Beinn Mheadhoin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Beinn Mheadhoin
Beinn Mheadhoin from Derry Cairngorm.jpg
Beinn Mheadhoin from the summit of Derry Cairngorm
Highest point
Elevation 1,182 m (3,878 ft) [1]
Prominence c. 254 m
Listing Marilyn, Munro
Translation Middle hill (Gaelic)
Pronunciation Scottish Gaelic: [ˈpeiɲ ˈviə.ɛɲ]
Location Moray, Scotland
Parent range Cairngorms
OS grid NJ024017
Topo map OS Landranger 36

Beinn Mheadhoin is a mountain in Scotland. By some counts it is the thirteenth-highest mountain of Great Britain. It lies in the very heart of the Cairngorm mountains, and is one of the most remote hills in the region.

The summit is broad and flat. It is noted for its summit tors; large boulders left by retreating ice sheets at the end of the last ice age. The highest point of the hill is, in fact, the top of one of the largest tors, and an easy scramble is required to reach it.

The mountain is remote; the shortest route is to climb over the main Cairn Gorm plateau in order to ascend Beinn Mheadhoin. The shortest route of ascent is from the Coire Cas car park at the foot of the Cairn Gorm ski area, initially heading for the ridge of Fiacaill a' Choire Chais. From the head of the ridge the walker then descends to Loch Avon via Coire Raibert. The route then goes round the head of the loch, passing the famous Shelter Stone, before rising again to reach Loch Etchachan. From here the route heads northeast onto the summit ridge. This route is about 20 kilometres (12 mi) in length, with 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) of ascent required.

Beinn Mheadhoin may also be climbed from the south, via Glen Derry. This route is much longer, though a bicycle can be used on the track to shorten the time taken. An ascent from this direction could conceivably be combined with an ascent of Derry Cairngorm.


  1. ^ "walkhighlands Beinn Mheadhoin". 2013. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 

Coordinates: 57°05′45″N 3°36′45″W / 57.09589°N 3.61246°W / 57.09589; -3.61246