Ben Bard

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Ben Bard
Born Benjamin Greenberg
(1893-01-26)January 26, 1893
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Died May 17, 1974(1974-05-17) (aged 81)
Los Angeles, California
Resting place Forest Lawn Memorial Park
Great Mausoleum
Azalea Terrace
Ruth Roland's family crypt
Occupation Film, stage actor
Spouse(s) Ruth Roland
(m.1929-1937; died)
Roma Clarisse
(m.1939-1947; died)
Jackie Lynn Taylor
(m.1948-1954; divorced)

Ben Bard (January 26, 1893 – May 17, 1974) was an American movie actor, stage actor, and acting teacher. With comedian Jack Pearl, Bard worked in a comedy duo in vaudeville.[1]

In 1926, Bard, Pearl, and Sascha Beaumont appeared in a short film made in Lee DeForest's Phonofilm sound-on-film process. He had a small role in The Bat Whispers (1930). Later in the decade, he ran a leading Hollywood acting school, Ben Bard Drama.

Bard was recruited to be a leading man at Fox Film Corporation. However, he was typecast as a "Suave Heavy"—a smooth-talking, well-dressed fellow with a dark side. An example of this type is his portrayal of "Mr. Brun" in The Seventh Victim (1943). Also in 1943, Bard appeared in two other Val Lewton-produced horror films: The Leopard Man, as Robles, the Police Chief, and The Ghost Ship, as First Officer Bowns.

Bard became the head of the New Talent Department at Twentieth-Century-Fox in September 1956,[2] eventually resigning in August 1959. He re-opened his school, Ben Bard Drama, in 1960.

Personal life[edit]

  • In 1929 he married the serial film star Ruth Roland, and was married to Roland until her death in 1937.
  • In 1939, he married Roma Clarisse, an actress and last recipient of the Ruth Roland Scholarship to Ben Bard Drama. They had 3 children before she died in 1947.
  • In 1948 Bard married Jackie Lynn Taylor, an actress in the Our Gang series. They divorced in 1954.

Death[edit]

Bard died in Los Angeles in 1974, aged 81. His resting place is with Ruth Roland in an unmarked grave at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.[3] He is survived by his two sons, Bryan Barak Bard, a video documentary artist, and Bartley Bard, a professional director and screenwriter.[citation needed]

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurie Joe, Jr. (1953). Vaudeville: From the Honky-tonks to the Palace. New York: Henry Holt. p. 86. 
  2. ^ Schallert, Edwin (September 12, 1956). "Rory Calhoun Aligns With Independents; New Plays Due; Bard Signs". Los Angeles Times. 75 (9). Los Angeles, California. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com. 
  3. ^ Scott Wilson (22 August 2016). Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons. 1 (3rd ed.). McFarland. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-7864-7992-4. 

External links[edit]