Belfast North (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 54°39′47″N 5°57′54″W / 54.663°N 5.965°W / 54.663; -5.965

Belfast North
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Belfast North in Northern Ireland.
Districts of Northern Ireland Belfast, Newtownabbey
Population 102,531 (2011 census)[1]
Electorate 67,422 (March 2011)
Current constituency
Created 1922
Member of parliament Nigel Dodds (DUP)
Number of members One
Created from Belfast Duncairn, Belfast Shankill
18851918
Number of members One
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced by Belfast Duncairn, Belfast Shankill
Created from Belfast
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency Northern Ireland

Belfast North is a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom House of Commons.

Boundaries[edit]

1950–1974: The County Borough of Belfast wards of Clifton, Duncairn, and Shankill.

1974–1983: The County Borough of Belfast wards of Clifton, Dock, Duncairn, and Shankill.

1983–1997: The District of Belfast wards of Ardoyne, Ballysillan, Bellevue, Castleview, Cavehill, Cliftonville, Crumlin, Duncairn, Fortwilliam, Grove, Legoniel, New Lodge, Shankill, and Woodvale.

1997–2010: The District of Belfast wards of Ardoyne, Ballysillan, Bellevue, Castleview, Cavehill, Chichester Park, Cliftonville, Crumlin, Duncairn, Fortwilliam, Legoniel, New Lodge, Water Works, and Woodvale, and the District of Newtownabbey wards of Abbey, Coole, Dunanney, Valley, and Whitehouse.

2010–present: The District of Belfast wards of Ardoyne, Ballysillan, Bellevue, Castleview, Cavehill, Chichester Park, Cliftonville, Crumlin, Duncairn, Fortwilliam, Legoniel, New Lodge, Water Works, and Woodvale, and the District of Newtownabbey wards of Abbey, Ballyhenry, Cloughfern, Collinbridge, Coole, Dunanney, Elmfeild, Glebe, Glengormley, Hightown, Valley, and Whitehouse.

The seat was created in 1922 when, as part of the establishment of the devolved Stormont Parliament for Northern Ireland, the number of MPs in the Westminster Parliament was drastically cut. The seat is centred on the north section of Belfast, though at times the area around the Docks on the north side of the Lagan Estuary has instead been part of variously Belfast East and Belfast West. Belfast North also contains part of the district of Newtownabbey.

Belfast North contains 14 wards of Belfast City Council and 5 of Newtownabbey Borough Council. The constituency suffered the highest level of violence in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and covers many areas synonymous with the conflict – the New Lodge, Ardoyne, Rathcoole, Ballysillan and Woodvale. The overall tenor of the constituency is working-class, with a high proportion of residents in public housing, and concentrations of low-income single people in the middle Antrim Road and Cliftonville areas. There are some upscale residential areas around Belfast Castle and on the slopes of Cavehill. Sectarian divisions are stark, with a number of Peace lines cutting through the constituency and occasional outbursts of sectarian street violence, and was the focus for post-ceasefire incidents such as the Holy Cross dispute.

At the boundary commission hearings in September 2005 prior to the 2010 general election, the SDLP proposed extending the seat to Cloughfern and Jordanstown. The DUP supported the addition of Cloughfern. Sinn Féin were generally supportive of the commission's proposals.

Following the revised recommendations, the Commission proposals were finalised and accepted by Parliament through the Northern Ireland Parliamentary Constituencies Order.[2]

History[edit]

Belfast North has historically had a narrow unionist majority, which has been gradually decreasing over time. The nationalist vote is considerable, and those from a Catholic background (47%) now slightly outnumber those from a Protestant background (46%), according to the 2011 census. It has generated particular interest for a number of highly unusual election results, as well as for several candidates and MPs prominently disagreeing with their parties.

Of the five main political parties in Northern Ireland, four (the Ulster Unionist Party, the Democratic Unionist Party, the Social Democratic and Labour Party and Sinn Féin) all have relatively strong support bases and routinely poll similar results. Other parties such as the Alliance, Progressive Unionist Party, Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, Conservatives and the Workers' Party have at times polled significantly, as have independent candidates, with the result that many elections have been won on comparatively low shares of the vote. The elections to the various assemblies have often seen the seats for the constituency heavily split – in 1998 no party won more than one Assembly seat.

The area saw a steady out movement of Protestants during the Troubles, to some degree replaced by a growing Catholic population, although the overall population of the area fell sharply. However, all the inner-city communities in the constituency are now haemorrhaging electors, and the overall ethnic composition of the constituency now seems stable.

The seat was consistently held by the Ulster Unionist Party from its creation until the 1970s. In 1972 the first notable dissent occurred when the sitting MP, Stratton Mills, dissented from the UUP's decision to withdraw from the Conservative whip at Westminster over the suspension of the Stormont Parliament. Mills remained as a Conservative MP, but the following year he joined the Alliance, giving them their only Westminster representation before 2010.

In the February 1974 general election the seat was won by John Carson of the Ulster Unionist Party with backing by the Vanguard Progressive Unionist Party and the Democratic Unionist Party on a united slate in opposition to the Sunningdale Agreement. Carson's victory came despite a majority of votes being cast for pro-Sunningdale candidates, albeit split between the Pro-Assembly Unionists, the Social Democratic and Labour Party and the Northern Ireland Labour Party. Carson held his seat in the October 1974 election but was deselected by the local Ulster Unionists over his support for the minority Labour government.

The 1979 general election saw one of the most dramatic results of all when Johnny McQuade of the Democratic Unionist Party won the seat with a mere 27.6% of the vote – the third lowest total for a successful candidate in a UK general election in the twentieth century. This came about due to the strong showing of several other parties, dividing the vote strongly. McQuade also had the distinction of being the oldest person to be initially elected to Westminster in the 20th century and did not stand at the next general election.

In 1983, Cecil Walker regained the seat for the UUP, beating Scotsman George Seawright of the DUP. In the 1987 general election the UUP and DUP agreed a pact in opposition to the Anglo Irish Agreement. Seawright had been expelled from the DUP and stood in the election, reviving the Protestant Unionist Party label, but was unsuccessful.

Walker continued to hold the seat until 2001 but gained a reputation for inactivity. In the 2001 general election the DUP contested the seat for the first time since 1983, with their candidate Nigel Dodds campaigning heavily on both their opposition to the Good Friday Agreement and Walker's record. Walker also suffered from a disastrous television interview during the campaign. In the election Walker's vote collapsed to a mere 12%, coming fourth whilst Dodds won the seat. The UUP vote fell even further in both the 2003 Assembly election and the 2005 general election.

Nigel Dodds became the DUP's deputy leader in 2008, but the 2010 general election saw Sinn Féin increase their vote share and reduce the DUP majority. Sinn Féin targeted the seat in the 2015 general election, campaigning on returning the constituency's first Irish nationalist MP and the growing Catholic population surpassing Protestants. However, the DUP and the UUP agreed an electoral pact in which the UUP would withdraw their candidate to help re-elect an unionist. This allowed for Dodds to hold the seat comfortably with an increased majority, although a 4.3% swing to Sinn Féin in the 2017 general election still confirmed the seat's marginal status.

Members of Parliament[edit]

The Member of Parliament since the 2001 general election has been Nigel Dodds of the Democratic Unionist Party. He defeated Cecil Walker of the Ulster Unionist Party, who had sat for the seat since 1983.

Election Member Party
1885 Sir William Ewart Conservative
1889 by-election Edward Harland Conservative
1896 by-election James Horner Haslett Conservative
1905 by-election Sir Daniel Dixon Irish Unionist
1907 by-election George Clark Irish Unionist
1910 Robert Thompson Irish Unionist
1918 constituency abolished
1922 constituency recreated
1922 T.E. McConnell Ulster Unionist
1929 Thomas Somerset Ulster Unionist
1945 William Frederick Neill Ulster Unionist
1950 H. Montgomery Hyde Ulster Unionist
1959 Stratton Mills Ulster Unionist
1972 Conservative
1973 Alliance
Feb 1974 John Carson Ulster Unionist
1979 John McQuade Democratic Unionist
1983 Cecil Walker Ulster Unionist
2001 Nigel Dodds Democratic Unionist

Monuments at Belfast City Hall – MPs for Belfast North

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2017: Belfast North[3][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Nigel Dodds 21,240 46.2 -0.8
Sinn Féin John Finucane 19,159 41.7 +7.8
Alliance Sam Nelson 2,475 5.4 -1.9
SDLP Martin McAuley 2,058 4.5 -3.7
Green (NI) Malachi O'Hara 644 1.4 N/A
Workers' Party Gemma Weir 360 0.8 -1.5
Majority 2,081 4.5 -8.6
Turnout 45,949 67.6 +8.4
Registered electors 68,249
DUP hold Swing -4.3
General Election 2015: Belfast North[5][6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Nigel Dodds 19,096 47.0 +7.0
Sinn Féin Gerry Kelly 13,770 33.9 -0.1
SDLP Alban Maginness 3,338 8.2 -4.1
Alliance Jason O'Neill[7] 2,941 7.3 +2.4
Workers' Party Gemma Weir 919 2.3 N/A
Independent Fra Hughes 529 1.3 N/A
Majority 5,326 13.1 +7.1
Turnout 40,593 59.2 +2.7
Registered electors 68,553
DUP hold Swing +3.5
General Election 2010: Belfast North[8][9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Nigel Dodds 14,812 40.0 -2.9
Sinn Féin Gerry Kelly 12,588 34.0 +7.1
SDLP Alban Maginness 4,544 12.3 -4.5
UCU-NF Fred Cobain 2,837 7.7 -1.8
Alliance Billy Webb 1,809 4.9 +2.0
Independent Martin McAuley 403 1.1 N/A
Majority 2,224 6.0 -11.0
Turnout 36,993 56.5 -1.1
Registered electors 65,504
DUP hold Swing -5.5

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Belfast North[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Nigel Dodds 13,935 45.6 +4.8
Sinn Féin Gerry Kelly 8,747 28.6 +3.4
SDLP Alban Maginness 4,950 16.2 -4.8
UUP Fred Cobain 2,154 7.1 -4.9
Alliance Marjorie Hawkins 438 1.4 N/A
Workers' Party Marcella Delaney 165 0.5 -0.1
Rainbow Dream Ticket Lynda Gilby 151 0.5 +0.2
Majority 5,188 17.0 +1.4
Turnout 30,540 57.8 -9.4
Registered electors 52,535
DUP hold Swing +0.7
General Election 2001: Belfast North[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Nigel Dodds 16,718 40.8 N/A
Sinn Féin Gerry Kelly 10,331 25.2 +5.0
SDLP Alban Maginness 8,592 21.0 +0.6
UUP Cecil Walker 4,904 12.0 -39.8
Workers' Party Marcella Delaney 253 0.6 -0.1
Rainbow Dream Ticket Rainbow George Weiss 134 0.3 N/A
Majority 6,387 15.6 N/A
Turnout 40,932 67.2 +3.0
Registered electors 60,941
DUP gain from UUP Swing

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Belfast North[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Cecil Walker 21,478 51.8 +0.1
SDLP Alban Maginness 8,454 20.4 +2.1
Sinn Féin Gerry Kelly 8,375 20.2 +8.9
Alliance Tom Campbell 2,221 5.4 −2.4
Green (NI) Peter Emerson 539 1.3 N/A
Workers' Party Paul Treanor 297 0.7 N/A
Natural Law Andrea Gribben 98 0.2 N/A
Majority 13,024 31.4 -2.5
Turnout 41,462 64.2 -1.0
Registered electors 64,645
UUP hold Swing -1.2

1997 Changes are compared to the 1992 notional results shown below.[13]

Notional 1992 UK General Election Result : Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP N/A 22,259 52.4 N/A
SDLP N/A 7,867 18.52 N/A
Sinn Féin N/A 4,882 11.5 N/A
Alliance N/A 3,321 7.8 N/A
NI Conservatives N/A 2,107 5.0 N/A
Others N/A 2,041 4.8 N/A
Majority 14,392 33.9 N/A
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1992: Belfast North[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Cecil Walker 17,240 48.0 +9.0
SDLP Alban Maginness 7,615 21.2 +5.5
Sinn Féin Paddy McManus 4,693 13.1 -0.7
Alliance Tom Campbell 2,246 6.3 -1.5
NI Conservatives Margaret Redpath 2,107 5.9 N/A
New Agenda Seamus Lynch 1,386 3.9 N/A
Workers' Party Margaret Smith 419 1.2 -7.1
Natural Law David O'Leary 208 0.6 N/A
Majority 9,625 26.8 +3.5
Turnout 35,914 65.2 +2.9
Registered electors 55,068
UUP hold Swing

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Belfast North[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Cecil Walker 14,355 39.0 +2.8
SDLP Alban Maginness 5,795 15.7 +1.7
Protestant Unionist George Seawright 5,671 15.4 N/A
Sinn Féin Paddy McManus 5,062 13.8 +0.9
Workers' Party Seamus Lynch 3,062 8.3 +2.6
Alliance Tom Campbell 2,871 7.8 -1.3
Majority 8,560 23.3 +6.6
Turnout 36,816 62.3 -7.1
Registered electors 59,124
UUP hold Swing
Belfast North by-election, 1986[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Cecil Walker 21,649 71.5 +35.3
Alliance Paul Richard Maguire 5,072 16.7 +7.6
Workers' Party Seamus Lynch 3,563 11.8 +6.1
Majority 16,577 54.8 +38.1
Turnout 30,284 51.5 -17.9
Registered electors 59,791
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1983: Belfast North[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Cecil Walker 15,339 36.2 +10.9
DUP George Seawright 8,260 19.5 -8.1
SDLP Brian Feeney 5,944 14.0 -4.5
Sinn Féin Joe Austin 5,451 12.9 N/A
Alliance Paul Maguire 3,879 9.1 -0.6
Workers' Party Seamus Lynch 2,412 5.7 N/A
Independent DUP William Gault 1,134 2.7 N/A
Majority 7,079 16.7 N/A
Turnout 42,419 69.4 +4.3
Registered electors 61,087
UUP gain from DUP Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
DUP Johnny McQuade 11,690 27.6 N/A
UUP Cecil Walker 10,695 25.3 -37.3
SDLP Paschal O'Hare 7,823 18.5 -6.6
Unionist Party NI Anne Dickson 4,220 10.0 N/A
Alliance John Cushnahan 4,120 9.7 +1.6
Republican Clubs Seamus Lynch 1,907 4.5 N/A
NI Labour Alan Carr 1,889 4.4 -0.8
Majority 995 2.4 N/A
Turnout 42,344 65.1 -0.8
Registered electors 65,073
DUP gain from UUP Swing
General Election October 1974: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP John Carson 29,662 62.6 +18.9
SDLP Thomas Donnelly 11,400 24.1 -0.3
Alliance John Ferguson 3,807 8.1 N/A
NI Labour Billy Boyd 2,481 5.2 -0.7
Majority 18,222 38.5 +20.7
Turnout 47,670 65.9 -2.3
Registered electors 71,779
UUP hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP John Carson 21,531 43.7 -4.8
Pro-Assembly Unionist David Smyth 12,755 25.9 N/A
SDLP Thomas Donnelly 12,003 24.4 N/A
NI Labour Sandy Scott 2,917 5.9 -26.0
Majority 8,776 17.8 +1.3
Turnout 49,206 68.2 -9.8
Registered electors 72,178
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1970: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Stratton Mills 28,668 48.5
NI Labour John Sharkey 18,894 31.9
Protestant Unionist William Beattie 11,173 18.8 N/A
Independent Unionist John McKeague 441 0.8 N/A
Majority 9,774 16.5 +1.6
Turnout 59,176 78.0 +12.5
Registered electors 75,740
UUP hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Stratton Mills 26,891 57.4 -2.2
NI Labour David Overend 19,927 42.6 +7.7
Majority 6,964 14.9 -9.8
Turnout 46,818 65.5 -4.0
Registered electors 71,434
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1964: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Stratton Mills 29,976 59.6 -1.1
NI Labour Jack McDowell 17,564 34.9 -0.3
Independent Republican Francis McGlade 2,743 5.5 N/A
Majority 12,412 24.7 -0.9
Turnout 50,283 69.5 -1.6
Registered electors 72,400
UUP hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Stratton Mills 32,173 60.7 -2.6
NI Labour Jack McDowell 18,640 35.2 +7.0
Sinn Féin Francis McGlade 2,156 4.1 -4.4
Majority 13,533 25.6 -9.5
Turnout 52,969 71.1 +1.8
Registered electors 74,494
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1955: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP H. Montgomery Hyde 33,745 63.3 +2.6
NI Labour Billy Boyd 15,065 28.2 -11.1
Sinn Féin Francis McGlade 4,534 8.5 N/A
Majority 18,680 35.1 +13.8
Turnout 53,344 69.3 -6.4
Registered electors 76,990
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1951: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP H. Montgomery Hyde 34,995 60.7 -3.7
NI Labour James Morrow 22,685 39.3 +3.7
Majority 12,310 21.3 -7.5
Turnout 57,680 75.7 +0.8
Registered electors 76,243
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1950: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP H. Montgomery Hyde 36,412 64.4 +9.1
NI Labour William Leeburn 20,146 35.6 -9.1
Majority 16,266 28.8 +18.2
Turnout 56,558 74.9 +11.3
Registered electors 75,563
UUP hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP William Frederick Neill 25,761 55.3 N/A
NI Labour William Leeburn 20,845 44.7 N/A
Majority 4,916 10.6 N/A
Turnout 46,606 63.6 N/A
Registered electors 73,231
UUP hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General Election 1935: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 64,259
UUP hold
General Election 1931: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 62,017
UUP hold

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929: Belfast North[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas Somerset 27,812 62.1 -34.5
Independent Unionist Tommy Henderson 10,909 24.4 N/A
Temperance Unionist and Local Optionist David Wilson 6,059 13.5 N/A
Majority 16,903 37.8 -55.5
Turnout 44,780 72.9 -2.5
Registered electors 61,438
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1924: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas McConnell 34,182 96.6 +41.1
Sinn Féin Hugh Corvin 1,192 3.4 N/A
Majority 32,990 93.2 +25.0
Turnout 35,374 75.4 +7.2
Registered electors 46,902
UUP hold Swing
General Election 1923: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas Edward McConnell 16,771 52.5 N/A
Independent Unionist Tommy Henderson 15,171 47.5 N/A
Majority 1,600 5.0 N/A
Turnout 31,942 68.2 N/A
Registered electors 46,844
UUP hold Swing N/A
General Election 1922: Belfast North
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Thomas McConnell Unopposed
Registered electors
UUP win (new seat)

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General Election December 1910: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Robert Thompson Unopposed
Registered electors
UUP hold
General Election January 1910: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
UUP Robert Thompson 6,275 61.4 +9.9
Labour Robert Gageby 3,951 38.6 −9.9
Majority 2,324 22.7 +19.6
Turnout 10,226 86.4 +1.7
Registered electors 11,829
UUP hold Swing +9.9

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

Belfast North by-election, 1907[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist George Smith Clark 6,021 58.9 +7.4
Labour William Walker 4,194 41.1 -7.4
Majority 1,827 17.9 +14.8
Turnout 10,215 84.7 +1.1
Registered electors 12,065
Irish Unionist hold Swing +7.4
General Election 1906: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist Daniel Dixon 4,907 51.5 -17.7
Labour William Walker 4,616 48.5 N/A
Majority 291 3.1 -35.3
Turnout 9,523 83.6 +24.0
Registered electors 11,385
Irish Unionist hold Swing
Belfast North by-election, 1905[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist Daniel Dixon 4,440 52.8 -16.4
Labour William Walker 3,966 47.2 N/A
Majority 474 5.6 -32.8
Turnout 8,406 78.1 +18.5
Registered electors 10,762
Irish Unionist hold Swing
General Election 1900: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist James Horner Haslett 4,172 69.2 N/A
Independent Liberal Unionist Thomas Harrison 1,855 30.8 N/A
Majority 2,317 38.4 N/A
Turnout 6,027 59.6 N/A
Registered electors 10,117
Irish Unionist hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

Belfast North by-election, 1896[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist James Horner Haslett 3,595 51.1 N/A
Independent Unionist Adam Turner 3,434 48.9 N/A
Majority 161 2.3 N/A
Turnout 7,029 76.4 N/A
Registered electors 9,201
Irish Unionist hold Swing N/A
General Election 1895: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist Edward Harland Unopposed
Registered electors
Irish Unionist hold
General Election 1892: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist Edward Harland Unopposed
Registered electors 8,610
Irish Unionist hold

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

Belfast North by-election, 1889[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist Edward Harland Unopposed
Registered electors 6,469
Irish Unionist hold
General Election 1886: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Unionist William Ewart 4,522 86.1 +11.5
Irish Parliamentary Charles James Dempsey 732 13.9 N/A
Majority 3,790 72.2 +22.9
Turnout 5,254 76.9 +0.1
Registered electors 6,831
Irish Unionist hold Swing
General Election 1885: Belfast North[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Conservative William Ewart 3,915 74.6 N/A
Independent Alexander Bowman 1,330 25.4 N/A
Majority 2,585 49.3 N/A
Turnout 5,245 76.8 N/A
Registered electors 6,831
Irish Conservative win (new seat)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Usual Resident Population". Northern Ireland Neighbourhood Information Service. Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (Northern Ireland) Order 2008". www.opsi.gov.uk. Retrieved 13 April 2018. 
  3. ^ "Election of a Member of Parliament for the BELFAST NORTH Constituency - Statement of Persons Nominated and Notice of Poll". Electoral Office of Northern Ireland. 11 May 2017. Retrieved 16 May 2017. 
  4. ^ "UK Parliamentary Election Result 2017 - Belfast North". Retrieved 11 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "The Electoral Office of Northern Ireland - EONI". www.eoni.org.uk. Retrieved 13 April 2018. 
  7. ^ "Member of Parliament for Belfast North". YourNextMP. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2015. 
  8. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  9. ^ Election 2010: Belfast North, BBC News
  10. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  12. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  13. ^ "BBC - Error 404 : Not Found". bbc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 5 December 2004. Retrieved 13 April 2018. 
  14. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  15. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  16. ^ Results of Byelections in the 1983-87 Parliament in the United Kingdom Election Results website maintained by David Boothroyd
  17. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  18. ^ Craig, F.W.S., ed. (1969). British parliamentary election results 1918-1949. Glasgow: Political Reference Publications. p. 652. ISBN 0-900178-01-9. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Walker, B.M., ed. (1978). Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801-1922. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. ISBN 0901714127. 

External links[edit]