Beacon Solar Project

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Beacon Solar Project
CountryUnited States
LocationKern County, California
Coordinates35°15′25″N 118°00′47″W / 35.257°N 118.013°W / 35.257; -118.013Coordinates: 35°15′25″N 118°00′47″W / 35.257°N 118.013°W / 35.257; -118.013
StatusOperational
Construction began2014
Commission date2017
Owner(s)Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
Solar farm
TypeFlat-panel PV
Site area2,500 acres (1,000 ha)
Power generation
Nameplate capacity250 MWac

The Beacon Solar Project is a photovoltaic power station in the northwestern Mojave Desert, near California City in eastern Kern County, California.[1][2] Split into five phases, the Beacon solar facilities combined generate 250 MW of renewable energy for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).[2] The five projects, completed in December 2017 total 903,434 panels.[3]

The Beacon Solar Project was originally proposed by NextEra Energy using parabolic trough mirrors. LADWP acquired the entitled project site in 2012 and changed it to cheaper photovoltaic technology.[4] LADWP contracted Hecate Energy to develop three phases of 162 MW and SunEdison to develop 88 MW in two phases.[5] SunEdison's stake in the project was later acquired by Capital Dynamics.[6] Hecate Energy's stake in the project was acquired by sPower[7] (Sustainable Power), and was completed by sPower, who was later acquired by AES.

In October 2018, LADWP commissioned the Beacon Battery Energy Storage System (BESS), with 10 MWh/20 MW of storage to stabilize the energy sent to the grid by the solar panels.[3]

Projects[edit]

The Beacon Solar Project consists of 5 solar power station projects:

  • Beacon 1 — a 56 MWac solar power station using photovoltaics, which began commercial operations in early 2017.[8]
  • Beacon 2 — a proposed 48 MWac solar power station using photovoltaics, commissioned in December 2017.[9][10]
  • Beacon 3 — a 56 MWac solar power station using photovoltaics, which began commercial operations in early 2017.[11]
  • Beacon 4 — a 50 MWac solar power station using photovoltaics, which began commercial operations in early 2017.[12]
  • Beacon 5 — a proposed 40 MWac solar power station using photovoltaics, commissioned in December 2017.[9][10]

Production[edit]

Generation (MW·h) of Beacon 3 [13]
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Total
2016 3,013 3,013
2017 6,373 7,630 12,961 6,373 16,330 49,667
Total 52,680
Generation (MW·h) of Beacon 4 [14]
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Total
2016 4,962 4,962
2017 5,186 6,525 11,301 5,186 14,017 42,215
Total 47,177

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Draft Environmental Impact Report: Beacon Photovoltaic Project" (PDF). Kern County Planning and Community Development Department. July 2012.
  2. ^ a b "LADWP Begins Construction on Major Solar Project that Will Deliver 300 MW of Solar Power to Los Angeles" (Press release). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. July 25, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Tucker, Carol. "Beacon of Light: A Solar Plant Shines in the Mojave Desert". digital.apogee-mg.com. Retrieved 2020-01-23.
  4. ^ Clarke, Chris (July 22, 2014). "L.A. to Break Ground on Big Desert Solar Project". KCET.
  5. ^ "Amendment to the Beacon Sites 1, 3, and 4 PPAs" (PDF). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. April 27, 2016.
  6. ^ "Resolution No. 017-110" (PDF). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. November 15, 2016.
  7. ^ "sPower Gets $434M in Financing for Its Beacon Solar Projects". sPower. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Beacon 1". Hecate Energy LLC.
  9. ^ a b "Beacon Solar Project - Amendment No. 1 to the Power Purchase Agreements, Interconnection Agreements, Ground Lease, and Option Agreements for Power Purchase Agreements" (PDF). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. November 22, 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Resolution No. 014-229" (PDF). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. June 5, 2014. p. 6.
  11. ^ "Beacon 3". Hecate Energy LLC.
  12. ^ "Beacon 4". Hecate Energy LLC.
  13. ^ "Hecate Energy Beacon 3, Monthly". Electricity Data Browser. Energy Information Administration. Retrieved July 30, 2017.
  14. ^ "Hecate Energy Beacon 4, Monthly". Electricity Data Browser. Energy Information Administration. Retrieved July 30, 2017.