Bee Wilson

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Beatrice Dorothy "Bee" Wilson (born 7 March 1974) is a British food writer, journalist and historian and the author of five books on food-related subjects. Her writing has consistently looked at food in its broadest sense, as it relates to history, ideas and human life.[1] The New Yorker writer Jane Kramer noted in 2013 that 'Bee Wilson describes herself as a food writer. That's half the story'.[2] In The New York Times Dawn Drzal described Wilson as "a congenial kitchen oracle".[3] In "Consider the Fork" Wilson wrote about the history of kitchen technology, from fire to the AeroPress.[4] In an interview in 2015, Wilson said that her next book, First Bite: How We Learn to Eat, was about developing a healthy relationship with food: "We don't have an instinct that tells us what to eat ... It's not a moral thing. It's a skill we learn".[5]

For twelve years, Wilson wrote the 'Kitchen Thinker' column in the Sunday Telegraph's "Stella" magazine [6] for which she was three times named the Guild of Food Writers food journalist of the year, in 2004, 2008 and 2009.[7] Before that, for five years from 1998 she was the food critic of the New Statesman magazine, where she often wrote about school meals.[8]

Wilson has also written book reviews and other articles about food and other subjects for a wide range of publications including The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Times Literary Supplement.[9][10] She has written several "Page Turner" blogs for The New Yorker on ideas about the recipe.[11][12] She has also contributed articles to the London Review of Books, on subjects not related to food, such as film, biography, history and music. [13]

Wilson is the author of five books, The Hive: The Story of the Honeybee and Us (2004), Swindled: From Poison Sweets to Counterfeit Coffee, the Dark History of the Food Cheats (2008), a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week, "Sandwich: A Global History", Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat (Basic Books; October, 2012) and "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat" (Basic Books and Fourth Estate 2015).

Wilson is chair of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery.[14]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Hive: The Story of the Honeybee and Us, John Murray, 2004
  • Swindled: From Poison Sweets to Counterfeit Coffee, John Murray (UK) and Princeton University Press (US) 2008
  • Sandwich: A Global History, Reaktion Books, 2010
  • Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat, Basic Books, 2012
  • First Bite: How We Learn to Eat, Basic Books (U.S.) and Fourth Estate (U.K.)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kramer, Jane. "'A Fork of One's Own'". The New Yorker. 
  2. ^ Kramer, Jane. "A Fork of One's Own". Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  3. ^ Drzal, Dawn. "The Science of Sizzle". Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  4. ^ Poole, Steven. "Consider the Fork Review". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  5. ^ Finney, Clare. "It's Not Naughty. It's Not Virtuous. It's Food.". Borough Market. 
  6. ^ "Telegraph website". Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  7. ^ "Guild Of Food Writers". Gfw.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-07-27. 
  8. ^ Bee Wilson "Food", New Statesman, 17 March 2002
  9. ^ Bee Wilson, Bee "The Baguette is Back", Times Literary Supplement, 6 June 2007
  10. ^ Bee Wilson "Smell the Coffee", Times Literary Supplement, 31 October 2007
  11. ^ Wilson, Bee. "Pleasures of the Literary Meal". The New Yorker. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  12. ^ Wilson, Bee. "The Allure of Imagined Meals". The New Yorker. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  13. ^ London Review of Books. "Bee Wilson". London Review of Books. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  14. ^ Duguid, Naomi. "'Report on the Oxford Symposium 2015'". Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 

External links[edit]