Beall's Pleasure

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Beall's Pleasure
Bealls Pleasure 1936 HABS.jpg
Bealls Pleasure, 1936 HABS Photo
Beall's Pleasure is located in Maryland
Beall's Pleasure
Beall's Pleasure is located in the US
Beall's Pleasure
Location 7250 Old Landover Road, Landover, Maryland[2]
Coordinates 38°55′51″N 76°53′10″W / 38.93083°N 76.88611°W / 38.93083; -76.88611Coordinates: 38°55′51″N 76°53′10″W / 38.93083°N 76.88611°W / 38.93083; -76.88611
Built 1795 - 1936
Architect Unknown
Architectural style Other, Federal
NRHP Reference # 79003169 [1]
Added to NRHP May 04, 1979

Beall's Pleasure is a historic home located in Landover, Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. It was built in 1795 as the summer home of Benjamin Stoddert[3] who later became the first Secretary of the Navy.[4]

The building is a 2-story Federal brick house with a 1 12-story brick wing added in 1936. The building is 5 bays wide in the front and 3 at the rear. The brick has been laid in common bond.[2]

The garden was landscaped in 1936, by Boris V. Timchenko, long-time chief architect of the annual National Capital Flower and Garden Show, and later designer of gardens for President John F. Kennedy and Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower.[2][5]

Beall's Pleasure was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c "Historic American Buildings Survey". HABS-No. MD-635. National Park Service: 1. Archived from the original on 2012-12-13. 
  3. ^ "Historic American Buildings Survey". HABS-No. MD-635. National Park Service: 3. Archived from the original on 2012-12-12. 
  4. ^ Scharf, J. Thomas (1879). History of Maryland: From the Earliest Period to the Present Day. Baltimore: John B. Piet. Vol. II, p. 437.
  5. ^ Christopher Owens (October 1974). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Beall's Pleasure" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved 2015-08-01. 

External links[edit]