Ben Macintyre

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Ben Macintyre
BornBenedict Richard Pierce MacIntyre
25 December 1963 (1963-12-25) (age 58)
Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, UK
OccupationColumnist, author
NationalityBritish

Benedict Richard Pierce Macintyre (born 25 December 1963) is a British author, historian, reviewer[1] and columnist for The Times newspaper. His columns range from current affairs to historical controversies.

Early life[edit]

Macintyre is the elder son[2] of Angus Donald Macintyre (d. 1994), Fellow and Tutor in Modern History at Magdalen College, Oxford (elected Principal of Hertford College, Oxford before his death in a car accident), author of the first scholarly work on the Irish nationalist Daniel O'Connell, general editor of the Oxford Historical Monographs series from 1971 to 1979, editor of The English Historical Review from 1978 to 1986, and Chairman of the Governors of Magdalen College School from 1987 to 1990, and Joanna, daughter of Sir Richard Musgrave Harvey, 2nd Baronet and a descendant of Berkeley Paget.[3][4] His paternal grandmother was a descendant of James Netterville, 7th Viscount Netterville.[5]

Macintyre was educated at Abingdon School and St John's College, Cambridge, graduating with a degree in history in 1985.[6]

Writing[edit]

Macintyre is the author of a book on the gentleman criminal Adam Worth, The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief.

He also wrote The Man Who Would Be King: The First American in Afghanistan (about Josiah Harlan). This was also published as Josiah the Great: The True Story of the Man who Would be King.[7] Harlan is one of the candidates presumed to be the basis for Rudyard Kipling's short story The Man Who Would Be King.

His book on Eddie Chapman, a double agent of Germany and Britain during the Second World War, was titled Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Betrayer, Hero, Spy.

In 2008, Macintyre wrote an illustrated account of Ian Fleming, creator of the fictional spy James Bond, to accompany the For Your Eyes Only, Ian Fleming and James Bond exhibition at London's Imperial War Museum, which was part of the Fleming Centenary celebrations.[8][9]

Macintyre's 2020 book Agent Sonya: Moscow's Most Daring Wartime Spy, a biography of Soviet agent Ursula Kuczynski, was featured on BBC Radio 4 as a Book of the Week.[10]

In 2021, Operation Mincemeat, a cinematic adaptation of Macintyre's 2010's homonymous book, subtitled The True Spy Story that Changed the Course of World War II, premiered in Australia's British Film Festival, and was released to the public in 2022.

Personal life[edit]

He has three children and is divorced from the writer and documentary maker Kate Muir.

Documentaries[edit]

Five of his books have been made into documentaries for the BBC:

Awards and honours[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Forgotten Fatherland: The Search for Elisabeth Nietzsche. New York 1992. ISBN 978-0-374-15759-3[17]
  • The Napoleon of Crime: The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997. ISBN 978-0-374-21899-7.
  • A Foreign Field. HarperCollins, 2001. ISBN 978-0-00-257122-7. (American edition: The Englishman's Daughter: A True Story of Love and Betrayal in World War One. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002. ISBN 978-0-374-12985-9.)
  • The Man Who Would Be King: The First American in Afghanistan. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004. ISBN 978-0-374-20178-4.
  • Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Betrayer, Hero, Spy. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-0-7475-8794-1.
  • For Your Eyes Only: Ian Fleming and James Bond. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2008. .
  • The Last Word: Tales from the Tip of the Mother Tongue. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2009. ISBN 978-1-4088-0333-2.
  • Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story that Changed the Course of World War II. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2010. ISBN 978-0-7475-9868-8.
  • Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012. ISBN 978-1-4088-1990-6.
  • A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014. ISBN 978-1408851722.
  • Rogue Heroes: The History of the SAS, Britain's Secret Special Forces Unit That Sabotaged the Nazis and Changed the Nature of War; McClelland & Stewart; 2017; 400pp; ISBN 978-0771060328
  • The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War; Viking, 2018, 352pp; ISBN 978-0241186657[18]
  • Agent Sonya: Lover, Mother, Soldier, Spy; Viking, 2020, 384pp; ISBN 978-0241408506[19]
  • Colditz: Prisoners of the Castle; Viking, 2022, 384pp; ISBN 978-0241408520

Critical studies and reviews of Macintyre's work[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Macintyre, Ben (12 October 1997). "Gaslight". The New York Times.
  2. ^ He has an elder sister, born 1962, and a younger brother, born 1971, per Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 107th edition, vol. 2, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 2003, p. 1812
  3. ^ Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 107th edition, vol. 2, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 2003, p. 1812
  4. ^ "OBITUARIES : Angus Macintyre". Independent.co.uk. 22 October 2011.
  5. ^ Burke's Irish Family Records, ed. Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1976, p. 358
  6. ^ 'Cambridge University Tripos Results', The Guardian, 5 July 1985.
  7. ^ Macintyre, Ben; Josiah the Great: The True Story of the Man who Would be King; HarperCollins; 2004, 350pp; ISBN 9780007151066
  8. ^ Macintyre, Ben, Imperial War Museum;For Your Eyes Only, Ian Fleming and James Bond; Bloomsbury Publishing; London; 2008; 224pp;ISBN 978-1-5969-1544-2
  9. ^ Imperial War Museum catalogue number LBY 08 / 802
  10. ^ "Agent Sonya by Ben Macintyre". BBC RADIO 4. BBC. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  11. ^ Walker George Films: Operation Mincemeat
  12. ^ Walker George Films: DOUBLE AGENT: The Eddie Chapman Story
  13. ^ Walker George Films: Double Cross – The True Story of the D Day Spies
  14. ^ "Kim Philby - His Most Intimate Betrayal". BBC TWO. BBC. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  15. ^ "SAS: Rogue Warriors". BBC TWO. BBC. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  16. ^ "The Baillie Gifford Prize 2018 announces shortlist". Baillie Gifford Prize. 2 October 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  17. ^ See Nueva Germania and Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche.
  18. ^ Harding, Luke (19 September 2018). "Review of The Spy and the Traitor by Ben Macintyre". The Guardian.
  19. ^ Feigel, Lara (30 September 2020). "Review of Agent Sonya by Ben Macintyre". The Guardian.

External links[edit]