Battle of Leckmelm

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Battle of Leckmelm
Part of the Scottish clan wars
Leckmelm Vista - geograph.org.uk - 767890.jpg
Leckmelm
Date 1586
Location Leckmelm, Scottish Highlands, Scotland
57°52′08″N 5°05′38″W / 57.869°N 5.0939°W / 57.869; -5.0939Coordinates: 57°52′08″N 5°05′38″W / 57.869°N 5.0939°W / 57.869; -5.0939
Result Clan MacLeod, Mackay of Aberach & Sutherland victory
Belligerents
Clan Gunn Mackays of Aberach
Clan Sutherland
MacLeods of Assynt
Commanders and leaders
Niel Mackay, V of Aberach
William Sutherland of Killipheder
James MacLeod
Strength
Unknown Unknown
Casualties and losses
32 killed[1] Unknown

The Battle of Leckmelm was a Scottish clan battle that took place in 1586, in the Scottish Highlands. It was fought between the Clan Gunn against the Clan Sutherland, Mackays of Aberach and the MacLeods of Assynt.

Background[edit]

The Battle of Leckmelm was fought shortly after the Battle of Allt Camhna had taken place where the Clan Gunn, supported by men of the Clan Mackay had defeated the Clan Sinclair from Caithness.[2] Another branch of the Clan Mackay, the Mackays of Aberach were enemies of the Gunns at this time and fought against them at Leckmelm.[2][3][1]

Battle[edit]

An account of the Battle of Leckmelm is written in the book "History of the House and Clan of the Name Mackay" by Robert Mackay, quoting from 17th century historian Sir Robert Gordon:

In consequence of this defeat at Allt Camhna, Lord Caithness was exasperated against the Guns, and Hugh MacKay withdrew from them his support. Caithness and Sutherland, with their forces, met at Bengrime in Sutherland, along with Sir Patrick Gordon of Achindown, who was sent north by Huntly, with a determinate resolution to exterminate them. This service was now laid upon Sutherland, as his men had not come forward at the late conflict. The Sutherland-men, under command of William Sutherland, grandson of Alexander the heir, were joined by Niel MacKay and his clan, together with James Macleod, chieften of the Slight-ean-Voir and the MacLeods of his tribe. The Guns took the alarm, and fled towards the Western Isles; "but as they were on their journey thither, James Mack-Rory (Macleod) and Niel Mack-ean-Mack-William (Mackay of Aberach), rencountered with them at Lochbroom, at place called Leckmelm, where after a sharp skirmish, the clan Gun were overthrown, and most part of their company slain."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Foulis Press, 1764, "The History of the Feuds and Conflicts Among the Clans in the Northern Parts of Scotland and in the Western Isles: from the year M.XX1 unto M.B.C.XIX, now first published from a manuscript wrote in the reign of King James VI." The only changes made is the modernising of the orthography to 1890 standards:-- . electricscotland.com. Retrieved on January 06, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Mackay, Angus. (1906). The Book of Mackay. (St Andrews University). Printed by William Rae, Wick. pp. 112.
  3. ^ Gordon, Sir Robert (1580 - 1656). A Genealogical History of the Earldom of Sutherland. Originally written between 1615 and 1625. Republished in 1813. pp. 183.
  4. ^ Mackay, Robert. (1829). History of the House and Clan of the Name MacKay. pp. 151 - 152. Quoting: Gordon, Sir Robert. (1580–1656). A Genealogical History of the Earldom of Sutherland. pp. 184.

External links[edit]