Battle of Lomas Valentinas

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Battle of Lomas Valentinas
Part of the Paraguayan War
Lomas Vallentinas.jpg
Battle of Lomas Valentinas
Date December 21–27, 1868
Location Itá Ybaté, Central Department, Paraguay
Result Allied victory
Belligerents

 Paraguay

Empire of BrazilEmpire of Brazil


 Argentina


 Uruguay

Commanders and leaders
Paraguay Francisco Solano López Empire of BrazilDuke of Caxias
Strength
3,000 men[1]:95 19,415 men[1]:95
Casualties and losses
1,500 killed, 1,500 captured[1]:98 Argentina: 64 killed and 283 wounded
Brazil: 382 killed and 2461 wounded
Uruguay: 80 casualties[1]:97–98

The Battle of Lomas Valentinas (also known as the Battle of Ita Ybate) was fought in the Central Department of Paraguay on December 21–27, 1868. The Paraguayan Army, led personally by President Francisco Solano Lopez, were decisively defeated, though he managed to escape. On December 30, 1868, the Paraguayan garrison at Angostura, with 1,907 men, surrendered to the Allies.[1]:95–99

Battle[edit]

Charge of the Argentine infantary at Lomas Valentinas.

Marshal Caxias had left Villeta at 02:00 on the 21st, and was ready to storm the Lomas Valentinas range by noon. Two columns of infantry, one under Gen. Jose Luis Mena Barreto attacking the western defenses at Ita Ybate, and another under Gen. Jacinto Machado de Bittencourt aided by cavalry under Gen. Andrade Neves attacking the northern defenses at Loma Acosta, where the hill of Cumbarity was located. The hill was taken by sundown.[1]:95–96

On the 22 Dec., Argentine and Uruguay troops advanced towards Lomas Auxilio. Marshal Caxias spent the 23rd reorganizing his battalions. On the 24th, Marshal Caxias demanded the surrender of Lopez, which was refused. The Allied assault commended again with dawn on the 25th and the 26th. The Paraguayan defenses were finally taken on the 27th.[1]:97–98

Aftermath[edit]

Lopez made his escape with the Acavera cavalry acting as his escort. Gens. Resquín and Bernardino Caballero also escaped. This meant the war would continue.[1]:98

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Hooker, T.D., 2008, The Paraguayan War, Nottingham: Foundry Books, ISBN 1901543153