Bauan

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Bauan
Municipality of Bauan
BauanChurchjf9469 23.JPG
Official seal of Bauan
Seal
Map of Batangas with Bauan highlighted
Map of Batangas with Bauan highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Bauan is located in Philippines
Bauan
Bauan
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 13°47′30″N 121°00′31″E / 13.7917°N 121.0085°E / 13.7917; 121.0085Coordinates: 13°47′30″N 121°00′31″E / 13.7917°N 121.0085°E / 13.7917; 121.0085
Country Philippines
RegionCalabarzon (Region IV-A)
ProvinceBatangas
District2nd District
FoundedMay 3, 1596 [1]
Barangays40 (see Barangays)
Government
[2]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorRyanh M. Dolor
 • Vice MayorJulian C. Casapao
 • CongressmanRaneo E. Abu
 • Electorate56,158 voters (2019)
Area
[3]
 • Total53.31 km2 (20.58 sq mi)
Population
 (2015 census) [4]
 • Total91,297
 • Density1,700/km2 (4,400/sq mi)
 • Households
20,241
Economy
 • Income class1st municipal income class
 • Poverty incidence3.26% (2015)[5]
 • Revenue₱293,474,012.98 (2016)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
4201
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)43
Climate typetropical monsoon climate
Native languagesTagalog
Websitewww.bauan.gov.ph

Bauan, officially the Municipality of Bauan (Tagalog: Bayan ng Bauan), is a 1st class municipality in the province of Batangas, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 91,297 people. [4]

History[edit]

Religious attribution and miracles[edit]

The Augustinian church of Bauan was founded as a visita (small chapel without a resident priest) in 1590 on the slopes of Mount Macolod, along Taal Lake's southern shore. The resident priest of Taal, Father Diego de Avila would visit periodically and attend to the spiritual needs of the settlement.[6]

Five years after the establishment of the ecclesiastical mission of Bauan, a giant cross made of anubing was found in a Diñgin (a place of worship) near the town of Alitagtag. In 1790, Castro y Amoedo found a Tagalog document in the Bauan Cathedral Archives, signed by 25 Indio elders, stating the cross was made around 1595, as protection from ghosts surrounding the Tolo fountain. Subsequent miracles were associated with this cross. On 3 May, the 2.5 m tall cross was brought to the Chapel of Alitagtag. A golden sun, with a human face, and radiating rays was added, while the devout would cut away pieces of the cross to make talisman replicas. The elders also thought the cross protected the town from pestilence, locusts, drought, volcanic eruptions, and Moro pirates.[6]

Today, the traditional folk dance of Bauan, subli, is a religious homage to the Cross of Alitagtag. The dance is performed at a sambahan (place of worship), two of which are natural grottos along the shore of Taal Lake, and one of which is called Diñgin.[6]

Bauan became an independent parish on 12 May 1596, but was re-annexed to Taal, its matriz (mother town), because of too few tributos (taxpayers). Due to Taal Volcano eruptions, the town moved to Durungao (lookout point), led by Father Jose Rodriguez, in 1662. The town moved again in 1671 to Loual, along Taal's Seno de Bauan. An earthquake struck the town in 1677. In 1689, Father Nicolas de Rivera helped the town build its third church. In 1690, Father Rivera, with the help of the Taal parish priest Father Simon Martinez, moved the town to the seaside, its present location. However, a typhoon destroyed the church in 1692.[6]

A fourth stone church was built from 1695 to 1710. The current church was built in 1762 by Father Jose Victoria and Don Juan Bandino. A fort was built in 1775 to protect the town from Moro raids.[6]

Fr. Jose Vitoria introduced the cultivation of indigo in Bauan while building the present church. This was continued until 1856 during the administrations of Fr. Jose Trevino and Fr. Hipolito Huerta. It was completed under the supervision of Fr. Felipe Bravo in 1881. From there until 1894, final decorations were supervised by Fr. Moises Santos and Fr. Felipe Garcia. The church is said to be the most artistically built in the province of Batangas during that time. Father Bravo was also an imminent botanist who put up a museum of natural history and collected rare books that were lost when the church was razed by fire during the Philippine revolution against Spain in 1898. The church was probably rebuilt and again destroyed by fire in 1938. It has been restored since then.

In March 2019, the Black Nazarene visited the church to help funds for rebuilding after the church was damaged in the 2017 Batangas earthquakes.

The town of Bauan used to encompass a much more extensive area. However, throughout history, chunks of Bauan have been converted into municipalities; San Jose in 1765, San Luis in 1861, Alitagtag in 1901, Mabini in 1918, and San Pascual in 1969.

Geography[edit]

Bauan is one of the lowland towns of central Batangas that hosts some mountains and hills, with the tallest; Mount Durungao. It also has beach resorts with Sampaguita Beach in barangay Sampaguita in the western part of the town considered one of the more notable ones.[7][better source needed][8][better source needed]

The town is bounded by the municipality of San Luis to the north, the municipality of San Pascual to the east, and the municipality of Mabini to the south/southwest. It is also bordered by Balayan Bay to the west and Batangas Bay to the southeast. Vehicles can access the municipality coming from those towns by way of large thoroughfares such as the Palico-Balayan-Batangas Road, the Bauan-Mabini Road and Makalintal Avenue.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the municipality has a land area of 53.31 square kilometres (20.58 sq mi)[3] constituting 1.71% of the 3,119.75-square-kilometre- (1,204.54 sq mi) total area of Batangas.

Barangays[edit]

Bauan is politically subdivided into 40 barangays.[9]

Barangay San Teodoro was created in 1953 from the sitio of Pook ng Buhangin from Barrio Ilat and the sitio of Cupang from Barrio Gelerang Kawayan.[10] In 1954, the sitio of Jipit in the barrio of San Antonio was converted into the barrio of Santo Niño,[11] while the sitio of Pook ni Banal in the Barrio of Malaking Pook was converted into the barrio of Pook ni Banal.[12] The next year, sitio Pinagcurusan in barrio Maricaban and sitio Pinagcurusan in barrio Tingloy were constituted into barrio San Jose,[13] while sitio Pirasan in barrio Payapa was constituted into the barrio of San Juan.[14] In 1956 portions of San Andres and Bolo were separated to form the barrio of San Miguel.[15] The next year, sitio Puting Buhangin of barrio Magalanggalang was converted into barrio Orense.[16]

PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a.
2015[4] 2010[17]
041006001 Alagao 2.7% 2,496 1,836 6.02%
041006002 Aplaya 8.8% 8,038 7,604 1.06%
041006003 As‑Is 2.6% 2,344 2,239 0.88%
041006004 Bagong Silang 0.5% 457 410 2.09%
041006005 Baguilawa 1.7% 1,535 1,412 1.60%
041006006 Balayong 3.0% 2,746 2,496 1.83%
041006007 Barangay I (Poblacion) 1.8% 1,619 1,492 1.57%
041006008 Barangay II (Poblacion) 3.4% 3,148 3,062 0.53%
041006009 Barangay III (Poblacion) 0.6% 583 556 0.91%
041006010 Barangay IV (Poblacion) 3.3% 2,977 2,432 3.93%
041006011 Bolo 5.8% 5,311 4,212 4.51%
041006012 Colvo 0.6% 545 495 1.85%
041006013 Cupang 2.1% 1,897 1,808 0.92%
041006014 Durungao 1.9% 1,776 1,487 3.44%
041006015 Gulibay 1.5% 1,352 1,419 −0.92%
041006016 Inicbulan 4.0% 3,674 3,007 3.89%
041006018 Locloc 1.7% 1,517 1,605 −1.07%
041006019 Magalang‑Galang 0.4% 340 345 −0.28%
041006020 Malindig 0.4% 358 391 −1.66%
041006021 Manalupang 1.5% 1,352 1,065 4.65%
041006022 Manghinao Proper 11.8% 10,789 7,974 5.93%
041006023 Manghinao Uno 2.8% 2,556 2,378 1.38%
041006024 New Danglayan 2.1% 1,878 1,757 1.28%
041006025 Orense 0.8% 742 712 0.79%
041006026 Pitugo 0.9% 801 643 4.27%
041006028 Rizal 0.8% 745 699 1.22%
041006029 Sampaguita 0.6% 522 536 −0.50%
041006030 San Agustin 1.1% 1,046 931 2.24%
041006031 San Andres Proper 2.9% 2,674 2,623 0.37%
041006032 San Andres Uno 0.7% 654 584 2.18%
041006033 San Diego 0.6% 521 518 0.11%
041006034 San Miguel 2.0% 1,818 1,829 −0.11%
041006035 San Pablo 0.9% 838 814 0.55%
041006036 San Pedro 2.5% 2,327 2,080 2.16%
041006037 San Roque 7.3% 6,634 6,110 1.58%
041006038 San Teodoro 2.0% 1,788 1,627 1.81%
041006039 San Vicente 0.9% 778 613 4.64%
041006041 Santa Maria 5.6% 5,129 4,763 1.42%
041006042 Santo Domingo 2.6% 2,407 2,285 1.00%
041006044 Sinala 2.8% 2,585 2,502 0.62%
Total 91,297 81,351 2.22%

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Bauan, Batangas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 29
(84)
30
(86)
31
(88)
33
(91)
32
(90)
30
(86)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
30
(86)
Average low °C (°F) 20
(68)
20
(68)
21
(70)
22
(72)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
23
(73)
22
(72)
21
(70)
22
(72)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 11
(0.4)
13
(0.5)
14
(0.6)
32
(1.3)
101
(4.0)
142
(5.6)
208
(8.2)
187
(7.4)
175
(6.9)
131
(5.2)
68
(2.7)
39
(1.5)
1,121
(44.3)
Average rainy days 5.2 5.0 7.4 11.5 19.8 23.5 27.0 25.9 25.2 23.2 15.5 8.3 197.5
Source: Meteoblue [18] (Use with caution: this is modeled/calculated data, not measured locally.)

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Bauan
YearPop.±% p.a.
1903 39,094—    
1918 27,729−2.26%
1939 37,043+1.39%
1948 40,168+0.90%
1960 41,147+0.20%
1970 36,862−1.09%
1975 38,200+0.72%
YearPop.±% p.a.
1980 43,560+2.66%
1990 59,258+3.13%
1995 64,190+1.51%
2000 72,604+2.68%
2007 79,831+1.32%
2010 81,351+0.69%
2015 91,297+2.22%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[4][17][19][20]

In the 2015 census, Bauan had a population of 91,297. [4] The population density was 1,700 inhabitants per square kilometre (4,400/sq mi).

Economy[edit]

Bauan is one of three political entities included in Metro Batangas, and as such has contributed to its continuous growth in businesses and population. It is also home to a handful of tourist destinations and points of interest.

Restaurants found in the national capital region Metro Manila have their branches in the town including Jollibee, McDonald's, Mang Inasal, and Greenwich. There are also some shopping centers and malls, including Citimart Bauan and Saveway. The town's market is also one of the biggest in Batangas.[citation needed] Fresh fruits, vegetables, meat, and fish are sold there. Household items such as brooms, appliances, sewing supplies can also be found in the town's market.

The town is home to the famous Londres, a soft bread coated in sugar, and Pianono, a rolled bread with cream inside. Across from the market is Rory's Refreshment & Eatery, where one of the best lomi in the country can be found.

While Bauan is known as "the Gateway to Mabini," an adjacent town known for its beaches, Bauan has Sampaguita beach. It is a long, white-sand beach that is relatively underdeveloped but fairly accessible. It is slowly becoming popular[citation needed] and is already being flocked by tourists. There is also a river in Bauan called the Abaksa River that can be found in between Inicbulan and Balayong. It is a fairly shallow river with cool waters and is also relatively underdeveloped.

Notable people[edit]

Batangas 2nd District Representative

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Patron Saints of Towns and Cities | Patron Saint of Different Municipalities in the Philippines". Flickr. 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2019-05-10.
  2. ^ Municipality of Bauan | Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
  3. ^ a b "Province: Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e Census of Population (2015). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  5. ^ "PSA releases the 2015 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Quezon City, Philippines. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e Hargrove, Thomas (1991). The Mysteries of Taal: A Philippine volcano and lake, her sea life and lost towns. Manila: Bookmark Publishing. pp. 75–101. ISBN 9715690467.
  7. ^ Beltran, Maria Rona. "SAMPAGUITA BEACH RESORT IN BAUAN, BATANGAS".
  8. ^ iviangita (27 April 2016). "Sampaguita Beach: A Hidden Gem in Batangas".
  9. ^ "Municipal: Bauan". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  10. ^ "An Act to Create the Barrio of San Teodoro in the Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-09.
  11. ^ "An Act to Convert the Sitio of Jipit, in the Barrio of San Antonio, Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas, into a Barrio to Be Known As the Barrio of Santo Niño". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-11.
  12. ^ "An Act to Convert the Sitio of Pook Ni Banal in the Barrio of Malaking Pook, Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas, into a Barrio". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-11.
  13. ^ "An Act Creating the Barrio of San Jose, Maricaban Island, Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
  14. ^ "An Act Creating the Barrio of San Juan in Maricaban Island, Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
  15. ^ "An Act Creating the Barrio of San Miguel in the Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
  16. ^ "An Act Converting the Sitio of Puting Buhangin, Barrio Magalanggalang, Municipality of Bauan, Province of Batangas, into a Barrio of Said Municipality to Be Known As the Barrio of Orense". LawPH.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-09. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
  17. ^ a b Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  18. ^ "Bauan: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Meteoblue. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  19. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  20. ^ "Province of Batangas". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.

Further reading[edit]

  • Thomas R. Hargrove, The Mysteries of Taal: A Philippine Volcano and Lake, Her Sea Life and Lost Towns

External links[edit]