Believe women

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Protestors hold signs in protest against the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination.

"Believe women" is an American political slogan arising out of the Me Too movement.[1] It refers to the perceived necessity of accepting women's allegations of sexual harassment or sexual assault at face value. Sady Doyle, writing for Elle, argues that the phrase means "don’t assume women as a gender are especially deceptive or vindictive, and recognize that false allegations are less common than real ones."[1]

The phrase grew in popularity in response to the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination. On September 28, 2018, the dating app Bumble took out a full page advertisement in the New York Times saying simply, "Believe women".[2]

The slogan has been criticised for encouraging a presumption of guilt. Michelle Malkin, writing for The Daily Signal, suggests that it is a form of virtue signalling.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Doyle, Sady (30 November 2017). "Despite What You May Have Heard, "Believe Women" Has Never Meant "Ignore Facts"". Elle. Archived from the original on 2018-07-10. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  2. ^ Gstalter, Morgan (28 September 2018). "Dating app Bumble publishes full-page ad in NY Times: 'Believe Women'". The Hill. Archived from the original on 2018-10-01. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  3. ^ Malkin, Michelle (19 September 2018). "The Dangers of 'Believe Women'". The Daily Signal. Archived from the original on 2018-10-01. Retrieved 1 October 2018.