Battle of Kursk order of battle

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The Battle of Kursk order of battle is a list of the significant units that fought in the Battle of Kursk between July and August 1943.

Units smaller than division size and Soviet aviation divisions are not shown in this order of battle.

German[edit]

Army Group Centre (Günther von Kluge)[edit]

Army Group South (Erich von Manstein)[edit]

Luftwaffe[edit]

Soviet[edit]

Western Front[edit]

The following units were included in the Western Front, commanded by Colonel General Vasily Sokolovsky.[4]

50th Army[edit]

The 50th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Ivan Boldin and included the following units.[5]

11th Guards Army[edit]

The 11th Guards Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Ivan Bagramyan, and included the following units.[6]

1st Air Army[edit]

The 1st Air Army, commanded by Lieutenant General Mikhail Gromov, included the following units.[7]

Front assets[edit]

The following units were directly subordinated to the front.[8]

Bryansk Front[edit]

The Bryansk Front was commanded by Colonel General Markian Popov, and consisted of the following units.[9]

3rd Army[edit]

The 3rd Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Alexander Gorbatov, and included the following units.[10]

61st Army[edit]

The 61st Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Pavel Belov and included the following units.[11]

63rd Army[edit]

The 63rd Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Vladimir Kolpakchi, and included the following units.[12]

15th Air Army[edit]

The 15th Air Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Nikolai Naumenko, and included the following units.[12]

Front Assets[edit]

The following units were directly subordinated to the front.[13]

Central Front[edit]

The Central Front was commanded by Army General Konstantin Rokossovsky, and consisted of the following units:[14]

13th Army[edit]

The 13th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Nikolai Pukhov, and included the following units:[15]

48th Army[edit]

The 48th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Prokofy Romanenko, and including the following units:[16]

60th Army[edit]

The 60th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Ivan Chernyakhovsky and included the following units:[17]

65th Army[edit]

The 65th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Pavel Batov, and was composed of the following units:[18]

70th Army[edit]

The 70th Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Ivan Galanin, and included the following units:[19]

2nd Tank Army[edit]

The 2nd Tank Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Alexey Rodin, who was replaced by Lieutenant General Semyon Bogdanov on 2 August. It consisted of the following units:[20]

16th Air Army[edit]

The 16th Air Army was commanded by Lieutenant General Sergei Rudenko, and included the following units:[21]

Front Assets[edit]

The following units were directly subordinated to the front:[22]

Voronezh Front (Nikolai Vatutin)[edit]

Steppe Front[edit]

The following units were part of the Steppe Front, commanded by Ivan Konev. The front was formed from the Steppe Military District on 9 July,[23] to serve as a reserve if the German attack broke through and to provide fresh troops for a counterattack to begin as soon as the German attack was halted. This order of battle does not show the complete composition of the Steppe Front. In addition to the units listed below, there are also the 4th Guards, 27th, 47th and 53rd Armies.[24] The 4th Guards,[25] 27th, 47th, and the 53rd Armies were held in reserve during the battle and thus did not participate.[26] The 5th Guards Army and the 5th Guards Army were both committed to the counterattack in the Battle of Prokhorovka, where they fought as part of the Voronezh Front.[27]

5th Guards Army[edit]

The following units were part of the 5th Guards Army, commanded by Lieutenant General Alexey Zhadov. The 10th Tank Corps was directly subordinated to the front on 7 July and became part of the 1st Tank Army on 8 July. Also on 8 July, the 5th Guards Army was transferred to the Voronezh Front.[28]

5th Guards Tank Army[edit]

The 5th Guards Tank Army consisted of the following units, under the command of Lieutenant General Pavel Rotmistrov. The 18th Tank Corps joined the army from the Reserve of the High Command on 7 July. The army was transferred to the Voronezh Front on 11 July.[30]

5th Air Army[edit]

The 5th Air Army included the following units, and was commanded by Lieutenant General Sergei Goryunov.[31] It entered combat in mid-July.[32]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Holm, Michael. "Luftflotte 4". www.ww2.dk. Retrieved 2016-08-22. 
  2. ^ a b Clark 2012, p. 200.
  3. ^ Holm, Michael. "Luftflotte 6". www.ww2.dk. Retrieved 2016-08-22. 
  4. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 290.
  5. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 290–291.
  6. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 291–293.
  7. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 293.
  8. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 293–295.
  9. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 295.
  10. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 295–296.
  11. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 296–297.
  12. ^ a b Glantz & House 2004, p. 297.
  13. ^ Glantz & House, pp. 298–299.
  14. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 299.
  15. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 299–301.
  16. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 301–302.
  17. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 302.
  18. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 302–303.
  19. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 303–304.
  20. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 304.
  21. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 305.
  22. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 305–306.
  23. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 322.
  24. ^ Clark 2012, p. 204.
  25. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 244.
  26. ^ Dunn 2008, pp. 75–78.
  27. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 113.
  28. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 323–324.
  29. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 323.
  30. ^ Glantz & House 2004, pp. 326–327.
  31. ^ Glantz & House 2004, p. 328.
  32. ^ Zetterling & Frankson 2000, p. 75.

References[edit]

  • Clark, Lloyd (2012). Kursk: The Greatest Battle: Eastern Front 1943. London: Headline Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-7553-3639-5. 
  • Dunn, Walter S. (2008) [1997]. Kursk: Hitler's Gamble, 1943. Mechanicsburg, PA, USA: Stackpole. ISBN 9781461751229. 
  • Zetterling, Niklas; Frankson, Anders (2000). Kursk 1943: A Statistical Analysis. Cass Series on the Soviet (Russian) Study of War. London: Frank Cass. ISBN 0-7146-5052-8. 
  • Frankson, Anders; Niklas Zetterling (2002). "Styrkorna inför den tyska offensiven". Slaget om Kursk. Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag. ISBN 91-1-301078-6. 
  • Glantz, David M.; House, Jonathan M. (2004) [1999]. The Battle of Kursk. Lawrence, KS, USA: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 978-0-7006-1335-9.