turnout 13,174 85.7 +6.2
Registered electors 15,369
Lib-Lab hold Swing +5.0
General Election 1900: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Lib-Lab John Burns 5,860 51.1 -0.1
Conservative Richard Charles Garton 5,606 48.9 +0.1
Majority 254 2.2 -0.2
Turnout 11,466 79.5 +3.6
Registered electors 14,420
Lib-Lab hold Swing -0.1

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

John Burns
General Election 1895: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Lib-Lab John Burns 5,010 51.2 -6.9
Conservative Charles Ridley Smith 4,766 48.8 +6.9
Majority 244 2.4 N/A
Turnout 9,776 75.9 -2.2
Registered electors 12,880
Lib-Lab gain from Independent Labour Swing -6.9
General Election 1892: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Labour John Burns 5,616 58.1 N/A
Conservative Walter Moresby Chinnery 4,057 41.9 -6.8
Majority 1,559 16.2 N/A
Turnout 9,673 78.1 +6.4
Registered electors 12,381
Independent Labour gain from Liberal Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General Election 1886: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Octavius Morgan 3,683 51.3 -3.3
Conservative Edward Cooper Willis 3,497 48.7 +3.3
Majority 186 2.6 -6.6
Turnout 7,180 71.7 -6.2
Registered electors 10,019
Liberal hold Swing -3.3
Battersea by-election, 1886
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Registered electors 10,019
Liberal hold

Morgan sought re-election after questions arose about a government contract his firm held.

General Election 1885: Battersea[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Octavius Morgan 4,259 54.6 N/A
Conservative John Edward Cooke 3,547 45.4 N/A
Majority 712 9.2 N/A
Turnout 7,806 77.9 N/A
Registered electors 10,019
Liberal win (new seat)

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ The London Borough of Wandsworth has had a Conservative Party majority of councillors in control since 1978.
  3. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  4. ^ Queenstown Road Battersea is passed through by the South Western Main Line. Nine Elms constitutes a large 2010s mixed use neighbourhood including the landmark converted Battersea Power Station by the River Thames. The United States Embassy is part of the redevelopment.
  5. ^ Specifically: "Fairfield" ward, Wandsworth
References
  1. ^ "Battersea: Usual Resident Population, 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  3. ^ Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, Sixth Schedule
  4. ^ Booth Poverty Map For prostitution and other "Lowest class: Vicious and semi-criminal" classification see Cumberland Street written notes: [1] and a small cluster of mean streets by the railways in Nine Elms
  5. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "B" (part 1)
  6. ^ "Battersea parliamentary constituency". BBC News. 
  7. ^ House Of Commons Library 2017 Election report http://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-7979/CBP-7979.pdf] House Of Commons Library 2017 Election report Check |url= value (help).  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  9. ^ Council, Wandsworth. "Battersea Constituency - Parliamentary election results May 2015 - Wandsworth Council". www.wandsworth.gov.uk. 
  10. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  12. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  13. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  14. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  15. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  16. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 9781349022984. 

External links[edit]