Benedict

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Benedict may refer to:

Places[edit]

Schools[edit]

Food[edit]

  • Eggs Benedict, an American dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin, topped with ham or bacon, poached eggs, and Hollandaise sauce
  • Benedictine (spread), a spread/dip made with cucumbers and cream cheese

Science[edit]

People[edit]

Saints[edit]

  • Benedict of Aniane (747–821), Benedictine monk and monastic reformer, who left a large imprint on the religious practice of the Carolingian Empire
  • Benedict Biscop (628–690), Anglo-Saxon abbot and founder of Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Priory (where he also founded the famous library) and was considered a saint after his death
  • Benedict the Bridge-Builder, also known as Bénézet
  • Benedict (bishop of Milan) (died 732), archbishop of Milan from c. 685 to c. 732
  • Benedict Joseph Labre (1748–1783), French mendicant, Franciscan tertiary and Roman Catholic saint
  • Benedict the Moor (1526–1589), also known as Benedict the Black
  • Benedict of Nursia (480–c. 540), Christian saint, writer of the Rule of Saint Benedict that inspired most Western monasticism, honored by the Anglican Church and the Catholic Church as the patron saint of Europe and students
  • Benedict of Szkalka, born Stojislav in Nitra (Nyitra), Hungarian Kingdom, was a Benedictine monk and Roman Catholic saint

Popes[edit]

  • Pope Benedict I (died 579), head of the Catholic Church from 2 June 575 to his death in 579
  • Pope Benedict II (635–685), also a saint
  • Pope Benedict III (died 858), head of the Catholic Church from 29 September 855 to his death in 858
  • Pope Benedict IV (died 903), head of the Catholic Church from 1 February 900 to his death in 903
  • Pope Benedict V (died 965), head of the Catholic Church from 22 May to 23 June 964, in opposition to Pope Leo VIII
  • Pope Benedict VI (died 974), head of the Catholic Church from 19 January 973 to his death in 974
  • Pope Benedict VII (died 983), head of the Catholic Church from October 974 to his death in 983
  • Pope Benedict VIII (died 1024), head of the Catholic Church from 18 May 1012 to his death in 1024
  • Pope Benedict IX (c. 1010–1056), in Rome, was the head of the Catholic Church on three occasions between October 1032 and July 1048
  • Pope Benedict XI (1240–1304), head of the Catholic Church from 22 October 1303 to his death in 1304
  • Pope Benedict XII (c. 1280–1342), head of the Catholic Church from 20 December 1334 to his death in 1342. He was the third Avignon Pope
  • Pope Benedict XIII (1649–1730), later Friar Vincenzo Maria Orsini, O.P., was the head of the Catholic Church from 29 May 1724 to his death in 1730
  • Pope Benedict XIV (1675–1758), head of the Catholic Church from 17 August 1740 to his death in 1758
  • Pope Benedict XV (1854–1922), head of the Catholic Church from 3 September 1914 to his death in 1922
  • Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927), Roman Pontiff Emeritus

Antipopes[edit]

  • Antipope Benedict X (c. 1000–c. 1070), son of Guido (the youngest son of Alberic III, Count of Tusculum), a brother of the notorious Pope Benedict IX (deposed in 1048), a member of the dominant political dynasty in the region at that time
  • Antipope Benedict XIII (1328–1423), known as el Papa Luna in Spanish, was an Aragonese nobleman, who is officially considered by the Catholic Church to be an antipope
  • Antipope Benedict XIV, the name used by two closely related minor antipopes of the 15th century

See also[edit]