Bell Acres, Pennsylvania

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Bell Acres
Borough
Borough of Bell Acres
Municipal building and police offices
Municipal building and police offices
Location in Allegheny County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Location in Allegheny County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Coordinates: 40°35′32″N 80°10′34″W / 40.59222°N 80.17611°W / 40.59222; -80.17611Coordinates: 40°35′32″N 80°10′34″W / 40.59222°N 80.17611°W / 40.59222; -80.17611
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Allegheny
Settled c. 1808
Incorporated March 14, 1960
Government
 • Mayor Ron Besong (R)
Area[1]
 • Total 5.37 sq mi (13.90 km2)
 • Land 5.37 sq mi (13.90 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation 965 ft (294 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,388
 • Estimate (2016)[2] 1,392
 • Density 259.36/sq mi (100.14/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 15143
Area code(s) 412
FIPS code 42-05216
School District Quaker Valley
Website Bell Acres Borough

Bell Acres is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States, part of the Pittsburgh Metro Area. The population was 1,388 at the 2010 census.[3]

Geography[edit]

Bell Acres is located at 40°35′32″N 80°10′34″W / 40.59222°N 80.17611°W / 40.59222; -80.17611.[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13 km2), all of it land. Its average elevation is 965 feet (294 m) above sea level.[5]

Surrounding neighborhoods[edit]

Bell Acres has six borders, including Economy in Beaver County to the north and northwest, Franklin Park to the east, Sewickley Hills to the southeast, Sewickley Heights to the south, and Edgeworth and Leet Township to the southwest.

Education[edit]

Bell Acres is served by the Quaker Valley School District.

Government and politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[6][7]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 52% 439 44% 373 4% 32
2012 61% 491 38% 306 1% 9

Mayor: 4 Year Term

Ron Besong (R)

Council: 4 Year Term

Dennis Young (R) President of Bell Acres Council

Dave Renfrew (R) Vice President of Bell Acres Council

Chris Abell (D)

Ken Alvania (D)

Michelle Veeck (R)

Brock Meanor (R)

Greg Wagner (R)

Taxes[edit]

School tax millage rate- The Quaker Valley SD (shared with twelve other municipalities) in 2017 was 18.40. This ranked 35th highest/most expensive out of Allegheny County's 45 school districts, between West Allegheny SD (34th highest) and North Allegheny SD (36th highest).[8]

History[edit]

Bell Acres was settled around 1808. The area was originally established as Sewickley Township on June 28, 1854. Bell Acres was incorporated as its own borough on March 14, 1960.[9] The community was named after Bell Farms.[10]

Demographics[edit]

Single family homes off Camp Meeting Road
Historical population
Census Pop.
19701,264
19801,3073.4%
19901,4369.9%
20001,382−3.8%
20101,3880.4%
Est. 20161,392[2]0.3%
Sources:[11][12][13]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 1,382 people, 520 households, and 412 families residing in the borough. The population density was 265.3 people per square mile (102.4/km²). There were 540 housing units at an average density of 103.6 per square mile (40.0/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.66% White, 1.09% African American, 0.65% Native American, 1.52% Asian, 0.29% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.22% of the population.

There were 520 households, out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.8% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.6% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 24.1% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $61,094, and the median income for a family was $70,288. Males had a median income of $55,625 versus $29,375 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,202. About 1.9% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Bell Acres borough, Pennsylvania". U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder 2. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2011. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ EL. "2012 Allegheny County election". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Retrieved 15 October 2017. 
  7. ^ EL. "2016 Pennsylvani general election..." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 15 October 2017. 
  8. ^ EL. "Allegheny County Treasurer". Retrieved 1 September 2017. 
  9. ^ "Allegheny County - 2nd Class" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 10 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-19. 
  10. ^ "Facts about Bell Acres". Beaver County Times. Feb 21, 1999. pp. A3. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  11. ^ "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.