Battle Scars (comic book)

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Battle Scars
Cover to issue five.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
ScheduleMonthly
FormatLimited series
Publication date2011
No. of issues6
Main character(s)Nick Fury Jr
Nick Fury
Creative team
Written byCullen Bunn
Matt Fraction
Christopher Yost
Artist(s)Scot Eaton
Andrew 'Drew' Hennessy
Penciller(s)Scot Eaton
Inker(s)Andrew 'Drew' Hennessy
Letterer(s)Joe Sabino
Colorist(s)Antonio Fabela
Matthew 'Matt' Hollingsworth
Paul Mounts
Editor(s)Axel Alonso
Alejandro Arbona
Tom Brevoort
John Denning
Jennifer Grünwald
Joe Quesada

Battle Scars is a six issue comic book miniseries published by Marvel Comics in 2011 and 2012. The series was created to introduce Nick Fury Jr, the black son of the original Nick Fury to correspond with the version played in the films by Samuel L. Jackson;[1][2] The series introduced the character of Phil Coulson from the Marvel Cinematic Universe into the comics.[3]

Publication history[edit]

The series was published from 2011 to 2012.

Plot[edit]

While serving in the Middle East, Marcus Johnson receives word that his mother Nia Jones has been killed back in the United States. He returns home and is attacked by the Russian hitmen who killed her, and by Taskmaster, but is saved by Captain America. S.H.I.E.L.D. agents arrive and take him to a S.H.I.E.L.D. facility for medical treatment. After failing to get answers as to why he was targeted and his mother killed, Johnson comes to feel he is being held there against his will and escapes.[4]

While searching for Taskmaster, Johnson is attacked by Deadpool, who is also after Johnson. As they fight, Taskmaster arrives and dispatches Deadpool, but Johnson himself defeats Taskmaster. Johnson is felled, however, by the Serpent Squad. When Deadpool again intervenes, Johnson escapes with Taskmaster as his prisoner, and later interrogates him. Before he can obtain any information, a masked man stuns Taskmaster, drains Johnson's energy for a moment, and escapes. Johnson catches up with the man, who is revealed to be Johnson's father, Nick Fury.[5]

While arguing and eventually coming to blows over the revelation, Fury and Johnson are captured by mercenaries who bring them to Orion (who was a former member of the organization Leviathan). Orion has Johnson's left eye cut out and confirms that Johnson has the Infinity Formula in his DNA. Fury escapes his restraints and gives Johnson enough time to escape, but Fury is captured and his blood transfused to Orion, so that Orion's youth can be restored. The transfusion drains Fury of the remaining Infinity Formula in his system, and he is then tortured and mind-probed by Orion's telepath, who acquires all of Fury's S.H.I.E.L.D. secrets and fail-safes.[6] Johnson saves Fury with the help of S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson and later kills Orion. After convalescing, Johnson is given the Super Soldier uniform that Steve Rogers once wore. As a new agent of S.H.I.E.L.D., Johnson is also informed that his birth name is "Nicholas Fury Jr.".[7]

Reception[edit]

The series holds an average rating of 7.0 by 25 professional critics on the review aggregation website Comic Book Roundup.[8]

Joey Esposito of IGN stated that while he enjoyed the series as a whole, he still added that "its bizarre and frankly lengthy approach to establish parallels with the Marvel movie universe is painfully uninspired and disappointing. While there are nuggets of potential laced in this series' outcome, I'm not sure I have faith in the current state of superhero comics to deliver on it." He also gave credit to the artwork.[9]

Jamil Scalese of Comics Bulletin stated that many fans of Marvel Comics expressed a generally negative reaction to the series. but explained that while the purpose of it is painfully apparent, the story underneath is not so bad that it does not deserve recognition and that the writers Yost and Eaton pull together a solid tale about a regular guy getting caught up in a world he barely understands and adapting.[10]

Prints[edit]

Issues[edit]

No. Title Cover date Comic Book Roundup rating Estimated sales (first month)
#1 "Shattered Heroes: Part 1" January 2012 6.3 by five professional critics.[11] 32,222, ranked 67th in North America[12]
#2 "Shattered Heroes: Part 2" February 2012 6.6 by three professional critics.[13] 21,702, ranked 93th in North America[14]
#3 "Shattered Heroes: Part 3" March 2012 7.5 by three professional critics.[15] 18,102, ranked 104th in North America[16]
#4 "Shattered Heroes: Part 4" April 2012 7.1 by four professional critics.[17] 16,753, ranked 120th in North America[18]
#5 "Shattered Heroes: Part 5" May 2012 8.5 by two professional critics.[19] 15,481, ranked 119th in North America[20]
#6 "Shattered Heroes: Part 6" June 2012 6.2 by eight professional critics.[21] 15,011, ranked 124th in North America[22]

Collected editions[edit]

Title
[Tagline]
Format Material collected Pages Publication date ISBN Estimated sales (North America)
[Trades]
Rated
Battle Scars Trade paperback Battle Scars 1-6 136 June 2012 ISBN 0785163409
ISBN 978-0785163404
12+[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ign.com/articles/2012/04/26/battle-scars-6-review
  2. ^ "Out With The Old And In With The New: Black Nick Fury Jnr. Comes To 616 – But Is There Still A Place For His Pop's?". Bad Haven. 2012-04-27. Archived from the original on 2012-04-29. Retrieved 2017-01-24.
  3. ^ Truitt, Brian (April 24, 2012). "Agent Coulson charges into comics with 'Battle Scars'". USA Today. Retrieved April 24, 2012.
  4. ^ Battle Scars #2. Marvel Comics.
  5. ^ Battle Scars #4. Marvel Comics.
  6. ^ Battle Scars #5. Marvel Comics.
  7. ^ Battle Scars #6. Marvel Comics.
  8. ^ "BATTLE SCARS". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  9. ^ http://www.ign.com/articles/2012/04/26/battle-scars-6-review
  10. ^ http://comicsbulletin.com/miniseries-review-battle-scars-1-6-6/
  11. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #1". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  12. ^ "November 2011 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  13. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #2". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  14. ^ "December 2011 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  15. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #3". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  16. ^ "January 2012 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  17. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #4". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  18. ^ "February 2012 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  19. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #5". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  20. ^ "March 2012 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  21. ^ "BATTLE SCARS #6". Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  22. ^ "April 2012 Comic Book Sales Figures". comichron.com. Estimated Comics Sold to North American Comics Shops as Reported by Diamond Comic Distributors. The Comics Chronicles. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  23. ^ https://comicstore.marvel.com/Battle-Scars/digital-comic/29213

External links[edit]