Ben White (finance journalist)

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Ben White (born 1972 - died June 1, 2024) was an American journalist known for his coverage of finance and policy.

Before his death, White was the chief economic correspondent for Politico. Prior to joining Politico in 2009, White worked for The New York Times. Between 2005 and 2007, he was U.S. Banking Editor and Wall Street correspondent for the Financial Times. White had previously been Wall Street correspondent for The Washington Post''.[1][2]

White wrote Politico's[3] Morning Money column on the interface between public policy and finance.[4][5] Business Insider described White's coverage of the fiscal cliff as "second to none."[3]

In 2009, while working at The New York Times, White shared a Society of Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) award for breaking news coverage of the financial crisis of 2007–08.[6][7]

White was a 1994 graduate of Kenyon College.[1] He died after a brief illness on June 1, 2024.[8]

References

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  1. ^ a b "Politico bio". Politico.com. Politico. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  2. ^ Weisenthal, Joe (30 January 2013). "POLITICO Re-Signs Its Star Wall Street Reporter To New 2-Year Deal". Business Insider. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  3. ^ a b La Roche, Julia (5 December 2012). "POLITICO Reporter Goes On Historic Twitter Tirade Against HuffPo After Being Left Off One Of Their Lists". Business Insider.
  4. ^ Rothstein, Betsey (7 September 2012). "The FishbowlDC Interview With Politico's Irascible Morning Money Man Ben White". AdWeek.
  5. ^ Snyder, Whitney (22 April 2014). "Getting Served Is No Way To Start Your Morning". Huffington Post. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Ben White". cnbc.com. ANBC. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  7. ^ "SABEW Announces Winners in Annual Best in Business Contest". Bloomberg. Market Wire. 24 March 2009. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  8. ^ @EconomyBen (June 4, 2024). "This is Ben's partner, Sara. I'm heartbroken to tell you that Ben died on Saturday, June 1 after a brief illness. He loved his family, being a journalist, rooting for the Yankees and the Commanders and so much more. He'll forever be in my heart and will be missed by so many" (Tweet). Retrieved June 4, 2024 – via Twitter.
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