Belfast Exposed

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Belfast Exposed
Belfast Exposed, Belfast, July 2010.JPG
Belfast Exposed in 2010
Established1983 (1983)
Location23 Donegall Street, Belfast BT1 2FF
Coordinates54°36′04″N 5°55′41″W / 54.601°N 5.928°W / 54.601; -5.928
TypeIndependent
Websitewww.belfastexposed.org

Belfast Exposed is a photography gallery in Belfast, established in 1983.[1][2] It was Northern Ireland's first dedicated photographic gallery[3][4] and in 2018 Sean O'Hagan in The Guardian described it as "the key independent space for contemporary photography" there.[5] Belfast Exposed houses a 20×7 m gallery for the exhibition of contemporary photography, digital archive browsing facilities, a spacious black and white photographic darkroom and a digital editing suite in its Donegall Street premises.[6]

It was established "to challenge and subvert media representations of the Troubles-torn city".[5] The gallery has focused on the production of socially and politically engaged work, the development and exhibition of community photography. Training is used to encourage local communities to use photography to record and understand their environment.[7]

Belfast Exposed hosts an archive of half a million images, which were to be published online in a digital archive by March 2004.

The gallery is used as a venue during both the Belfast Film Festival and the Belfast Festival at Queen's.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Belfast Exposed – a photography gallery that crossed the sectarian divide". www.1854.photography. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  2. ^ "Belfast Exposed reveals initiatives to keep photo fans in the picture during lockdown". The Irish News. 22 April 2020. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  3. ^ Berning, Dale (5 August 2011). "Photography: Britain through a lens". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  4. ^ "Belfast Exposed - Northern Ireland's Premier Photography Organisation". Belfast Exposed. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  5. ^ a b "The best UK photography galleries chosen by Sean O'Hagan". The Guardian. 14 October 2018. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  6. ^ "NORTHERN IRELAND: 30 Years of Photography | The MAC". themaclive.com. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Belfast Exposed Photography | Culture24". www.culture24.org.uk. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Category: News". www.belfastexposed.org. Retrieved 25 June 2019.

External links[edit]